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America under Trump needs to rethink what it will lose if it Curbs Indian immigrants

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Sundar Pichai, Indian American (CEO) of Google Inc. (Representational image). Wikimedia
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December 13, 2016: The number of Indians immigrating to America during the early 20th century was just a few hundred people. For xenophobes, that was obviously unbearable and in 1910, a government commission concluded that Indians were “the most undesirable of all Asiatics”.

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Today, probably the most successful minority group in the country is the Indian-born Americans as compared to other big foreign-born groups. They are comparatively successful, richer and very well educated. The first major study of how this whole transformation happened is well analysed in “The Other One Percent”.

India’s diaspora is vast and is spread across the world. After Britain abolished slavery, in the colonial times, many moved as laborers in order to build the east African railway. And after 1990, many moved to America when America’s immigration rules were relaxed.

According to The Economist, today, “half of all motels are owned by Indians, mainly Gujaratis. Whereas, Punjabis dominate the franchises for 7-Eleven stores and Subway sandwiches in Los Angeles.”

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In the tech industry, a quarter or more of the Indian-born workforce is employed. Not just that the tech start-ups mostly have Indian founders but also in the big firms Indians have made a place for themselves. Satya Nadella, the Microsoft’s boss, was born in Hyderabad, India. Also, Sundar Pichai, who runs Google is from Tamil Nadu.

The “The Other One Percent” however avoid explaining Indians’ success in America through their particular culture. Instead, it argues how “Indians cannot walk across a border to America due to different reasons like caste, class and only those who all have above average financial condition can afford to move to America.

It doesn’t even highlight how the gilded corner of the diaspora influences India.

According to The Economist, “The American-educated children of India’s governing elite probably helped push India to open up its economy in 1991. The tens of billions of dollars of income earned in America by India’s big technology firms is crucial for its balance of payments. And a new generation of entrepreneurs who have led a boom in e-commerce in India in the last five years is almost all American educated, or have worked for American technology firms.”

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If Donald Trump clamps down on immigration in America, the mutually beneficial will surely slow down.

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Sundar Pichai Clears Google’s China Centric Plans

Google had launched a search engine in China in 2006 but pulled the plug in 2010

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during a news conference in New Delhi. VOA

 Google CEO Sundar Pichai has for the first time gone public about his company’s China-centric plans and has stressed on its need to re-enter the Asian nation that has the world’s largest population, a media report said.

Pichai was speaking on Monday at Wired Magazine’s 25th anniversary summit here in the US.

Since China is an important market, Google is developing a censored search-engine for Beijing codenamed “Dragonfly” that would filter content deemed sensitive by its ruling Communist Party regime.

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif

“We wanted to learn what it would look like if Google were in China. It’s very early and we don’t know whether we would or could do this in China but we felt like it was important for us to explore, given how important the market is and how many users there are,” The Verge quoted Pichai as saying.

Information regarding Google’s “Dragonfly” project began surfacing in August and since then the company has faced severe backlash from its employees as well as the US government.

Google’s plan to launch the censored browser has come under heavy criticism from one of its former Asia-Pacific head of free expression who called it a “stupid move”.

In September, Google reportedly developed a prototype of “Dragonfly” that linked users’ search history to their personal phone numbers allowing security agencies to easily track users seeking out information banned by the government.

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Google’s plan to launch the censored browser has come under heavy criticism from one of its former Asia-Pacific head. VOA

Along with former Google Senior Scientist Jack Poulson, several other employees have resigned from the company citing lack of corporate transparency after it revealed its efforts about “Dragonfly”.

The company has been guarding the China-project details against the US Congress.

Appearing before members of the US Congress at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing in September end, Google’s Chief Privacy Officer, Keith Enright confirmed that the China search project does exist, but did not disclose much.

President Donald Trump’s administration has also asked Google to shun the “Dragonfly” project.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai
Google CEO Sundar Pichai. (Wikimedia Commons)

 

Though Pichai describes his company’s China plans as very preliminary, it is clear that backlash within and outside the company has been vocal and will only intensify in future, the report added.

Also Read: U.S. Government Warns People Against China-Linked Hacking Group

Google had launched a search engine in China in 2006 but pulled the plug in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech and block websites. (IANS)