Monday February 17, 2020
Home Lead Story Researchers D...

Researchers Develop an Algorithm to Map Universe, Solve Mysteries

They applied the model data on the cosmic microwave background – radiation left over from the universe’s early days

0
//
Mathematics. Source: Pixabay

Researchers have developed an algorithm designed to visualise models of the universe in order to solve some of physics’ greatest mysteries.

The algorithm was developed by applying scientific principles used to create models for understanding cell biology and physics to the challenges of cosmology and big data, according to the study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Science works because things behave much more simply than they have any right to, very complicated things end up doing rather simple collective behaviour,” said James Sethna, Professor at the Cornell University, US.

The algorithm allows researchers to image a large set of probabilities to look for patterns or other information that might be useful, and provides them with better intuition for understanding complex models and data.

In addition to cosmology, their model has applications to Machine Learning and statistical physics, which also work in terms of predictions.

galaxy, universe
Hubble’s view of a galaxy in Ursa Major, 65 million light-years away. VOA

To test the algorithm, the researchers used data from the European Space Agency’s Planck satellite, and studied it.

They applied the model data on the cosmic microwave background – radiation left over from the universe’s early days.

The model produced a map depicting possible characteristics of different universes, of which our own universe is one point.

Also Read: Researchers Develop AI-enabled Tool to Detect Heart Attacks

“This new method of visualising the qualities of our universe highlights the hierarchical structure of the dark energy and dark matter dominated model that fits the cosmic microwave background data so well,” said study co-author Michael Niemack.

“These visualisations present a promising approach for optimising cosmological measurements in the future,” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

AI-based Algorithm to Help Doctors Treat Traumatic Brain Injury

AI-based algorithm to treat brain injury developed

0
Artificial Intelligence brain
An AI-based algorithm will help doctors treat patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) based algorithm that could help doctors treat patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

The algorithms can predict the probability of the patient dying within 30-days with an accuracy of 80-85 per cent, said the study published in the journal Scientific Reports.

“A dynamic prognostic model like this has not been presented before. Although this is a proof-of-concept and it will still take some time before we can implement algorithms like this into daily clinical practice, our study reflects how and into what direction modern intensive care is evolving”, said Indian-origin researcher and study author Rahul Raj from Helsinki University Hospital in the Finland.

Traumatic brain injury is a significant global cause of mortality and morbidity with an increasing incidence, especially in low-and-middle income countries.

The most severe TBIs are treated in intensive care units (ICU), but in spite of the proper and high-quality care, about one in three patients dies.

Brain Injury
Traumatic brain injury is a significant global cause of mortality and morbidity. Pixabay

This is why researchers at Helsinki University Hospital (HUS) started to develop an artificial intelligence (AI) based algorithm that could help doctors treat patients with severe TBI.

At its best, such an algorithm could predict the outcome of the individual patient and give objective data regarding the condition and prognosis of the patient and how it changes during treatment.

“We have developed two separate algorithms. The first algorithm is simpler and is based only upon objective monitor data. The second algorithm is slightly more complex and includes data regarding the level of consciousness, measured by the widely used Glasgow Coma Scale score,” said study researcher Eetu Pursiainen.

As expected, the accuracy of the more complex algorithm is slightly better than for the simpler algorithm.

Also Read- Air Pollution Identified as a Life-threatening Illness: Study

“Still, the accuracy of both algorithms is surprisingly good, considering that the simpler model is based upon only three main variables and the more complex upon five main variables”, Pursiainen said.

In the future, the algorithms still have to be validated in national and international external datasets, the researchers concluded. (IANS)