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Akbar Bugti: Remembering the Balochistan Hero on his 11th Martyrdom Anniversary

With age being no factor, the Nawab fought for Balochistan till his dying breath

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Martyrdom Anniversary
Nawab Akbar Khan Bugti died fighting for Baloch freedom. Facebook
  • Akbar Bugti was the governor and CM of Balochistan
  • The Martyr bravely died in his fight to liberate Balochistan from oppressive Pakistani forces
  • He was martyred on 26 August 2006 in a battle against Pakistani military

August 26, 2017: Nawab Akbar Khan Bugti is a name that can never be erased from Balochistan history. The Baloch hero sacrificed a prosperous and luxurious life for the people of Balochistan.

When the people of Balochistan were in dire need of help, Nawab Akbar Bugti stood up for them. With age being no factor, the Nawab fought for Balochistan till his dying breath.

Here are 15 things you need to know about the Baloch hero, Akbar Bugti:

1. Born in Barkhan, Balochistan on 12th July 1927, Nawab Akbar Khan Bugti went on to attend the Oxford University in London. At just 13 years of age, Akbar Bugti was declared the chief of his tribe after his father’s death in 1939.

2. Bugti favored the separation of Pakistan from India, but while he was a Pakistani nationalist, he was a stronger Baloch nationalist. In 1947, he also advocated the accession of Balochistan from Pakistan.

3. He was appointed as Interior Minister of the State in 1958, thus starting his political career.

4. From the beginning till mid-1960’s, Akbar Bugti was imprisoned for supporting a National Awami Candidate and helping him defeat Field Marshal Ayub Khan. This had left Ayub Khan embarrassed who ordered for Bugti’s imprisonment. He was finally let go after a long hunger strike.

Also Read: Seminar in Washington to Pay Tributes to Former Balochistan Governor and Chief Minister Nawab Akbar Khan Bugti

5. He was appointed the governor of Balochistan by the Federal Government in the early 1970s but resigned after Pakistan Military began massive oppression of Baloch people.

6. Akbar Bugti became the Chief Minister of Balochistan National Alliance in 1988 but resigned when Gen. Muhammad Musa Khan dissolved the provincial assembly.

Martyrdom Anniversary
Akbar Bugti in Dera Bugti. Twitter

7. Bugti, several years later, formed his political party called Jamhoori Watan Party. The party became rapidly popular among the people of Balochistan. In 1997, he was re-elected to National Assembly.

8. After the 2005 rape incident involving a young Sindhi girl and a Pakistani officer, Bugti demanded justice, but it yielded no results. Parvez Musharraf refused to speed up the trial of accused officer.

9. As heated remarks came from both sides, Musharraf launched a military attack on Bugti and his forces. The fighting continued for months with troops dying from both sides.

10. Pakistani forces on 26th August 2006 carried out the encounter of Bugti and 23 of his troops. Musharraf was quoted in December 2005 saying, “There are two or three tribal chiefs and feudal lords behind whats going on in Balochistan. My government is determined to establish its writ. It will be a fight to the finish.”

11. During the battle between Bugti’s forces and Pakistan Military, Bugti’s base of operations Dera Bugti was heavily bombarded. As a result of this offense, 1,60,000 people were displaced from the region.

12. While Musharraf hoped that Bugti’s death would suppress demands for a separate Baloch, more fuel was added to the fire that was once ignited by Akbar Bugti. Separatist movements sparked higher.

13. Musharraf always maintained that the goal was to capture Bugti alive. Some stories also say that Bugti killed himself when the Pakistani military cornered him.

14. Gen. Parvez Musharraf was acquitted of the charges against him for the murder of Akbar Bugti in January 2016.

15. One of Bugti’s quotes that define his life came in a telephonic interview with TIME in the year 2016, “It is better to die-as the Americans say-with your spurs on. Instead of a slow death in bed, I’d rather death come to me while I am fighting for a purpose.” Bugti died at 79 years of age.

Baloch people will never forget the contributions and acts of bravery exhibited by Akbar Bugti. His courage continues to inspire the very youth that seeks the same purpose: Separation from Oppressive Pakistan. 


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Women of Pakistan Protest Against Workplace Harassment, Child Marriage

Leader of the Opposition Shahbaz Sharif lauded "the incredible work our women are doing to strengthen their families, communities and the country"

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Following this, a National Security Committee was also held to discuss Sharif's
Pakistan Flag, wikimedia commons

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, women took to the streets across Pakistan on Friday to protest against sexual harassment in the workplace, child marriage ‘honour killings, wage inequalities and limited political representation.

Organisers hope that the “aurat march” (women’s march) and “aurat azadi march” (women’s liberation march) will draw attention to the struggle for reproductive, economic, and social justice across in Pakistan, reports the Guardian.

The first “Aurat March” was held last year in Karachi; this time, the rally has been extended to more cities, including Lahore, Multan, Faisalabad, Larkana and Hyderabad.

The aim is to reach ordinary women in factories, homes and offices, says Nighat Dad, an “aurat march” organiser in Lahore.

“We want an organic movement by women demanding equal access to justice and ending discrimination of all kinds.”

Speakers at the Lahore march ranged from a woman fighting to reform marriage laws to the women who worked on the landmark Punjab Domestic Workers’ Act — a legislation that outlaws child labour in homes and provides maternity benefits to workers.

Another activist, Leena Ghani, noted that Pakistani women have a history of taking to the streets, famously during military dictator Zia ul-Haq’s martial law in the 1980s.

Krishna Kumari works in her office in Hyderabad, Pakistan, Feb. 12, 2018. VOA

While Pakistan has made major strides towards gender equality, poorer, marginalised women and transgender citizens continue to struggle, Ghani added.

Designer Shehzil Malik created a series of striking posters for the “aurat march” that counter typical representations of Pakistani women as docile and subservient.

Women are also protesting against discriminatory policies in universities, where male and female students are afforded different levels of freedom, the Guardian said.

A Pakistani university recently caused a furore on social media by banning women from wearing skinny jeans and sleeveless shirts.

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In his message on Friday, Prime Minister Imran Khan reaffirmed his government’s commitment to providing women a safe environment so that they could contribute to the country’s development, Dawn news reported.

“We reaffirm our commitment to ensuring women a secure and enabling environment to play their rightful role in our nation’s development.”

Leader of the Opposition Shahbaz Sharif lauded “the incredible work our women are doing to strengthen their families, communities and the country”. (IANS)