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Indian-Origin Man Ramesh Krishnan Awarded $2.9 Million in Damages after a Scathing Reference by Ex Employer in Singapore

Ramesh Krishnan had accused AXA Life Insurance Singapore of defaming him while providing references on his work performance in 2012

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Ramesh Krishnan, Indian Origin man
An Indian-origin man got 4 million Singaporean dollars in damages due to bad reference. Pixabay
  • An Indian-origin man Ramesh Krishnan lost his initial defamation suit in 2015
  • The court had noted AXA’s breach of duty led Prudential Assurance Company Singapore not to hire Ramesh
  • The Court of Appeal said this would have given the mistaken impression that Ramesh was not competent

Singapore, August 17, 2017: An Indian-origin man here has got 4 million Singaporean dollars ($2.9 million) in damages from his previous employer after a scathing reference letter by them cost him the chance to get a new job.

Ramesh Krishnan had accused AXA Life Insurance Singapore of defaming him while providing references on his work performance in 2012, the Strait Times reported on Tuesday.

Justice George Wei noted on Monday that the stands of both parties had been “polar opposites” when it came to damages. Ramesh had sought 63 million Singaporean dollars, while AXA urged he should be awarded only a nominal sum of 1 Singaporean dollar.

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Krishnan lost his initial defamation suit in 2015, but the Court of Appeal later ruled that AXA had breached its duty of care to him, the report said.

AXA’s BREACH OF DUTY LED SINGAPORE FIRM NOT TO HIRE RAMESH

The court had also noted AXA’s breach of duty led Prudential Assurance Company Singapore not to hire Ramesh.

When the firm in which Krishnan had applied for a job asked AXA for the reference, it wrote back saying: “He showed a very poor 13th month persistency rate” – meaning that many of his clients did not stick with their policies – and “we are very concerned as to whether the clients have been provided with proper advice”.

The Court of Appeal said this would have given the mistaken impression that Ramesh was not competent, and did not square with the evidence that he was one of “AXA’s best financial services directors” and it had earlier persuaded him not to resign.

“People must know that justice is served. Somebody must go out there and make a point,” said Ramesh, after the ruling. (IANS)

 

Next Story

Scientists Produce Complex Glass From 3D Printing

The researchers can change various parameters in each layer, including pore size.

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3D printing or additive manufacturing
3D printing or additive manufacturing is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Pixabay

Creating glass objects using 3D printing is not easy but a groups of researchers including one of Indian-origin has now used a better technique to produce complex glass objects with addictive manufacturing.

Researchers from ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich) used the method based on stereolithography, one of the first 3D printing techniques developed during the 1980s.

David Moore, Lorenzo Barbera and Kunal Masania in the Complex Materials group led by ETH processor Andre Studart developed a special resin that contains a plastic and organic molecules to which glass precursors are bonded.

The resin can be processed using commercially available ‘Digital Light Processing’ technology.

This involves irradiating the resin with UV light patterns. Wherever the light strikes the resin, it hardens because the light sensitive components of the polymer resin cross link at the exposed points.

3D Printing of molecules in hand
This image shows molecules in hand. The molecular model appears on the computer screen, tumbling and turning in real time as the person holding the object manipulates it. Pixabay

The plastic monomers combine to form a labyrinth like structure, creating the polymer. The ceramic-bearing molecules fill the interstices of this labyrinth, said the team in a paper published in the journal Natural Materials.

An object can thus be built up layer by layer. The researchers can change various parameters in each layer, including pore size.

“We discovered that by accident, but we can use this to directly influence the pore size of the printed object,” said Masania.

These 3D-printed glass objects are still no bigger than a die. Large glass objects, such as bottles, drinking glasses or window panes, cannot be produced in this way “which was not actually the goal of the project,” emphasised Masania.

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The aim was rather to prove the feasibility of producing glass objects of complex geometry using a 3D printing process. However, the new technology is not just a gimmick.

The researchers applied for a patent and are currently negotiating with a major Swiss glassware dealer who wants to use the technology in his company. (IANS)