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Aim is to Become World’s Biggest Hotel Chain: Oyo

We are committed to growing the right way, says an Oyo spokesperson

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Oyo
Oyo issued a statement on Saturday following allegations in an article in the New York Times which said the "Softbank Jewel in India" is facing toxic culture and troubling incidents. Wikimedia Commons

Hospitality chain Oyo said on Saturday that it is committed to “growing the right way” by meeting the needs of property owners and guests.

Oyo issued a statement on Saturday following allegations in an article in the New York Times which said the “Softbank Jewel in India” is facing toxic culture and troubling incidents.

“While Ritesh Agarwal’s Oyo aims to be the world’s biggest hotel chain, its growth was fuelled by questionable practices, employees said,” as per the report.

“We are committed to growing OYO the right way — by meeting the needs of property owners and of the guests we serve together. We work hard every day to ensure that our values are upheld by thousands of committed employees around the world, and we are subject to regular external audits to ensure proper compliance and adherence to our Code of Conduct,” an Oyo spokesperson said in the statement.

Oyo
While Ritesh Agarwal’s Oyo aims to be the world’s biggest hotel chain, its growth was fuelled by questionable practices, employees said. Wikimedia Commons

“With regard to complaints of a small section of property owners in India whose payments are disputed, multiple escalation mechanisms exist and we continue to provide resolution,” the statement read.

“We are also investing in technology and in building stronger partner support teams to ensure reconciliations happen faster. We expect all hotel owners to partner in delivering superior guest experience.

“We will also continue to utilise the provisions in our contracts that allow us to incentivise and recognise thousands of owners who consistently deliver high-quality guest experience,” the hotel chain said.

Sources said the instances of holding back payments were incorrect and present a one-sided evaluation of the situation.

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“There is an automated reconciliation for payments transfers in the first week of every month and OYO has committed to an 18 per cent interest pay-out in case of any delays therein, provided there are no discrepancies. We have been engaging with our asset owners on a one to one basis, and to address concerns, if any,” the statement said. (IANS)

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Mothers Find Gaps in Accessibility of Breastfeeding Resources at Work: Research

Mothers still face barriers to breastfeed at work

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The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers. Pixabay

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, says a new health research.

The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers.

“We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation,” said study lead author Rachel McCardel from University of Georgia in US.

“There is a collective experience that we wanted to explore and learn how can we make this better,” McCardel added.

breastfeeding
Returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation. Pixabay

For the findings, research team specifically wanted to better understand breastfeed support in the workplace since US federal guidelines went into place over a decade ago requiring employers to provide unpaid break time and a space other than a restroom for employees to be able to express breast milk.

For their study, the research team surveyed female employees who performed a variety of jobs.

In addition to asking questions about their access to breast feed resources like private rooms, breast pumps and lactation consultants, the respondents were also asked about their experiences with combining breastfeeding and work.

They found that most respondents, nearly 80 per cent, had a private space at work to express milk, and around two-thirds of the women reported having break times to breastfeed.

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Access to other resources like lactation consultants or breast pumps was less common.

According to the study, many respondents also said they hadn’t expected to get much help from their employers, and there was a general lack of communication about the resources available to them. (IANS)