Sunday November 18, 2018

Alcoholic Beverages Aren’t That Good For You As You May Have Thought

Are alcoholic drinks actually good for you? Think again.

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Representational image. Pixabay
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We’ve heard from various studies that drinking a glass of wine a day, or any alcoholic beverage in moderation, can lower risks of serious illness such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and even gallstones.

But a new study from the UK’s University of Cambridge is contradicting those findings.

According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez)

        According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce          of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez) VOA

The paper, published in The Lancet, suggests that weekly drinking of more than five pints of beer, five glasses of wine, or five drinks with a maximum of 100 grams of pure alcohol, was linked with a lower life expectancy.

The study’s authors found drinking any more than what was suggested increases the risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and even death.

The researchers suggest having 10 to 18 drinks each week lessens life expectancy by between one to two years, and 18 drinks or more shortens life expectancy from four to five years.

 Also Read: Drinking just one or two alcoholic drinks per day may cause liver disease

“If you already drink alcohol, drinking less may help you live longer and lower your risk of several cardiovascular conditions,” said Dr. Angela Wood, from the University of Cambridge and lead author of the study in a University press release.  VOA

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Maths Could Help Understand The Spread of Infectious Diseases

Fear of public pathogens may end up driving the wrong type of behaviour if the public's information is incorrect.

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Maths can help reveal how human behaviour spreads infectious diseases
Maths can help reveal how human behaviour spreads infectious diseases. Flickr

Researchers have found that maths could help public health workers understand how human behaviour influences the spread of infectious diseases like Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

Current models used to predict the emergence and evolution of pathogens within host populations did not include social behaviour.

But adding dynamic social interactions to the new model could allow scientists to better prevent undesirable outcomes, such as more dangerous mutant strains from evolving and spreading.

“We tend to treat disease systems in isolation from social systems, and we often don’t think about how they connect to each other or influence each other,” said Chris Bauch, Professor at Waterloo University in Canada.

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he team used computer simulations to analyse how the mathematical model behaved under various possible scenarios. Pixabay

“This gives us a better appreciation of how social reactions to infectious diseases can influence which strains become prominent in the population,” Bauch added.

In the study, published in the Journal of Theoretical Biology, the team used computer simulations to analyse how the mathematical model behaved under various possible scenarios.

They observed that human behaviour often changes dramatically during the outbreak, for instance, they might start using face masks.

Also Read: Cholera Infection May be on Edge in Yemen, Says WHO

Also, fear of public pathogens may end up driving the wrong type of behaviour if the public’s information is incorrect.

The new modelling could help public responses navigate and better channel these kinds of population responses, the researchers said. (IANS)