Tuesday January 22, 2019
Home Lead Story New algorithm...

New algorithm may help locate fake Facebook and Twitter accounts

Using the meta-features, the researchers, constructed a generic classifier that can detect fake profiles

0
//
Tweeters unable to automatically save tweets to facebook. Pixabay
Tweeters unable to automatically save tweets to facebook. Pixabay

Scientists have developed a new generic algorithm based on machine-learning to detect fake accounts on social network platforms including Facebook and Twitter, an advance with considerable potential for applications in the cyber-security arena.

“With recent disturbing news about failures to safeguard user privacy, and targeted use of social media to influence elections, rooting out fake users has never been of greater importance,” said lead researcher Dima Kagan from the Ben-Gurion University (BGU) in Israel.

The icon of Facebook.
Facebook has many fake profiles. Pixabay

The study showed that the algorithm is generic, and efficient both in revealing fake users and in disclosing the influential people in social networks. “Overall, the results demonstrated that in a real-life friendship scenario we can detect people who have the strongest friendship ties as well as malicious users, even on Twitter,” the researchers said.

Based on machine-learning algorithms, the new method, detailed in the journal Social Network Analysis and Mining, works on the assumption that fake accounts tend to establish improbable links to other users in the networks.

Also Read: Facebook Rolls Out Fact-Checking News In Karnataka

It constructs a link prediction classifier that can estimate, with high accuracy, the probability of a link existing between two users. It also generates a new set of meta-features based on the features created by the link prediction classifier.

Twitter to soon release Snapchat like feature. VOA
Fake accounts on Twitter will be identifie too. VOA

Using the meta-features, the researchers, constructed a generic classifier that can detect fake profiles in a variety of online social networks. “We tested our algorithm on simulated and real-world data sets on 10 different social networks and it performed well on both,” Kagan said.

Previously, researchers from the BGU had developed the Social Privacy Protector (SPP) to help users evaluate their friends list in seconds to identify which have few or no mutual links and might be “fake” profiles. IANS

Next Story

Russia’s Communication Watchdog Opens Administrative Proceedings Against Twitter, Facebook

In April last year, thousands rallied in Moscow in support of internet freedom after Russian authorities attempted to block access to the popular messaging app Telegram.

0
Facebook, Fake News
A user gets ready to launch Facebook on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. Facebook has made changes to fight false information, including de-emphasizing proven false stories in people's feeds so others are less likely to see them. VOA

Russia’s communication watchdog, Roskomnadzor, opened “administrative proceedings” Monday against Facebook and Twitter for non-compliance with country’s data laws, Interfax news agency reported.

Roskomnadzor head Alexander Zharov is quoted as saying that U.S. social media giants have a month to comply or face legal proceedings.

According to Roskomnadzor, Facebook and Twitter have not explained how and when they would comply with legislation that requires all servers used to store Russians’ personal data to be located in Russia.

Facebook, data,photos
A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Russia has introduced stricter internet laws in the past five years, among other things requiring search engines to share encryption keys with Russian security services.

Also Read: Twitter Rolls Out Reverse-chronological Timeline Option For Android

In April last year, thousands rallied in Moscow in support of internet freedom after Russian authorities attempted to block access to the popular messaging app Telegram.

Telegram had refused to give state intelligence services access to private conversations which are usually encrypted. (VOA)