Wednesday September 19, 2018

Anaemia During Pregnancy Might Spike Up Risk of Heart Disease

They also found that high renal function at the end of pregnancy indicated a 1.5-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease

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Anaemia in pregnancy may signal heart disease, says study. Pixabay
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Gestational anaemia — lack of blood — in pregnancy may be a marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke later, a study has found.

Simple blood tests during pregnancy may reveal cardiovascular disease and stroke, up to 25 years before the disease outbreak, said researchers from Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University, in Israel.

In women with anaemia, CVD was 1.5 times higher than in women without anaemia. The rate of hospitalization for CVD was 4.35 per cent for women with gestational anaemia, compared to 3.7 per cent for the control group, the Xinhua reported.

The high risk of CVD was significant even after neutralising factors that might bias outcomes such as smoking, obesity, and hypertension disorders.

Among the diseases diagnosed in the pregnant patients are heart attacks, angina, heart failure, stroke, renal failure and hypertension with damage to internal organs.

Pregnancy
The high risk of CVD was significant even after neutralising factors that might bias outcomes such as smoking, obesity, and hypertension disorders. Pixabay

The study reinforces the need for use of iron products, not necessarily for immediate results but also for long-term complications. The researchers also recommend women with a longer-term follow-up anaemia to prevent recurrence of heart and blood vessel diseases, researchers said.

For the study, the team followed about 30,000 women with anaemia who gave birth at Soroka hospital between 1988 and 2014. The control group was over 50,000 women who gave birth in those years and did not suffer from anaemia.

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They also found that high renal function at the end of pregnancy indicated a 1.5-fold increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Among the blood tests found to be associated with a high risk of morbidity were creatinine and urea levels, a measure of kidney function, and potassium levels. (IANS)

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High Sugar Levels In Mothers Can Risk Obesity In Child: Study

Lowering a mother's blood sugar during her pregnancy reduces the birth weight of the child.

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Maternal high blood sugar linked to obesity risk in kids. Pixabay

Babies born to woman with higher blood sugar levels during pregnancy could be at significantly greater long-term risk of obesity – even more than a decade later, a study has found.

The higher the woman’s blood sugar, the greater the risk of her child being obese.

The researchers suspect that epigenetic changes are likely to be influencing these long-term outcomes and those changes begin quite early in pregnancy.

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Maternal high blood sugar linked to obesity risk in kids Pixabay

“The mother’s blood sugar level during pregnancy is an independent contributor to the child’s weight and risk of being obese later in childhood,” said Boyd Metzger, professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

In addition, mothers with higher-than-normal blood sugar during pregnancy — even if not at the level of gestational diabetes — also were significantly more likely to have developed Type-2 diabetes a decade after pregnancy than their counterparts without high blood sugar, the researchers said, in the paper published in the journal JAMA.

Lowering a mother’s blood sugar during her pregnancy reduces the birth weight of the child, as well as the risk of pre-eclampsia — potentially life-threatening condition in which the mother has high blood pressure that affects her and the baby.

Pregnancy
The higher the woman’s blood sugar, the greater the risk of her child being obese. Pixabay

If not regulated on time, these can potentially increase the number of women and children at risk of acquiring lifelong chronic medical conditions.

“The results are important because they demonstrate that even women with mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy and their offspring are at risk of harmful maternal and child health outcomes,” said coauthor Wendy Brickman, associate professor at Feinberg.

“Research is needed to identify interventions that will improve the health outcomes of these women and children,” Brickman said.

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The study evaluated children 10 to 14 years after birth in 10 clinical centers in seven countries: the US, Canada, Israel, the UK, Hong Kong, Thailand and Barbados.

The study included 4,697 mothers and 4,832 children. (IANS)