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Amazon Plans to Use Self-Driving Drones to Deliver Packages in Months

“From paragliders to power lines to a corgi in the backyard, the brain of the drone has safety covered,” said Jeff Wilke, who oversees Amazon's retail business

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Gur Kimchi, Vice President of Amazon Prime Air, talks about Amazon's drone delivery service, Prime Air, during the Amazon re:MARS convention, June 5, 2019, in Las Vegas. VOA

Amazon said Wednesday that it plans to use self-driving drones to deliver packages to shoppers’ home in the coming months.

The online shopping giant did not give exact timing or say where the drones will be making deliveries. Amazon said its new drones use computer vision and machine learning to detect and avoid people or laundry clotheslines in backyards when landing.

“From paragliders to power lines to a corgi in the backyard, the brain of the drone has safety covered,” said Jeff Wilke, who oversees Amazon’s retail business. Wilke said the drones are fully electric, can fly up to 15 miles and carry packages that weigh up to five pounds.

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The new Amazon delivery drone is displayed on a screen during the Amazon Re:MARS conference on robotics and artificial intelligence in Las Vegas, Nevada, on June 5, 2019. VOA

Amazon has been working on drone delivery for years. Back in December 2013, Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos told the “60 Minutes” news show that drones would be flying to customer’s homes within five years. But that deadline passed due to regulatory hurdles.

ALSO READ: Scientists Use Drones to Detect Health of Migrating Whales in Australia

The Federal Aviation Administration, which regulates commercial use of drones in the U.S., did not immediately respond to a request for comment Wednesday. In April, a subsidiary of search giant Google won approval from the FAA to make drone deliveries in parts of Virginia. (VOA)

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Research Says, Drones can Deliver Medicines Faster During Rush Hours

The researchers found that during rush hours drones could reach critically ill patients three minutes faster than paramedics

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The researchers found that Drones arrived faster than ambulances when transportation times were compared during peak rush hour in Brooklyn, New York. Pixabay

Drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles, have the potential to save lives by delivering medicines faster than ambulances in crowded cities, especially during peak rush hours, new research has found.

“Drones, when used appropriately, represent the ideal marriage between enhanced pre-hospital care and telemedicine for our future,” said lead author Mark Hanna.

“This may prove to be profound in the unique pediatric setting.”

The researchers found that drones arrived faster than ambulances when transportation times were compared during peak rush hour in Brooklyn, New York.

If drones were equipped with two-way communication and possible life-saving interventions, they could save lives by responding to emergency conditions such as acute anaphylaxis, opiate overdose, asthma, cardiac arrest and sarin poisoning, said Hanna.

The analysis compared data for Emergency Medical Services and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) flight data within a zip code in urban Brooklyn, finding the drone response faster than the standard EMS ambulance response, especially during peak rush hours.

The UAV flight data was collected during actual flights recorded while flying under US Federal Aviation Administration and New York City laws in a commercially available drone, Hanna said.

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Drones, or unmanned aerial vehicles, have the potential to save lives by delivering medicines faster than ambulances in crowded cities, especially during peak rush hours, new research has found. Pixabay

The researchers found that during rush hours drones could reach critically ill patients three minutes faster than paramedics.

“Possible life saving interventions with first response associated with UAS can include acute anaphylaxis, opiate overdose, asthma, cardiac arrest, and sarin poisoning as these conditions have been associated with decreased mortality based on time to intervention by first responders,” said the research.

ALSO READ: Young Mothers Likely to Have Kids with ADHD: Study

The findings were scheduled to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans, Louisiana. (IANS)