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STUDY – Americans Online Almost Everytime

A study reveals that Americans are online almost everytime

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Being online constantly isn't god for anyone.
Americans being online almost every time.

More than 25 percent of Americans say they are online “almost constantly,” says a new report.

According to a Pew Research Center study conducted in January, 26 percent of American adults spend a lot of time online, up from 21 percent in 2015.

Pew also found that 77 percent report going online at least on a daily basis. Only 11 percent of American adults reported not using the internet at all.

Americans have been oberved being online almost everytime.
Americans are busy on their phones all time.

 

One reason for the increase in heavy internet use is the widespread use of smartphones. More than eight out of 10 American adults said they access the internet via smartphone “at least occasionally.” Eighty-nine percent of smartphone users reported going on the internet daily, and 31 percent said they are online almost constantly.

For Americans who access the internet via computers instead of with a mobile device, 54 percent are online daily, and only 5 percent are online a lot of the time.

Not surprisingly, younger adults are the leaders among those who report being constantly connected, with some 39 percent saying they’re online almost all the time. Almost half report going online many times a day. For older Americans over 65, only 8 percent reported being online constantly, and 30 percent use the internet multiple times a day.

Also Read: Recent Poll Reveals that 67% Americans Receive their News from Social Media

Americans between the ages of 30 and 49 report nearly the same levels of connectivity as young adults. Among those ages 50 to 64, 17 percent report being online nearly constantly, a jump of 5 percent from three years ago.

Groups reporting the most frequent internet use include “college-educated adults, black adults, adults who live in higher income households and nonrural residents,” Pew found.

More than one-third ((34 percent)) of those with a college education or more are online nearly constantly, compared to 20 percent of those with a high school education or less.

Among blacks, 37 percent reported they’re online nearly constantly, with 92 percent saying they’re connected at least daily. That compares to 30 percent of Hispanics and 23 percent of whites. Both blacks and Hispanics have seen increases in internet use, while for whites, it is stable.

Americans being online all the time.
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Income also makes a difference in how much time is spent online, Pew said, noting that 35 percent of American adults with a household income of $75,000 or more reported being online nearly constantly. For those making less than $30,000, that number was just 24 percent.

Urban and suburban Americans were more likely to be online all the time (27 percent), compared to their rural counterparts (15 percent).  VOA

Next Story

U.S. Federal Appeals Court Wont Delay Talks About Net Neutrality

California agreed not to enforce its own state net neutrality law until the appeals court's decision on the 2017 repeal and any potential review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Net Neutrality
A sign with an emoji that reads "Don't take net neutrality away" is posted outside the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in Washington, Dec. 14, 2017. VOA

A federal appeals court said Thursday it would not delay oral arguments set for Feb. 1 on the Trump administration’s decision to repeal the 2015 landmark net neutrality rules governing internet providers.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Tuesday asked the court to delay the arguments over its December 2017 repeal, citing the partial government shutdown. Without comment, the court denied the request.

The FCC had no immediate comment on the decision.

A group of 22 state attorneys general and the District of Columbia have asked the court to reinstate the Obama-era internet rules and block the FCC’s effort to pre-empt states from imposing their own rules guaranteeing an open internet.

Net Neutrality
State Sen. Scott Wiener, D-San Francisco, left, receives congratulations from Assemblyman Rob Bonta, D-Alameda, center, and Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, right, after his net neutrality bill was approved by the state Senate. VOA

Several internet companies are also part of the legal challenge, including Mozilla Corp, Vimeo Inc and Etsy Inc, as well as numerous media and technology advocacy groups and major cities, including New York and San Francisco.

The FCC voted to reverse the rules that barred internet service providers from blocking or throttling traffic, or offering paid fast lanes, also known as paid prioritization.

The FCC said providers must disclose any changes in users’ internet access.

‘Misguided’ repeal

The net neutrality repeal was a win for providers like Comcast Corp, AT&T Inc and Verizon Communications Inc, but was opposed by internet companies like Facebook Inc, Amazon. com Inc and Alphabet Inc.

Major providers have not made any changes in how Americans access the internet since the repeal.

net neutrality
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks after signing a bill, March 5, 2018, in Olympia, Washington, that makes Washington the first state to set up its own net-neutrality requirements in response to the FCC’s recent repeal of Obama-era rules. VOA

FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat, said on Thursday that the lawsuits are aimed at overturning the agency’s “misguided” repeal of the Obama rules. “The fight for an open internet continues,” she wrote on Twitter.

Also Read: Google Probing ‘Malicious’ Attack on its Internet Traffic

The panel hearing the case is made up of Judges Robert Wilkins and Patricia Millett, two appointees of Barack Obama, and Stephen Williams, an appointee of Republican Ronald Reagan.

In October, California agreed not to enforce its own state net neutrality law until the appeals court’s decision on the 2017 repeal and any potential review by the U.S. Supreme Court. (VOA)