Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
air pollution. wikimedia
  • Air pollution, if left unaddressed, is expected to increase air pollution-related deaths by nearly 60,000 in 2030 and 2,60,000 in 2100 globally
  • Locations that get drier may also have worse air pollution because of less removal by rain and increased fires and windblown dust
  • The team used an ensemble of several global climate models to determine the number of premature deaths that would occur due to ozone and particulate matter in 2030 and 2100

New York, August 2, 2017: Air pollution, if left unaddressed, is expected to increase air pollution-related deaths by nearly 60,000 in 2030 and 2,60,000 in 2100 globally, a study has claimed.

According to the study, hotter temperatures speed up the chemical reactions that create air pollutants like ozone and fine particulate matters, which impact public health.


Locations that get drier may also have worse air pollution because of less removal by rain and increased fires and windblown dust. As trees respond to higher temperatures, they will also emit more organic pollutants, the researchers said.

“As climate change affects air pollutant concentrations, it can have a significant impact on health worldwide, adding to the millions of people who die from air pollution each year,” said lead researcher Jason West, Associate Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

For the study which appeared in the journal Nature Climate Change, the team used an ensemble of several global climate models to determine the number of premature deaths that would occur due to ozone and particulate matter in 2030 and 2100.

ALSO READ: Indian Researcher part of the team that developed new hyper-local Air Pollution Map

For each model, the team assessed the projected changes in ground-level air pollution that could be attributed to future climate change. They then overlaid these changes spatially on the global population, accounting for both population growth and expected changes in susceptibility to air pollution.

Five out of eight models predicted there will be more premature deaths in 2030, and seven of nine models in 2100.

“Our finding that most models show a likely increase in deaths is the clearest signal yet that climate change will be detrimental to air quality and health,” West noted.

In addition to exacerbating air pollution-related deaths, climate change is expected to affect health through changes in heat stress, access to clean water and food, severe storms and the spread of infectious diseases, the researchers said. (IANS)


Popular

Majority of millennials have become more cautious about their finances as a result of the pandemic. | Unsplash

The 'Millennial Mood Index 2021' (MMI) was released by CASHe, India's AI-driven financial wellness platform with a mission to make financial inclusion possible for all. According to the survey, more than 84 per cent of millennials across the country have increased their wealth-management strategy to prepare for future contingencies while also looking for opportunities for stronger and more sustainable growth in the post-pandemic world. The pan-India survey, conducted among more than 30k customers on CASHe's platform, aimed to capture the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and how it has altered millennials' everyday behaviour across a variety of topics such as health, travel, shopping, savings & credit appetite, and so on.

Also Read : Co-living preferred housing solution for millennials

Keep Reading Show less

Ranjay Gulati shows the catastrophic blunders leaders unintentionally make. | IANS

A renowned Harvard Business School professor delivers a persuasive reconsideration and defence of purpose as a management ethos, demonstrating the enormous performance advantages and societal benefits that can be realised when businesses get their purpose right.

Too many businesses use purpose, or a reason for existing, as a marketing tool to make themselves feel good and appear good to the public.

Keep Reading Show less
Unsplash

Student demonstrations erupted across Bihar, and a passenger train in Gaya was set ablaze. (Image used for representation only)

In India, on January 26, 2022, thousands of youngsters set fire to empty train carriages. They disrupted rail traffic in order to protest what they claim are irregularities in recruiting by the railway department, which is one of the world's major employers. (VOA/ MBI)


Keep reading... Show less