Thursday May 23, 2019

Anger More Harmful Than Sadness for Older Adults, Claim Researchers

During the study, participants completed questionnaires about how angry or sad they felt

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Anger Issues
Anger Issues. Pixabay

Anger is more harmful than sadness for older adults and may lead to health complications — potentially increased inflammation which is associated with chronic illnesses like heart disease, arthritis and cancer, say researchers.

The study, published in the journal Psychology and Aging, shows that anger can lead to the development of chronic illnesses whereas sadness did not.

“Sadness may help older seniors adjust to challenges such as age-related physical and cognitive declines because it can help them disengage from goals that are no longer attainable”, said study lead author Meaghan A Barlow from the Concordia University in the US.

For the study, the researchers analysed data from 226 older adults ages 59 to 93 from Montreal, Canada and grouped participants as being in early old age (59 to 79 years old) or advanced old age (80 years or older).

During the study, participants completed questionnaires about how angry or sad they felt.

Couples have tough time understanding soft negative emotions like sadness, loneliness of each other: Study.
The researchers suggest that education and therapy might help older adults reduce anger by regulating their emotions.

The research examined whether anger and sadness contributed to inflammation, an immune response by the body to perceived threats, such as infection or tissue damage.

“We found that experiencing anger daily was related to higher levels of inflammation and chronic illness for people aged 80 or above, but not for younger seniors,” added study co-author Carsten Wrosch.

Also Read- Cyber Bullying Leads to Depression in Teenagers, Says Study

“Younger seniors may be able to use that anger as fuel to overcome life’s challenges and emerging age-related losses and that can keep them healthier”, Barlow added.

The researchers suggest that education and therapy might help older adults reduce anger by regulating their emotions or by offering better coping strategies to manage the inevitable changes that accompany ageing. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Find Cocaine in UK Shrimp

Scientists have found evidence that they are entering the human body, with microplastics in human stools for the first time in 2018

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modern slavery
A government raid empties a shrimp shed in Samut Sakhon, Thailand. Slavery has often been considered an acceptable business practice in the country's seafood export capital. (VOA)

Researchers in the UK have found cocaine, pharmaceuticals and pesticides in all samples of freshwater shrimp in a rural area of eastern England.

Scientists from King’s College London and the University of Suffolk tested the exposure of freshwater shrimp to different micropollutants at 15 different sites in the county of Suffolk.

Scientists were surprised to find illicit drugs in the samples in rural England, with ketamine also widespread. The full results of the study were published in the journal Environment International.

“Such regular occurrence of illicit drugs in wildlife was surprising,” Leon Barron from King’s College London said in a press release.

“We might expect to see these in urban areas such as London, but not in smaller and more rural catchments.”

Researchers also found traces of fenuron, a pesticide that has long been banned in the UK, added Barron, who said that the sources of the chemical are not clear.

Cocaine. Wikimedia commons

“Although concentrations were low, we were able to identify compounds that might be of concern to the environment and crucially, which might pose a risk to wildlife,” said Thomas Miller from King’s College London.

“The impact of ‘invisible’ chemical pollution (such as drugs) on wildlife health needs more focus in the UK as policy can often be informed by studies such as these,” said Nic Bury from the University of Suffolk.

High levels of benzoylecgonine, the main metabolite of cocaine, have previously been detected in wastewater in London.

Also Read- Three Tombs Discovered Under Egypt’s Great Pyramids

Microplastics are also a concern, with the tiny plastic particles being found inside fish, sea turtles and even flying insects, the researchers said.

Scientists have found evidence that they are entering the human body, with microplastics in human stools for the first time in 2018. (IANS)