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An Indian faces Racist comments by an 5-year-old in Singapore

After the racist incident, Vijayan wonders what “One People, One Nation, One Singapore" meant

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Racism.(Representational Image). Image source: www.atacrossroads.net
  • Vijayan, who grew up on the outskirts of Bendemeer Kampung, describes himself as “ a local breed Indian man”
  • Vijayan questions what “One People, One Nation, One  Singapore” means
  • Parents should educate their children and the way they are brought up matters

A Singaporean Indian decided to share his grievance about racism he encountered in Singapore. His post on Facebook opened up a dialogue that exposed how Indians are treated in Singapore.

Vijayan Superamaniam shared that the incident happened on June 15 while he was on his way to work at Changi Airport. After boarding the train at Pasir Ris, he sat on a ‘non-reserved’ seat. Despite having too many stuff to carry, Vijayan decided to give up his seat to a mother and her child, said theindependent.sg report.

Vijayan said that the child who was about 5 years old, looked at him and chuckled to her mother, “Mummy, Appu neh Neh, Black Black Man” and her mother grinned back at her in agreement, said Vijayan’s Facebook post.

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Vijayan Superamaniam.Image source: Vijayan Superamaniam's Facebook profile
Vijayan Superamaniam.Image source: Vijayan Superamaniam’s Facebook profile

Vijayan, who grew up on the outskirts of Bendemeer Kampung, describes himself as “ a local breed Indian man”. He now wonders if this is what “One People, One Nation, One  Singapore” meant.

Many of his friends too shared their grievances.

Yogeswari Chandrasekaran said, “God bless you for your big heart machan. I experienced the same thing before. The kid who sat beside me called me Appunehneh. I wonder what are kids taught nowadays!”

Paran Thechanamurthi, another Facebook user said, “it’s something that most of us face , but sadly it has and will never be addressed.”

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Many shared the opinion that parents should educate their children and the way the children are brought up matters.

Vijayan's Facebook Post Image Source:Facebook
Vijayan’s Facebook Post Image Source:Facebook

Prasath Dieg said,”Buddy buddy. It’s ok, I feel quite sad for the kids in fact because of the upbringing they are under. And I pity the kid’s grandparents for having to bring up such a mother too. Only Education can help the kids, not even God. Indian, Chinese, Malay, end of the day one blood. One day ah pu neh neh’s blood might be needed for donation etc.”

Another Facebook user, Michelle Nicholas said, “Dun wry bro.. in this country, all of us experience some racism at some point. No matter how educated this society is. All boils down to upbringing.. its what we decide to teach our kids.”

-prepared by Ajay Krishna an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    C’mon he is a small 5 year old child. How can he keep in mind all of this. Racism is something a 5 year old boy does not understand. You cannot question the upbringing of a child just because he said something childish to a person standing next to him because he found it fascinating. I agree the mother should’ve told him not to do that but after all he’s a kid, what do we expect?

  • Aparna Gupta

    Racism is banned in all countries. We cannot blame a child who is just 5 years old. He doesn’t say it deliberately.

  • devika todi

    in here, instead of blaming the 5 year old kid, why don’t we shine light on the mother’s behavior? when her kid made a racist comment, instead of rebuking her, she was smiling. she could have explained to her child and then apologized to the victim.
    children learn from what they see around them. in a tender age of 5, i don’t think terms like racism will make much sense to the kid. parents should be careful in this matter. the emerging world is much more tolerant towards such issues than it ever was before. don’t we all want to be part of a progressive world?

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    C’mon he is a small 5 year old child. How can he keep in mind all of this. Racism is something a 5 year old boy does not understand. You cannot question the upbringing of a child just because he said something childish to a person standing next to him because he found it fascinating. I agree the mother should’ve told him not to do that but after all he’s a kid, what do we expect?

  • Aparna Gupta

    Racism is banned in all countries. We cannot blame a child who is just 5 years old. He doesn’t say it deliberately.

  • devika todi

    in here, instead of blaming the 5 year old kid, why don’t we shine light on the mother’s behavior? when her kid made a racist comment, instead of rebuking her, she was smiling. she could have explained to her child and then apologized to the victim.
    children learn from what they see around them. in a tender age of 5, i don’t think terms like racism will make much sense to the kid. parents should be careful in this matter. the emerging world is much more tolerant towards such issues than it ever was before. don’t we all want to be part of a progressive world?

Next Story

Know Why Parents Should Worry About Their Daughters’ Perfect Selfies

Why parents should worry about girls' perfect selfies

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Adolescent girls who invest a lot of time in editing and selecting the selfies to post are mostly body insecure. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Researchers have recently found that adolescent girls who invest a lot of time in editing and selecting the perfect selfie may feel more body shame and appearance anxiety.

Published in the Journal of Children and Media, the research showed that when adolescent girls spend too much time agonising over which photo of themselves to post, or rely heavily on editing apps to alter their images, there may be a cause for concern.

The study found that selfie editing and time invested in creating and selecting the perfect one, were both related to self-objectification, which led to body shame, appearance anxiety and more negative appearance evaluations in teen girls.

“Our main finding was that we really shouldn’t be too worried about kids who take selfies and share them; that’s not where the negative effects come from. It’s the investment and the editing that yielded negative effects,” said senior study author Jennifer Stevens Aubrey from University of Arizona in the US.

“Selfie editing and selfie investment predicted self-objectification, and girls who self-objectify were more likely to feel shameful about their bodies or anxious about their appearance,” Aubrey added. The findings were based on a study of 278 teenage girls, ages 14 to 17.

selfies
“Our main finding was that we really shouldn’t be too worried about kids who take selfies and share them; that’s not where the negative effects come from,” said the researchers. Pixabay

They also responded to a series of statements designed to measure how much time and effort they spend selecting which selfies to share on social media – what researchers referred to in the paper as their level of “selfie investment.”

In addition, the girls completed a series of questionnaires designed to measure their levels of self-objectification and appearance concerns. The researchers said they chose to focus on adolescent girls because they are especially vulnerable to self-objectification.

Girls also are more likely than boys to experience negative consequences, such as body image issues, as the result of self-objectification, which can in turn lead to problems like depression and eating disorders, the researchers said. “Self-objectification is the pathway to so many things in adolescence that we want to prevent,” Aubrey said.

Also Read- Early Exposure of Infants To Household Cleaning Products Can Make Them Prone To Asthma

The researchers said parents and caregivers of adolescent girls should be aware of red flags on teens’ phones, such as selfie editing apps or camera rolls teeming with selfies. If a teen seems to be selfie-obsessed, it might be time for a talk, they added. (IANS)