Monday October 21, 2019

Anger More Harmful Than Sadness for Older Adults, Claim Researchers

During the study, participants completed questionnaires about how angry or sad they felt

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Anger Issues
Anger Issues. Pixabay

Anger is more harmful than sadness for older adults and may lead to health complications — potentially increased inflammation which is associated with chronic illnesses like heart disease, arthritis and cancer, say researchers.

The study, published in the journal Psychology and Aging, shows that anger can lead to the development of chronic illnesses whereas sadness did not.

“Sadness may help older seniors adjust to challenges such as age-related physical and cognitive declines because it can help them disengage from goals that are no longer attainable”, said study lead author Meaghan A Barlow from the Concordia University in the US.

For the study, the researchers analysed data from 226 older adults ages 59 to 93 from Montreal, Canada and grouped participants as being in early old age (59 to 79 years old) or advanced old age (80 years or older).

During the study, participants completed questionnaires about how angry or sad they felt.

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The researchers suggest that education and therapy might help older adults reduce anger by regulating their emotions.

The research examined whether anger and sadness contributed to inflammation, an immune response by the body to perceived threats, such as infection or tissue damage.

“We found that experiencing anger daily was related to higher levels of inflammation and chronic illness for people aged 80 or above, but not for younger seniors,” added study co-author Carsten Wrosch.

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“Younger seniors may be able to use that anger as fuel to overcome life’s challenges and emerging age-related losses and that can keep them healthier”, Barlow added.

The researchers suggest that education and therapy might help older adults reduce anger by regulating their emotions or by offering better coping strategies to manage the inevitable changes that accompany ageing. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers to Figure Out Mechanism of Aging Process to Find Ways to Help People Stay Healthy for Longer

"We are not trying to cheat death, but help people be healthy and disease-free in their final years," said Linda Partridge, a professor

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Researchers, Mechanism, Aging
A fruit fly is seen in a laboratory at the Bar-Ilan University, in Ramat Gan, Israel, May 1, 2018. VOA

Scientists who gave fruit flies a triple drug combination treatment and found that it extended their lives by almost 50% say their work offers clues on how to fight aging in people. Researchers.

The researchers said their aim is not to find the secret of eternal life, but to figure out the mechanism of the aging process to find ways to help people stay healthy for longer.

“We are not trying to cheat death, but help people be healthy and disease-free in their final years,” said Linda Partridge, a professor at University College London’s Institute of Healthy Ageing and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing who co-led the work.

The three drugs – the mood stabilizer lithium, a cancer treatment called trametinib and an immune regulator called rapamycin – target different cellular processes and had a “quite remarkable” impact on the flies’ lifespans, the scientists said.

Researchers, Mechanism, Aging
The researchers said their aim is not to find the secret of eternal life, but to figure out the mechanism of the aging process to find ways to help people stay healthy for longer. Pixabay

And since the three drugs are all already in use as medical treatments, they are known to be safe to use in people, we have found that a combination drug treatment … may be an effective way to slow down the aging process,” said Jorge Castillo-Quan, who co-led the research.

Partridge said the findings add to growing evidence that so-called polypills — pills that combine low doses of multiple drugs — could one day help prevent age-related diseases.

“This may be possible by combining the drugs we’re investigating with other promising drugs, but there is a long way to go,” she said.

This research adds to previous studies finding that individually, lithium, trametinib and rapamycin can each extend lifespan in fruit flies. That evidence has also been supported by further studies in mice and worms, the scientists said.

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In this study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, Castillo-Quan’s team gave fruit flies doses of the three drugs separately and in combination.

Each drug individually extended lifespan by an average of 11%, they found, and pairing two drugs extended lifespan by around 30%. But when all three were combined, the fruit flies lived 48% longer than flies that did not get the treatment.

“We found it was quite remarkable that this drug combination enabled them to live 48% longer,” said Castillo-Quan, who now works at Harvard Medical School in the United States.

The researchers said they plan to conduct more studies to try to decipher exactly how the drugs work in combination with each other. They hope to move on to experiments in more complex animals, such as mice, to gauge the effects on the entire body before eventually progressing to human trials. (VOA)