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An Indian faces Racist comments by an 5-year-old in Singapore

After the racist incident, Vijayan wonders what “One People, One Nation, One Singapore" meant

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Racism.(Representational Image). Image source: www.atacrossroads.net
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  • Vijayan, who grew up on the outskirts of Bendemeer Kampung, describes himself as “ a local breed Indian man”
  • Vijayan questions what “One People, One Nation, One  Singapore” means
  • Parents should educate their children and the way they are brought up matters

A Singaporean Indian decided to share his grievance about racism he encountered in Singapore. His post on Facebook opened up a dialogue that exposed how Indians are treated in Singapore.

Vijayan Superamaniam shared that the incident happened on June 15 while he was on his way to work at Changi Airport. After boarding the train at Pasir Ris, he sat on a ‘non-reserved’ seat. Despite having too many stuff to carry, Vijayan decided to give up his seat to a mother and her child, said theindependent.sg report.

Vijayan said that the child who was about 5 years old, looked at him and chuckled to her mother, “Mummy, Appu neh Neh, Black Black Man” and her mother grinned back at her in agreement, said Vijayan’s Facebook post.

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Vijayan Superamaniam.Image source: Vijayan Superamaniam's Facebook profile
Vijayan Superamaniam.Image source: Vijayan Superamaniam’s Facebook profile

Vijayan, who grew up on the outskirts of Bendemeer Kampung, describes himself as “ a local breed Indian man”. He now wonders if this is what “One People, One Nation, One  Singapore” meant.

Many of his friends too shared their grievances.

Yogeswari Chandrasekaran said, “God bless you for your big heart machan. I experienced the same thing before. The kid who sat beside me called me Appunehneh. I wonder what are kids taught nowadays!”

Paran Thechanamurthi, another Facebook user said, “it’s something that most of us face , but sadly it has and will never be addressed.”

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Many shared the opinion that parents should educate their children and the way the children are brought up matters.

Vijayan's Facebook Post Image Source:Facebook
Vijayan’s Facebook Post Image Source:Facebook

Prasath Dieg said,”Buddy buddy. It’s ok, I feel quite sad for the kids in fact because of the upbringing they are under. And I pity the kid’s grandparents for having to bring up such a mother too. Only Education can help the kids, not even God. Indian, Chinese, Malay, end of the day one blood. One day ah pu neh neh’s blood might be needed for donation etc.”

Another Facebook user, Michelle Nicholas said, “Dun wry bro.. in this country, all of us experience some racism at some point. No matter how educated this society is. All boils down to upbringing.. its what we decide to teach our kids.”

-prepared by Ajay Krishna an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    C’mon he is a small 5 year old child. How can he keep in mind all of this. Racism is something a 5 year old boy does not understand. You cannot question the upbringing of a child just because he said something childish to a person standing next to him because he found it fascinating. I agree the mother should’ve told him not to do that but after all he’s a kid, what do we expect?

  • Aparna Gupta

    Racism is banned in all countries. We cannot blame a child who is just 5 years old. He doesn’t say it deliberately.

  • devika todi

    in here, instead of blaming the 5 year old kid, why don’t we shine light on the mother’s behavior? when her kid made a racist comment, instead of rebuking her, she was smiling. she could have explained to her child and then apologized to the victim.
    children learn from what they see around them. in a tender age of 5, i don’t think terms like racism will make much sense to the kid. parents should be careful in this matter. the emerging world is much more tolerant towards such issues than it ever was before. don’t we all want to be part of a progressive world?

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    C’mon he is a small 5 year old child. How can he keep in mind all of this. Racism is something a 5 year old boy does not understand. You cannot question the upbringing of a child just because he said something childish to a person standing next to him because he found it fascinating. I agree the mother should’ve told him not to do that but after all he’s a kid, what do we expect?

  • Aparna Gupta

    Racism is banned in all countries. We cannot blame a child who is just 5 years old. He doesn’t say it deliberately.

  • devika todi

    in here, instead of blaming the 5 year old kid, why don’t we shine light on the mother’s behavior? when her kid made a racist comment, instead of rebuking her, she was smiling. she could have explained to her child and then apologized to the victim.
    children learn from what they see around them. in a tender age of 5, i don’t think terms like racism will make much sense to the kid. parents should be careful in this matter. the emerging world is much more tolerant towards such issues than it ever was before. don’t we all want to be part of a progressive world?

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Facebook Is Planning To launch It’s Own Satellite ‘ATHENA’

A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila's mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet.

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Facebook is working on launching Athena, its own Internet satellite, early in 2019, the WIRED reported. Pixabay

 As part of its plan to connect billions of people who are still offline, Facebook is working on launching Athena, its own Internet satellite, early in 2019, the WIRED reported.

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Facebook also confirmed that Athena is their project, according to the report in the WIRED.

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The project is designed to “efficiently provide broadband access to unserved and underserved areas throughout the world,” the report said on Friday. Pixabay

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Facebook began Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight.

The social network also discontinued in 2017 a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge reported.

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