Tuesday March 31, 2020

Alpha Brain Waves Responsible for Making Biased Decision

Scientists can see the bias in your brain

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Brain
The strength of alpha brain waves reveals if you are about to make a biased decision. Pixabay

The strength of alpha brain waves reveals if you are about to make a biased decision, says a new study. This is a health news.

According to the researchers, biases in sensory perception can arise from both experimental manipulations and personal trait-like features.

Everyone has bias, and neuroscientists can see what happens inside your brain as you succumb to it. The clue comes from alpha brain waves — a pattern of activity when the neurons in the front of your brain fire in rhythm together, they said.

Alpha brain waves pop up when people make decisions, but it remains unclear what their role is.

Brain
Everyone has bias, and neuroscientists can see what happens inside your brain as you succumb to it. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the journal JNeurosci, the researchers Laetitia Grabot and Christoph Kayser from the Bielefeld University in Germany, used electroencephalography to monitor the brain activity of adults while they made a decision.

According to the study, the participants saw a picture and heard a sound milliseconds apart and then decided which one came first.

Prior to the experiment, the researchers determined if the participants possessed a bias for choosing the picture or sound.

Before the first stimulus appeared, the strength of the alpha waves revealed how the participants would decide, the researchers said.

The study revealed that weaker alpha waves meant resisting the bias; stronger alpha waves indicated succumbing to the bias.

Also Read- Every Woman Should Know About These Contraceptive Measures

“These results also hold after temporal recalibration and are specific to the alpha band, suggesting that alpha band activity reflects, directly or indirectly, processes that help to overcome an individual’s momentary bias in perception,” the researchers wrote/

“We propose that combined with established roles of parietal alpha in the encoding of sensory information frontal alpha reflects complementary mechanisms influencing perceptual decisions,” the researchers added. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Women with Psychiatric Disorders Are Less Likely to Have Second Child

This contrasts with 82 per cent of mothers who did not experience psychiatric problems.

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psychiatric disorders
Researchers have claimed that women who suffer from psychiatric disorders are less likely to go on to have more children. Pixabay

Researchers have claimed that women who suffer from psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia following the live birth of their first child are less likely to go on to have more children.

The study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that 69 per cent of women who experienced postpartum psychiatric disorders within the first six months after the birth of their first baby went on to have further children. This contrasts with 82 per cent of mothers who did not experience psychiatric problems.

“We wanted to explore whether women with postpartum psychiatric disorders had a reduced possibility of having a second child. Furthermore, we considered whether a reduction in the live birth rate was due to personal choices or decreased fertility, as these are important issues to consider,” said study lead author Xiaoqin Liu from Aarhus University in Denmark.

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For the findings, the research team analysed data from Danish registries for 414,571 women who had their first live birth between 1997 and 2015 in Denmark. They followed the women for a maximum of 19.5 years until the next live birth, emigration, death, their 45th birthday or June 2016, whichever occurred first.

They identified women with postpartum psychiatric disorders by seeing if they were given prescriptions for psychotropic medications or had hospital contact for psychiatric disorders during the first six months after the live birth of their first child.

psychiatric disorders
The study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that 69 per cent of women who experienced postpartum psychiatric disorders within the first six months after the birth of their first baby went on to have further children. Pixabay

A total of 4,327 (one per cent) of women experienced psychiatric disorders following the birth of their first child, according to the study. These women were a third less likely to have a second live birth compared to women who did not experience psychiatric disorders. If the first child died, the difference in subsequent live birth rates disappeared.

However, if the psychiatric problem required hospitalisation, the likelihood of a woman having a second child nearly halved and this remained the case irrespective of whether the first child survived or not.

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“Although fewer women with postpartum psychiatric disorders had subsequent children, it is noteworthy that about 69 per cent of these women still chose to have a second child,” Dr Liu said.

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“For the remaining 31 per cent of women, we need to differentiate the reasons why they did not have another child. If they avoided another pregnancy due to fear of relapse, an important clinical message to them is that prevention of relapse is possible,” Liu added.

The researchers said that other possible explanations for the reduction in the subsequent live birth rate may be that women with postpartum psychiatric disorders are less able to conceive or have more problematic relationships with partners. (IANS)