Tuesday January 28, 2020
Home Lead Story Air India Ser...

Air India Server Crashes, Services Hit

As per the reports, restoration process was underway and details are awaited

0
//
agra tourism industry
This week, the Air India flight connecting Delhi with Khajuraho, Varanasi via Agra began operations. Pixabay

Flight operations of Air India were hit on Saturday after a reported glitch in its main server, according to sources.

At the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport in Mumbai, thousands of passengers were stranded and many flights affected.

“There is total chaos and confusion here, long queues of passengers,” a passenger, T. Choudhary said.

Air-India
Air-India. Wikimedia Commons

According to airline sourses, the problem was apparently with the SITA server which provides the technology for check-in, baggage handling and boarding.

Also Read- Social Networking Giant Facebook Finally Bans Personality Quiz Apps

As per the reports, restoration process was underway and details are awaited. (IANS)

Next Story

Google Makes Changes To “Project Zero” Disclosure Programme

Announced in July, 2014, the Project Zero is a team of security analysts employed by Google

0
Google
The tech giant Google said it will try this policy for 12 months, and then consider whether to change it long term. Pixabay

In a bid to give developers more time to address security vulnerabilities, Google has made changes to its Project Zero disclosure programme which could also mean that other companies roll out half-baked patches.

Announced in July, 2014, the Project Zero is a team of security analysts employed by Google who are tasked with finding zero-day vulnerabilities, the secret hackable bugs which are exploited by criminals, state-sponsored hackers, and intelligence agencies.

“We recently reviewed our policies and the goals we hope to accomplish with our disclosure policy. As a result of that review, we have decided to make some changes to our vulnerability disclosure policy in 2020. We will start by describing the changes to the policy, and then discuss the rationale behind these changes,” Tim Willis, Manager, Project Zero, wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

“For vulnerabilities reported starting January 1, 2020, we are changing our Disclosure Policy: Full 90 days by default, regardless of when the bug is fixed.”

If there is mutual agreement between the vendor and Project Zero, bug reports can be opened to the public before 90 days elapse.

For example, a vendor wants to synchronise the opening of our tracker report with their release notes to minimise user confusion and questions.

Google
In a bid to give developers more time to address security vulnerabilities, Google has made changes to its Project Zero disclosure programme which could also mean that other companies roll out half-baked patches. Pixabay

“Fix a bug in 20 days? We will release all details on Day 90. Fix a bug in 90 days? We will release all details on Day 90,” noted Willis.

ALSO READ: Tech Giant Samsung Sold Approx 4 Lakh Galaxy Fold Smartphones in 2019: Tech Report

The tech giant said it will try this policy for 12 months, and then consider whether to change it long term. (IANS)

Next Story