Wednesday February 20, 2019

Limit Alcohol Intake to cut Risk of Cancer, Say Experts

Drinking alcohol whether, in light, moderate or heavy quantity is linked with increasing the risk of cancer of various types, including those of the breast, colon, esophagus and head and neck

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Drinking behavior can alter risk of developing cancer. Pixabay

New Delhi, November 10, 2017 : Regular consumption of alcohol may significantly increase your risk of developing several cancers, experts have warned.

Drinking alcohol whether, in light, moderate or heavy quantity is linked with increasing the risk of cancer of various types, including those of the breast, colon, esophagus and head and neck, experts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) said in a statement. Moreover, not only does excessive alcohol consumption cause cancer, it also can delay or negatively impact cancer treatment, the experts noted.

“Even moderate alcohol use can cause cancer. Therefore, limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer,” said lead author Noelle K. LoConte, Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin in the US.

“Just like people wear sunscreen to limit their risk of cancer of the skin, limiting alcohol intake is one more thing people can do to reduce their overall risk of developing cancer.”

Further, while many studies have considered some type of alcohol to be beneficial, experts noted that alcohol in all forms raises the risk of cancer.

“People typically don’t associate drinking beer, wine, and hard liquor with increasing their risk of developing cancer in their lifetimes,” said Bruce Johnson, President at the ASCO.

“However, the link between increased alcohol consumption and cancer has been firmly established and gives the medical community guidance on how to help their patients reduce their risk of cancer,” said Johnson in a paper published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Besides raising awareness on the link between alcohol and cancer, the experts also recommended some measures – such as regulating alcohol outlet density, increasing alcohol taxes and prices, maintaining limits on days and hours of sale, enhancing enforcement of laws prohibiting sales to minors and restricting youth exposure to advertising of alcoholic beverages – to reduce excessive alcohol consumption.  (IANS)

 

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Early Onset of Drinking May Lead to Alcohol Dependence, Says Study

To prevent or delay early onset of drinking, more should be known about the modifiable circumstances that enable these behaviours

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In the experiments, rats were trained to drink alcohol in a way that mimics human binge-drinking behaviour. Pixabay

Early onset of drinking and intoxication may lead to heavy drinking and alcohol dependence among people, warn researchers from the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation in the US.

Researchers concluded this in a study on the correlation between early age (less than 15 years) and contexts of first intoxication such as one’s own home, friends’ homes or outdoor settings, and the problems that arise in these contexts.

For their research, the team studied 405 adolescent (aged 15-18 years) drinkers.

According to the findings, published in the journal Substance Use & Misuse, about one-third of adolescent drinkers experienced their first intoxication by the age of 15, about one-third experienced it after 15, and about one-third had consumed alcohol but never to the stage of intoxication.

A new drug can reduce Alcohol addiction in teenagers
Early age drinking linked to alcohol dependence: Study. Pixabay

In addition, drinkers reported drinking most frequently at homes, followed by outdoor settings, and then in restaurants, bars or nightclubs.

The early age of first intoxication was found to be strongly linked to drinking in outdoor settings, but not to drinking at home.

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The results of the study emphasise importance of contexts in early alcohol initiation and the resulting problems to inform development of preventive interventions specific to contexts, said Lipperman-Kreda, a researcher from the varsity.

To prevent or delay early onset of drinking, more should be known about the modifiable circumstances that enable these behaviours, the study suggested. (IANS)