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STUDY – Americans Online Almost Everytime

A study reveals that Americans are online almost everytime

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Being online constantly isn't god for anyone.
Americans being online almost every time.
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More than 25 percent of Americans say they are online “almost constantly,” says a new report.

According to a Pew Research Center study conducted in January, 26 percent of American adults spend a lot of time online, up from 21 percent in 2015.

Pew also found that 77 percent report going online at least on a daily basis. Only 11 percent of American adults reported not using the internet at all.

Americans have been oberved being online almost everytime.
Americans are busy on their phones all time.

 

One reason for the increase in heavy internet use is the widespread use of smartphones. More than eight out of 10 American adults said they access the internet via smartphone “at least occasionally.” Eighty-nine percent of smartphone users reported going on the internet daily, and 31 percent said they are online almost constantly.

For Americans who access the internet via computers instead of with a mobile device, 54 percent are online daily, and only 5 percent are online a lot of the time.

Not surprisingly, younger adults are the leaders among those who report being constantly connected, with some 39 percent saying they’re online almost all the time. Almost half report going online many times a day. For older Americans over 65, only 8 percent reported being online constantly, and 30 percent use the internet multiple times a day.

Also Read: Recent Poll Reveals that 67% Americans Receive their News from Social Media

Americans between the ages of 30 and 49 report nearly the same levels of connectivity as young adults. Among those ages 50 to 64, 17 percent report being online nearly constantly, a jump of 5 percent from three years ago.

Groups reporting the most frequent internet use include “college-educated adults, black adults, adults who live in higher income households and nonrural residents,” Pew found.

More than one-third ((34 percent)) of those with a college education or more are online nearly constantly, compared to 20 percent of those with a high school education or less.

Among blacks, 37 percent reported they’re online nearly constantly, with 92 percent saying they’re connected at least daily. That compares to 30 percent of Hispanics and 23 percent of whites. Both blacks and Hispanics have seen increases in internet use, while for whites, it is stable.

Americans being online all the time.
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Income also makes a difference in how much time is spent online, Pew said, noting that 35 percent of American adults with a household income of $75,000 or more reported being online nearly constantly. For those making less than $30,000, that number was just 24 percent.

Urban and suburban Americans were more likely to be online all the time (27 percent), compared to their rural counterparts (15 percent).  VOA

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Americans Attention Shift From Gun Control

Americans Interest in Gun Control Drops

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Gun control
A man wears an unloaded pistol during a pro gun-rights rally at the state capitol, Saturday, April 14, 2018, in Austin, Texas. Gun rights supporters rallied across the United States to counter a recent wave of student-led protests against gun violence. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) VOA

In the wake of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Feb. 14, many Americans said gun control was the most important issue facing the country.

That has changed, despite high profile events like school walk outs and the March for Our Lives protests.

A recent Gallup public opinion poll found those who think gun control is the most important issue dropped from 13 percent, a record, to six percent in just one month.

Now, more Americans think dissatisfaction with government (23 percent), immigration (11 percent) and race relations (seven percent) are all more important than gun control.

Person holding a gun
A person holding a gun. Pixabay

Gallup noted gun control interest spikes after shootings, but the “effects have tended to be temporary.”   But the polling organization said interest in the topic of gun control remains “elevated by historical standards,” adding that since 2001, it has been mentioned, on average, by one percent of Americans as the top problem in the U.S.

In the immediate aftermath of the 2012 shooting in Sandy Hook, four percent of Americans said gun control was the top issue, a jump from zero percent.  Gallup said it remained high for a “few months” and even got as high as seven percent, but when Congress did not pass gun control legislation, the percentage of Americans saying gun control as the top issue dropped back to zero.

Also Read: Fast Food Habits of Americans

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Gallup found Democrats were twice as likely to think gun violence is among the most important issues compared to Republicans by eight to four percent respectively.  Democrats also saw the biggest drop in those saying guns were the top problem, dropping by half in just one month.

The Parkland shooting did spur the House of Representatives to pass “The STOP School Violence Act“, which authorizes $50 million per year to fund initiatives and otheThe Parkland shooting did spur the House of Representatives to pass “The r training aimed at enhancing school safety.  The bill would also provide $25 million to make schools less vulnerable by adding metal detectors, better door locks and response technologies to allow schools to notify law enforcement about emergencies.

The April Gallup poll contacted 1,015 adults, aged 18 and older, in all 50 states and Washington D.C. between April 2-11.  The margin of error is plus or minus four percentage points.  VOA

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