Monday January 27, 2020

An I.I.T. student asks: is it really justified to hike fee at I.I.T. ?

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Image source: www.plancess.com

By Arpit Gupta

Being the student of Indian Institute of Technology(IIT) is a dream for most of the Indian youths who pursue education in science stream. Only a few thousands get selected and others have to accept the harsh reality of failure. After qualifying the JEE ADVANCED and getting accepted to an IIT, guardians think that their son/daughter will now be able to study on a nominal fee as he/she is in the most prestigious institute of India. The recent decision of fee hike at IITs has left those guardians disappointed. The question trending at the surface of the social media and in people’s mind is “whether this amount of fee is justifiable”?

I am a student of IIT and I know that we get the best possible facilities for everything we need. We are given every type of opportunity and exposure which is required to develop the skills for being a “near to perfect” engineering graduate. Every section of society has its representatives in IITs which helps in recognition of different cultures among the students. If we analyse the situation practically, we can easily say under these circumstances that the fee is totally justifiable. The recent fee hike of 122% i. e.  from Rs. 90,000 per annum to 2 lacs per annum is a good decision from the perspective of an expert. But then we forget that all(or most) of the students in IITs are from middle class and lower class. There has been a full fee waiver for students with parental income less than 1 lac per annum but the students with parental income between 1 to 5lacs will have to pay rs.67000 which is going to be a harsh situation for them.

When the analysis of an IITian’s life is done, the results are probably a bit surprising for the people outside the IIT campus. People think, it’s a well settled life with no any problem at all. For instance, I have a friend whose father is a salesman. His income is Rs.10,000 per month. He sold his farm/field and sent my friend to coaching so that he can get a secure and bright career. Now, if such a guy is to pay the fee of 67,000(one-third of the actual fee), Is it possible? Obviously, the loan from bank is possible but it’s not comfortable for everyone to get loans.

Probably, the fee hike will not affect the name and fame of IIT. IIT will continue to be considered to be equal to “Harvard+Stanford+MIT” but it is going to affect the proportion of middle class students in IIT. A senior professor from IIT during an informal interaction,  accepted the fact that the government has done wrong to the country only. If a guy enters in the IIT by taking loan, his whole sole motto will be to earn money because he would have already experienced the crisis of money. The guy will look for a good placement and will join foreign MNCs. This is going to harm India only. The economists and experts of HRD ministry have probably not thought about this aspect of the decision taken by them.

IIT is a place to explore skills and develop the personality. It’s the dream of a typical Indian youth who studies science. I know, the fee which is being taken, is again not the actual expenditure on the IITians. It’s much less but considering people’s emotions and the level of IIT in the world, government must rethink this decision in regards to the welfare of India and Indian people.

Arpit is an undergraduate student pursuing Mechanical Engineering at IIT-Roorkee. His twitter handle is: @Arpit2476667

  • sudheer naik

    Infrastructure of all IITs are not same. considering this perspective charges ought to be proportionate generally Govt will trick understudies

  • chakrs

    Please don’t fool yourself. IITs are not in any way equal to Harvard, Stanford or MIT, if you consider the discoveries made at these institutions. With this fee hike, IITs seem to be turning into self-financing undergraduate engineering colleges for the rich.

  • Pritam Go Green

    Seriously ? MIT+HArvard+Stanford ??? R u kidding me ?
    With all due respect Mr IITIAN, i humbly disagree. It is true that people studying in IITs are much more capable of but IITs stand nowhere if it comes to world class resources and facilities which are provided in Stanford+Harvard+MIT

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  • sudheer naik

    Infrastructure of all IITs are not same. considering this perspective charges ought to be proportionate generally Govt will trick understudies

  • chakrs

    Please don’t fool yourself. IITs are not in any way equal to Harvard, Stanford or MIT, if you consider the discoveries made at these institutions. With this fee hike, IITs seem to be turning into self-financing undergraduate engineering colleges for the rich.

  • Pritam Go Green

    Seriously ? MIT+HArvard+Stanford ??? R u kidding me ?
    With all due respect Mr IITIAN, i humbly disagree. It is true that people studying in IITs are much more capable of but IITs stand nowhere if it comes to world class resources and facilities which are provided in Stanford+Harvard+MIT

Next Story

Here’s how Smaller Class Sizes Affect Students’ Performance

Smaller class sizes not always better for students

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Smaller class
Smaller Class sizes can have a negative impact on students' achievement and performance. Pixabay

Researchers have found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

“This finding is perhaps due to the fact that class size effects are more likely to be detected in countries with limited school resources where teacher quality is lower on average,” said study researcher Spyros Konstantopoulos from Michigan State University in the US.

The precise effect of smaller class sizes can vary between countries, academic subjects, years, and different cognitive and non-cognitive skills, with many other factors likely playing a role, according to the study published in the journal Research Papers in Education.

Smaller class sizes in schools are generally seen as highly desirable, especially by parents. With smaller class sizes, teachers can more easily maintain control and give more attention to each pupil.

Smaller class room size
The precise effect of smaller class sizes can vary between countries, academic subjects, years, and different cognitive and non-cognitive skills. Pixabay

As such, many countries limit the maximum size of a class, often at around 30 pupils.

for the findings, the researchers decided to analyse data produced by the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).

Every four years since 1995, TIMSS has monitored the performance and achievement of fourth grade (age 9-10) and eighth grade (age 13-14) pupils from around 50 countries in mathematics and science.

It records pupils’ academic ability in these subjects and their self-reported attitude and interest in them, and also contains information on class sizes.

To make the analysis more manageable, the researchers limited it to data from eighth grade pupils in four European countries – Hungary, Lithuania, Romania and Slovenia – collected in 2003, 2007 and 2011.

They chose these four countries because they all mandate maximum class sizes, which would help to make the statistical analysis more reliable.

Despite these limitations, the data still encompassed 4,277 pupils from 231 classes in 151 schools, making it much larger than most previous studies on class size.

The analysis revealed that smaller class sizes were associated with benefits in Romania and Lithuania, but not in Hungary and Slovenia.

Smaller class sizes
Smaller class sizes in schools are generally seen as highly desirable, especially by parents. Pixabay

The beneficial effects were most marked in Romania, where smaller classes were associated with greater academic achievement in mathematics, physics, chemistry and earth science, as well as greater enjoyment of learning mathematics.

In Lithuania, however, smaller class sizes were mainly associated with improvements in non-cognitive skills such as greater enjoyment in learning biology and chemistry, rather than higher academic achievement in these subjects.

The beneficial effects were also only seen in certain years.

“Most class size effects were not different than zero, which suggests that reducing class size does not automatically guarantee improvements in student performance,” said Konstantopoulos.

“Many other classroom processes and dynamics factor in and have to work well together to achieve successful outcomes in student learning,” Konstantopoulos said.

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The researchers think smaller class sizes may have had greater beneficial effects on pupils in Romania and Lithuania than in Hungary and Slovenia because schools in Romania and Lithuania have fewer resources. (IANS)