Thursday March 21, 2019

Alcoholic Beverages Aren’t That Good For You As You May Have Thought

Are alcoholic drinks actually good for you? Think again.

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Representational image. Pixabay

We’ve heard from various studies that drinking a glass of wine a day, or any alcoholic beverage in moderation, can lower risks of serious illness such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and even gallstones.

But a new study from the UK’s University of Cambridge is contradicting those findings.

According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez)

        According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce          of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez) VOA

The paper, published in The Lancet, suggests that weekly drinking of more than five pints of beer, five glasses of wine, or five drinks with a maximum of 100 grams of pure alcohol, was linked with a lower life expectancy.

The study’s authors found drinking any more than what was suggested increases the risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and even death.

The researchers suggest having 10 to 18 drinks each week lessens life expectancy by between one to two years, and 18 drinks or more shortens life expectancy from four to five years.

 Also Read: Drinking just one or two alcoholic drinks per day may cause liver disease

“If you already drink alcohol, drinking less may help you live longer and lower your risk of several cardiovascular conditions,” said Dr. Angela Wood, from the University of Cambridge and lead author of the study in a University press release.  VOA

Next Story

Russian Chemists Develop Unique Nano-grenades To Fight Diseases

To create the nanoparticles, the team experimented with photosensitive nanomaterial technology and a chemical 'switch' method to create the nanoparticles

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Breast Cancer
. VOA

Russian chemists have developed a unique “transforming nanoparticle” that can help fight cancer and other diseases.

Professor Ekaterina Skorb and her team from ITMO University in St. Petersburg created hollow nanoparticles with a covering of polymer filaments and granules of titanium oxide and silver, the Sputnik reported on Friday.

When illuminated with an infrared laser, the structure of the nanoparticle collapses from heat and oxygen, which releases the particle’s contents.

In the study, published in the journal Bioconjugate Chemistry, the team tested out their nanoparticles on bacteria whose DNA was modified to glow when molecules came into contact with artificial sugars which were injected into the nanoparticles.

After illuminating these ‘nano-grenades’ with an infrared laser, the sugars escaped the nanoparticles’ membranes, lighting up the bacteria and proving the method’s effectiveness.

The tab was detailed in the journal Nano Energy. Wikimedia Commons
When illuminated with an infrared laser, the structure of the nanoparticle collapses from heat and oxygen, which releases the particle’s contents. Wikimedia Commons

Importantly, neither the nanoparticles nor their structural collapse affected the viability of the bacteria’s cells.

According to Skorb, the ease with which infrared radiation passes through the human body means that the use of such nanoparticles to fight cancerous tumors or various infections will be possible in virtually any part of the body.

“This area of research is interesting not only from the perspective of the localised delivery of medicines, but also for the creation of a computer in which biological molecules can be used instead of silicon chips. This will pave the way for high-precision control of chemical processes, ‘smart’ medicines and the ability to control molecular machines,” Skorb said in a statement from Russian Science Foundation, Sputnik reported.

Also Read- NASA is Concerned Over The Strains of Toilet Microbes on ISS

To create the nanoparticles, the team experimented with photosensitive nanomaterial technology and a chemical ‘switch’ method to create the nanoparticles.

It consists of titanium dioxide nanoparticles which can split water into hydrogen and oxygen atoms when exposed to light. When placed in a solution of organic compounds, the oxygen produced begins to interact with molecules, changing the acid-base balance.  (IANS)