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An Indian faces Racist comments by an 5-year-old in Singapore

After the racist incident, Vijayan wonders what “One People, One Nation, One Singapore" meant

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Racism.(Representational Image). Image source: www.atacrossroads.net
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  • Vijayan, who grew up on the outskirts of Bendemeer Kampung, describes himself as “ a local breed Indian man”
  • Vijayan questions what “One People, One Nation, One  Singapore” means
  • Parents should educate their children and the way they are brought up matters

A Singaporean Indian decided to share his grievance about racism he encountered in Singapore. His post on Facebook opened up a dialogue that exposed how Indians are treated in Singapore.

Vijayan Superamaniam shared that the incident happened on June 15 while he was on his way to work at Changi Airport. After boarding the train at Pasir Ris, he sat on a ‘non-reserved’ seat. Despite having too many stuff to carry, Vijayan decided to give up his seat to a mother and her child, said theindependent.sg report.

Vijayan said that the child who was about 5 years old, looked at him and chuckled to her mother, “Mummy, Appu neh Neh, Black Black Man” and her mother grinned back at her in agreement, said Vijayan’s Facebook post.

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Vijayan Superamaniam.Image source: Vijayan Superamaniam's Facebook profile
Vijayan Superamaniam.Image source: Vijayan Superamaniam’s Facebook profile

Vijayan, who grew up on the outskirts of Bendemeer Kampung, describes himself as “ a local breed Indian man”. He now wonders if this is what “One People, One Nation, One  Singapore” meant.

Many of his friends too shared their grievances.

Yogeswari Chandrasekaran said, “God bless you for your big heart machan. I experienced the same thing before. The kid who sat beside me called me Appunehneh. I wonder what are kids taught nowadays!”

Paran Thechanamurthi, another Facebook user said, “it’s something that most of us face , but sadly it has and will never be addressed.”

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Many shared the opinion that parents should educate their children and the way the children are brought up matters.

Vijayan's Facebook Post Image Source:Facebook
Vijayan’s Facebook Post Image Source:Facebook

Prasath Dieg said,”Buddy buddy. It’s ok, I feel quite sad for the kids in fact because of the upbringing they are under. And I pity the kid’s grandparents for having to bring up such a mother too. Only Education can help the kids, not even God. Indian, Chinese, Malay, end of the day one blood. One day ah pu neh neh’s blood might be needed for donation etc.”

Another Facebook user, Michelle Nicholas said, “Dun wry bro.. in this country, all of us experience some racism at some point. No matter how educated this society is. All boils down to upbringing.. its what we decide to teach our kids.”

-prepared by Ajay Krishna an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    C’mon he is a small 5 year old child. How can he keep in mind all of this. Racism is something a 5 year old boy does not understand. You cannot question the upbringing of a child just because he said something childish to a person standing next to him because he found it fascinating. I agree the mother should’ve told him not to do that but after all he’s a kid, what do we expect?

  • Aparna Gupta

    Racism is banned in all countries. We cannot blame a child who is just 5 years old. He doesn’t say it deliberately.

  • devika todi

    in here, instead of blaming the 5 year old kid, why don’t we shine light on the mother’s behavior? when her kid made a racist comment, instead of rebuking her, she was smiling. she could have explained to her child and then apologized to the victim.
    children learn from what they see around them. in a tender age of 5, i don’t think terms like racism will make much sense to the kid. parents should be careful in this matter. the emerging world is much more tolerant towards such issues than it ever was before. don’t we all want to be part of a progressive world?

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    C’mon he is a small 5 year old child. How can he keep in mind all of this. Racism is something a 5 year old boy does not understand. You cannot question the upbringing of a child just because he said something childish to a person standing next to him because he found it fascinating. I agree the mother should’ve told him not to do that but after all he’s a kid, what do we expect?

  • Aparna Gupta

    Racism is banned in all countries. We cannot blame a child who is just 5 years old. He doesn’t say it deliberately.

  • devika todi

    in here, instead of blaming the 5 year old kid, why don’t we shine light on the mother’s behavior? when her kid made a racist comment, instead of rebuking her, she was smiling. she could have explained to her child and then apologized to the victim.
    children learn from what they see around them. in a tender age of 5, i don’t think terms like racism will make much sense to the kid. parents should be careful in this matter. the emerging world is much more tolerant towards such issues than it ever was before. don’t we all want to be part of a progressive world?

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Irish Watchdog Opens Inquiry into Latest Privacy Breach of Facebook

The private information of Facebook users was alleged to be used to influence the US 2016 general elections in favour of President Donald Trump's campaign

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Irish watchdog opens inquiry into latest Facebook privacy breach. Pixabay

Ireland’s Data Protection Commission (DPC) has announced a fresh investigation into Facebook, a day after the social networking giant admitted another security breach where nearly 6.8 million users risked their private photos being exposed to third-party apps.

Facebook, which is already facing a probe from the Irish watchdog for a previous privacy leak in September that affected 50 million people, may end up with fine of 4 per cent of its annual turnover – the highest fine under the new European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), The Independent reported on Saturday.

In Facebook’s case, the fine could amount to nearly 1.5 billion euros.

“The Irish DPC has received a number of breach notifications from Facebook since the introduction of the GDPR on May 25, 2018,” a spokesperson for the watchdog was quoted as saying.

The fresh move came after Facebook on Friday said more than 1,500 apps built by 876 developers may have also been affected by the bug that exposed users’ unshared photos during a 12-day-period from September 13 to 25.

Facebook, in a statement, said it has fixed the breach and will roll out next week “tools for app developers that will allow them to determine which people using their app might be impacted by this bug”.

“Currently, we believe this may have affected up to 6.8 million users and up to 1,500 apps built by 876 developers. The only apps affected by this bug were ones that Facebook approved to access the photos API and that individuals had authorised to access their photos.

Facebook, data
This photo shows a Facebook app icon on a smartphone in New York. VOA

“We’re sorry this happened,” said Facebook, adding that it will also notify the people potentially impacted by this bug via an alert.

The disclosure is another example of Facebook’s failure to properly protect users’ privacy that may drew more criticism of its privacy policy.

Earlier this month, Italian regulators fined Facebook 10 million euros for selling users’ data without informing them.

The competition watchdog handed Facebook two fines totalling 10 million euros, “also for discouraging users from trying to limit how the company shares their data”.

The Irish watchdog, which is Facebook’s lead privacy regulator in Europe, in October opened a formal investigation into a data breach which affected 50 million users.

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“The investigation will examine Facebook’s compliance with its obligation under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure the security and safeguarding of the personal data it processes,” said the DPC.

The world’s largest social media network has been grilled over the past year for its mishandling of user data, including its involvement in a privacy scandal in March when Cambridge Analytica, a British political consultancy firm, was accused of illegally accessing the data of more than 87 million Facebook users without their consent.

The private information of Facebook users was alleged to be used to influence the US 2016 general elections in favour of President Donald Trump’s campaign. (IANS)