Tuesday August 14, 2018

Limit Alcohol Intake to cut Risk of Cancer, Say Experts

Drinking alcohol whether, in light, moderate or heavy quantity is linked with increasing the risk of cancer of various types, including those of the breast, colon, esophagus and head and neck

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Drinking behavior can alter risk of developing cancer. Pixabay
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New Delhi, November 10, 2017 : Regular consumption of alcohol may significantly increase your risk of developing several cancers, experts have warned.

Drinking alcohol whether, in light, moderate or heavy quantity is linked with increasing the risk of cancer of various types, including those of the breast, colon, esophagus and head and neck, experts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) said in a statement. Moreover, not only does excessive alcohol consumption cause cancer, it also can delay or negatively impact cancer treatment, the experts noted.

“Even moderate alcohol use can cause cancer. Therefore, limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer,” said lead author Noelle K. LoConte, Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin in the US.

“Just like people wear sunscreen to limit their risk of cancer of the skin, limiting alcohol intake is one more thing people can do to reduce their overall risk of developing cancer.”

Further, while many studies have considered some type of alcohol to be beneficial, experts noted that alcohol in all forms raises the risk of cancer.

“People typically don’t associate drinking beer, wine, and hard liquor with increasing their risk of developing cancer in their lifetimes,” said Bruce Johnson, President at the ASCO.

“However, the link between increased alcohol consumption and cancer has been firmly established and gives the medical community guidance on how to help their patients reduce their risk of cancer,” said Johnson in a paper published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Besides raising awareness on the link between alcohol and cancer, the experts also recommended some measures – such as regulating alcohol outlet density, increasing alcohol taxes and prices, maintaining limits on days and hours of sale, enhancing enforcement of laws prohibiting sales to minors and restricting youth exposure to advertising of alcoholic beverages – to reduce excessive alcohol consumption.  (IANS)

 

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Alcohol May Increase Death Risk in Young TB Patients

According to the researchers, the study could facilitate the development of therapies for alcoholic individuals with latent and active Mtb infections

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For the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, young and old mice were fed alcohol or control diets for one month and then infected with MtbH37Rv.
For the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, young and old mice were fed alcohol or control diets for one month and then infected with MtbH37Rv. Pixabay

Increased consumption of alcohol in people with tuberculosis (TB) may accelerate their risk of death, scientists led by an Indian-origin researcher have found.

Chronic alcohol consumption modulates a host of immune defense mechanisms and increases susceptibility to infections with various pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) — the TB-causing bacterium.

In the study, the risk was seen in young mice, not in older ones.

It was due to the production of a protein IFN-a — involved in innate immune response against viral infection — in the lungs by a subset of immune cells that express molecules called CD11b and Ly6G, explained researchers, led by Deepak Tripathi of the University of Texas.

For the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, young and old mice were fed alcohol or control diets for one month and then infected with MtbH37Rv.

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Alcohol may increase death risk in young tuberculosis patients. Pixabay

The analysis showed that 80 per cent of Mtb-infected alcohol-fed young mice died within 6 months, while the death rate was 25 per cent in Mtb-infected alcohol-fed old mice.

Further, among patients with latent tuberculosis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from young alcoholic individuals produced significantly higher amounts of IFN-a than those from young non-alcoholic, old alcoholic, and old non-alcoholic individuals.

Also Read: Teens Drinking Regularly face Worse Alcohol Problems Than Adults

This suggests that young alcoholic individuals with latent tuberculosis infection have a higher risk of developing active tuberculosis infection.

According to the researchers, the study could facilitate the development of therapies for alcoholic individuals with latent and active Mtb infections. (IANS)

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