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Congress leader Ajay Maken. Photo Credit: www.deccanchronicle.com

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

New Delhi: A Public Interest Litigation (PIL) was filed on Saturday by Congress leader Ajay Maken accusing the ruling Aam Aadmi Party and MCDs of not acting responsibly to control the spread of dengue in the national capital.



Photo Credit: www.bhaskar.com

Photo Credit: www.bhaskar.com

In the PIL, Maken said the Delhi government failed to initiate awareness campaigns and a dengue outbreak alarm was raised only after fatal cases of dengue, which is otherwise not a life-threatening disease.

It said the Delhi government had allocated approximately Rs 81 crore towards “Malaria and Dengue Control Programs”. However, it has not bothered to release the funds to the MCDs and citing lack of funds as an ‘alibi’ for their gross failure in controlling dengue outbreak, the agencies have rendered the general public completely helpless.

“There is a lack of coordination and unpreparedness on behalf of the Delhi government, Central government and also the municipal authorities in Delhi in addressing and controlling the unprecedented outbreak of dengue and the deteriorating public health in the city,” said the plea.

It said all hospitals– private and public– should be directed to not refuse any patients on account of monetary conditions or any other reason and in any case of misconduct of the hospitals or refusal, heavy penalty must be imposed by the court.

The MCDs should be directed to urgently undertake special fumigation drives, sanitation drives, and anti-mosquito breeding drives in their respective areas, said the PIL, adding that the Central government should be directed to depute more doctors in the national capital from the Central pool (i.e. from other states).

The PIL is likely to come up for hearing on Monday.

(With inputs from IANS)


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