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Actor Akshay Kumar, Wikimedia

Akshay Kumar, who features as the antagonist in the much-awaited, high-budget entertainer “2.0”, went through an elaborate prosthetic make-up process for his character. The actor says it was quite a test of his patience and that it has calmed him down.

“It was really a hard process for me to get the prosthetics done. For almost three and a half hours, I had to sit down quietly and do nothing. Three people used to work on my body and I had to stay patient…that was tough. I would say that the whole process of prosthetics made me a much calmer and patient person.


“I am already a patient person, but this made me more subtle and mellow at that time,” Akshay Kumar told a select group of media here on Monday.

The procedure used to not end there as the removal of the make-up required one and a half hours. The actor found it quite painful. In fact, Akshay Kumar had to stay on a liquid diet of water, smoothies and juices during his shooting schedule.

“When I used to go back home, I knew that I have to do the same thing again tomorrow morning. The make-up was so hard and covered that it used to close all the pores of my body and during my entire six hours of working, my body sweat used to not come out. So in the end when they used to remove the prosthetic, I had the smell of sweat,” shared the actor, who feels fortunate to have worked with iconic southern Indian filmmaker S. Shankar and with megastar Rajinikanth.


Process of prosthetics has made me calmer, patient: Akshay Kumar. flickr

“2.0” is a sequel of the commercially successful sci-fi Rajinikanth-starrer “Enthiran”, which released in 2010.

So, what was the first thing Akshay did after he saw his first look?

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“I clicked a lot of selfies with my family. My wife and daughter were there with me. my daughter was quite excited to see me in the look and she was not scared at all…because she saw that some people are putting something on her father’s face. She was fine,” smiled the father of two children.

The movie, which also features Amy Jackson, will release on Thursday in 14 languages including Tamil, Hindi and Telugu. Karan Johar is presenting the Hindi version of the film. (IANS)


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