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America under Trump needs to rethink what it will lose if it Curbs Indian immigrants

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Sundar Pichai, Indian American (CEO) of Google Inc. (Representational image). Wikimedia
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December 13, 2016: The number of Indians immigrating to America during the early 20th century was just a few hundred people. For xenophobes, that was obviously unbearable and in 1910, a government commission concluded that Indians were “the most undesirable of all Asiatics”.

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Today, probably the most successful minority group in the country is the Indian-born Americans as compared to other big foreign-born groups. They are comparatively successful, richer and very well educated. The first major study of how this whole transformation happened is well analysed in “The Other One Percent”.

India’s diaspora is vast and is spread across the world. After Britain abolished slavery, in the colonial times, many moved as laborers in order to build the east African railway. And after 1990, many moved to America when America’s immigration rules were relaxed.

According to The Economist, today, “half of all motels are owned by Indians, mainly Gujaratis. Whereas, Punjabis dominate the franchises for 7-Eleven stores and Subway sandwiches in Los Angeles.”

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In the tech industry, a quarter or more of the Indian-born workforce is employed. Not just that the tech start-ups mostly have Indian founders but also in the big firms Indians have made a place for themselves. Satya Nadella, the Microsoft’s boss, was born in Hyderabad, India. Also, Sundar Pichai, who runs Google is from Tamil Nadu.

The “The Other One Percent” however avoid explaining Indians’ success in America through their particular culture. Instead, it argues how “Indians cannot walk across a border to America due to different reasons like caste, class and only those who all have above average financial condition can afford to move to America.

It doesn’t even highlight how the gilded corner of the diaspora influences India.

According to The Economist, “The American-educated children of India’s governing elite probably helped push India to open up its economy in 1991. The tens of billions of dollars of income earned in America by India’s big technology firms is crucial for its balance of payments. And a new generation of entrepreneurs who have led a boom in e-commerce in India in the last five years is almost all American educated, or have worked for American technology firms.”

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If Donald Trump clamps down on immigration in America, the mutually beneficial will surely slow down.

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Company Doesn’t Use Customers’ Personal Data For Profit: Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

"Customers must be in control of their data. It is our collective responsibility to keep the data safe," the Microsoft CEO had emphasised in May

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Microsoft doesn't use customers' data for profit: Satya Nadella. (Wikimedia Commons)

In an apparent jibe against rivals Google and Facebook, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has said the company doesn’t use customers’ personal data for profit unlike some other firms.

In an interview with The Times on Monday, Satya Nadella said the company “had chosen not to squeeze the last drop of revenue from the troves of user data on its Bing search engine and the Linkedin social network, which it bought in 2016”.

LinkedIn, which Microsoft bought for $26 billion, has over 560 million users and Bing is the number 3 search engine globally.

“We don’t want to overmonetise. If anything, one of the things we’ve done is to is to make sure that the utility is maximised for the users,” Satya Nadella was quoted as saying.

Nadella’s comments “draw a sharp divide between Microsoft and other large American technology companies, which have been criticised for abusing the personal information of their users”.

At a Microsoft event in London last week, Satya Nadella called on technology companies to defend users’ privacy as human right, urging firms and governments to collectively work together to protect the most vulnerable section in society.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

Satya Nadella applauded the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) as first step towards securing data privacy.

“All of us will have to think about the digital experiences we create to treat privacy as a human right,” Nadella was quoted as saying.

“GDPR as a piece of legislation, a piece of regulation is a great start and we’ve done a lot of hard work to become compliant with GDPR.”

Amid increasing data breaches, tech giants are busy deliberating on how to ensure privacy and security for the users.

Also Read- WHO Ships Vaccination For Yellow Fever in Ethiopia

“Customers must be in control of their data. It is our collective responsibility to keep the data safe,” the Microsoft CEO had emphasised in May.

“We have the responsibility to ensure that the new-age technology is empowering everyone, creating equitable growth for all while creating employment on the global scale.” (IANS)