Tuesday July 23, 2019

Alcoholic Beverages Aren’t That Good For You As You May Have Thought

Are alcoholic drinks actually good for you? Think again.

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Representational image. Pixabay

We’ve heard from various studies that drinking a glass of wine a day, or any alcoholic beverage in moderation, can lower risks of serious illness such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and even gallstones.

But a new study from the UK’s University of Cambridge is contradicting those findings.

According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez)

        According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce          of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez) VOA

The paper, published in The Lancet, suggests that weekly drinking of more than five pints of beer, five glasses of wine, or five drinks with a maximum of 100 grams of pure alcohol, was linked with a lower life expectancy.

The study’s authors found drinking any more than what was suggested increases the risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and even death.

The researchers suggest having 10 to 18 drinks each week lessens life expectancy by between one to two years, and 18 drinks or more shortens life expectancy from four to five years.

 Also Read: Drinking just one or two alcoholic drinks per day may cause liver disease

“If you already drink alcohol, drinking less may help you live longer and lower your risk of several cardiovascular conditions,” said Dr. Angela Wood, from the University of Cambridge and lead author of the study in a University press release.  VOA

Next Story

Beware! If You Work In Shifts, You Are At A Greater Risk Of Heart Diseases

Companies could also consider providing health check-ups to detect early signs of heart problems, Weihong said.

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The study was not designed to prove the cause and effect, but the data showed shift workers were 13 per cent more likely to develop coronary heart disease than daytime workers. Pixabay

People who work in shifts are at heightened danger of heart disease and the risk increases with years they work in shifts, finds a Chinese study of more than 300,000 people.

Shift work “can earn more profit, but it can also cause harm to the health of employees. Thus, employers should reduce shift work as much as possible,” lead author Weihong Chen, a researcher in occupational and environmental health at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, was quoted as saying to the Health Day.

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For every year spent working in shifts, there was a nearly one per cent increase in the risk of coronary heart disease, the report said. Pixabay

While the reason is unknown, disruption in the normal sleep-wake cycle could increase stress. In the study, published in the journal Occupational Medicine, the team analysed data from 21 earlier studies involving over 320,000 people and nearly 20,000 cases of coronary heart disease.

The study was not designed to prove the cause and effect, but the data showed shift workers were 13 per cent more likely to develop coronary heart disease than daytime workers.

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Companies could also consider providing health check-ups to detect early signs of heart problems, Weihong said. Pixabay

For every year spent working in shifts, there was a nearly one per cent increase in the risk of coronary heart disease, the report said.

Also Read: Interesting Study! Something That Reminds Us Of Coffee Can Alert Our Minds
According to Weihong, employers should pay attention to staff members who are experiencing symptoms of heart problems as well as those with a family history of heart disease. Employers could provide health promotion, such as information on how to prevent and deal with ischemic heart disease, she said.

Companies could also consider providing health check-ups to detect early signs of heart problems, Weihong said. (IANS)