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STUDY – Americans Online Almost Everytime

A study reveals that Americans are online almost everytime

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Being online constantly isn't god for anyone.
Americans being online almost every time.
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More than 25 percent of Americans say they are online “almost constantly,” says a new report.

According to a Pew Research Center study conducted in January, 26 percent of American adults spend a lot of time online, up from 21 percent in 2015.

Pew also found that 77 percent report going online at least on a daily basis. Only 11 percent of American adults reported not using the internet at all.

Americans have been oberved being online almost everytime.
Americans are busy on their phones all time.

 

One reason for the increase in heavy internet use is the widespread use of smartphones. More than eight out of 10 American adults said they access the internet via smartphone “at least occasionally.” Eighty-nine percent of smartphone users reported going on the internet daily, and 31 percent said they are online almost constantly.

For Americans who access the internet via computers instead of with a mobile device, 54 percent are online daily, and only 5 percent are online a lot of the time.

Not surprisingly, younger adults are the leaders among those who report being constantly connected, with some 39 percent saying they’re online almost all the time. Almost half report going online many times a day. For older Americans over 65, only 8 percent reported being online constantly, and 30 percent use the internet multiple times a day.

Also Read: Recent Poll Reveals that 67% Americans Receive their News from Social Media

Americans between the ages of 30 and 49 report nearly the same levels of connectivity as young adults. Among those ages 50 to 64, 17 percent report being online nearly constantly, a jump of 5 percent from three years ago.

Groups reporting the most frequent internet use include “college-educated adults, black adults, adults who live in higher income households and nonrural residents,” Pew found.

More than one-third ((34 percent)) of those with a college education or more are online nearly constantly, compared to 20 percent of those with a high school education or less.

Among blacks, 37 percent reported they’re online nearly constantly, with 92 percent saying they’re connected at least daily. That compares to 30 percent of Hispanics and 23 percent of whites. Both blacks and Hispanics have seen increases in internet use, while for whites, it is stable.

Americans being online all the time.
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Income also makes a difference in how much time is spent online, Pew said, noting that 35 percent of American adults with a household income of $75,000 or more reported being online nearly constantly. For those making less than $30,000, that number was just 24 percent.

Urban and suburban Americans were more likely to be online all the time (27 percent), compared to their rural counterparts (15 percent).  VOA

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US Cancels A Planned Alcohol Study Over Trust Issues

NIH Director Francis Collins temporarily suspended the study

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A photo made with a fisheye lens shows bottles of alcohol in a liquor store in Salt Lake City. The National Institutes of Health said Friday that it was canceling a study of moderate drinking's health benefits because the results could not be trusted. Beer and liquor companies were helping to underwrite it.
This June 16, 2016, file photo, taken with a fisheye lens, shows bottles of alcohol during a tour of a state liquor store, in Salt Lake City. Cheap liquor, wine and beer have long been best-sellers among Utah alcohol drinkers, but new numbers from Utah's tightly-controlled liquor system show local craft brews, trendy box wines and flavored whiskies are also popular choices in a largely teetotaler state. VOA

The U.S. government is shutting down a planned study testing whether moderate drinking has health benefits over concerns that its funding by the alcohol industry would compromise its credibility.

The National Institutes of Health said Friday that the results of the planned $100 million study could not be trusted because of the secretive way that employees negotiated with beer and liquor companies to underwrite the effort.

Government officials say it is legal to use industry money to pay for government research as long as all rules are followed. However, in this case, NIH officials say employees did not follow proper procedures, including keeping their interactions with industry officials secret.

NIH Deputy Director Lawrence Tabak said the interactions between the employees and industry representatives appeared to “intentionally bias” the study so that it would have a better chance to conclude that moderate drinking is beneficial.

An NIH review panel was also concerned that the study’s proposed span of 10 years was too short a time period to adequately test the potential problems of a daily drink, such as an increased risk of cancer or heart failure.

Red wine
Red wine, Pixabay

NIH Director Francis Collins temporarily suspended the study last month after reporting by The New York Times first raised questions about the funding policy violations. Collins said Friday that he was completely shutting down the research.

“This is a matter of the greatest seriousness,’’ he said.

The study had planned to track two groups of people, one group drinking a glass of alcohol a day and another abstaining from alcohol. The study had planned to compare new cases of cardiovascular disease and the rate of new cases of diabetes among participants.

Some of the world’s largest alcoholic beverage makers, including Anheuser-Busch InBev and Heineken, had contributed to the study, although Anheuser-Busch InBev had recently withdrawn its contribution.

The NIH said of the $67.7 million raised from private donations, nearly all from the alcohol industry, $11.8 million, had been spent for the study.

Also read: New Link Found Between Alcohol, Genes And Heart Failure

The NIH’s National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) had planned to spend $20 million of its own money for the study. It said $4 million had been spent.(VOA)

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