Saturday November 17, 2018
Home India Angry Village...

Angry Villagers set Truck on Fire in Mathura after they saw Cow’s blood spilling out of it

The blockade was lifted when police ensured the villagers that the culprits will be punished according to National Security Act

1
//
Cows in a truck. (Representational Image) Image source: cilisos.my
Republish
Reprint
  • A truck carrying bovines overturned, killing 11 cows and injuring around 12
  • Villagers set the truck on fire in a fit of rage as Cow is considered sacred in Hinduism
  • A total of 30 cows were found dead in the truck

It has been nine months since Dadri mob lynching Mohammad Akhlaq was killed only on doubt of consuming cow’s meat (beef). There has been several incidents which highlights rise in Intolerance in India. There were several incidents of violence in past years on name of religion.

These incidents of violence are not new when it comes to religion. Recently, a truck was set ablaze on fire by people. It all started when villagers of Chaumuhan area in Mathura in Uttar Pradesh saw blood dripping from the truck. They stopped the truck and removed the plastic cover. They were shocked that the truck was carrying dead bodies of around thirty cows.

“A total of 30 cows were found dead in the truck,” SDM Chatta, Vishwa Bhusan Mishra quoted Zee news.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @NewsGram1

According to Zee News report, the villagers set the truck on fire in a fit of rage as Cow is considered sacred in Hinduism. After that they started protesting and demanded arrest of culprits and blocked National Highway 2. After that Deputy SP Chatta, Peeyush Kumar, Dy SP Mathura, Chakrapani Tripathi along with Mishra went to the spot immediately accompanied with heavy police force.

Violence in Mathura. Image source: PTI
Violence in Mathura. Image source: PTI

The blockade was lifted when police ensured the villagers that the culprits will be punished according to National Security Act.

On June 2 2016, a similar kind of incident took place when a truck carrying bovines overturned, killing 11 cows and injuring around 12. The truck was coming from Agra and when villagers saw that the cows are killed, they set the truck on fire.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram

The villagers also set fire on two wheelers and four wheelers in that area. The truck driver and other flee from the spot. Police has a doubt that they all were smugglers and is carrying on the probe.

Cow slaughter (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Cow slaughter (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Last year UP’s district Mainpuri countered the same problem on rumors of cow slaughter in that area. Villagers set the nearby vehicles on fire and threw stones on both of them. After that ADG confirmed that there was no signs of cow slaughter.

“No injury or cut marks were found on the carcass. The two men who were ferrying the dead cow have been booked under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act nonetheless and further probes are on.” ADG Daljit Singh quoted Times of India.

-This report is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ:

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    This doesn’t prove that the accident was religious. It was just an accident. This shouldn’t be taken to any other level

Next Story

Should Promote Human Rights More In Myanmar: Facebook

Facebook has roughly 20 million users in Myanmar, according to BSR, which warned Facebook faces several unresolved challenges in Myanmar.

0
Facebook, myanmar
A cellphone user looks at a Facebook page at a shop in Latha street, Yangon, Myanmar. VOA

Facebook on Monday said a human rights report it commissioned on its presence in Myanmar showed it had not done enough to prevent its social network from being used to incite violence.

The report by San Francisco-based nonprofit Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) recommended that Facebook more strictly enforce its content policies, increase engagement with both Myanmar officials and civil society groups and regularly release additional data about its progress in the country.

“The report concludes that, prior to this year, we weren’t doing enough to help prevent our platform from being used to foment division and incite offline violence. We agree that we can and should do more,” Alex Warofka, a Facebook product policy manager, said in a blog post.

facebook, U.S., myanmar
A protester wearing a mask with the face of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, in between men wearing angry face emoji masks, is seen during a demonstration against Facebook outside Portcullis in London. VOA

BSR also warned that Facebook must be prepared to handle a likely onslaught of misinformation during Myanmar’s 2020 elections, and new problems as use of its WhatsApp grows in Myanmar, according to the report, which Facebook released.

A Reuters special report in August found that Facebook failed to promptly heed numerous warnings from organizations in Myanmar about social media posts fueling attacks on minority groups such as the Rohingya.

In August 2017 the military led a crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents, pushing more than 700,000 Muslims to neighboring Bangladesh, according to U.N. agencies.

Rohingya, India, myanmar
A man from the Rohingya community fills out an identification form provided by local police inside his shop at a camp in New Delhi. VOA

 

The social media website in August removed several Myanmar military officials from the platform to prevent the spread of “hate and misinformation,” for the first time banning a country’s military or political leaders.

It also removed dozens of accounts for engaging in a campaign that “used seemingly independent news and opinion pages to covertly push the messages of the Myanmar military.”

The move came hours after United Nations investigators said the army carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Muslim Rohingya with “genocidal intent.”

Facebook said it has begun correcting shortcomings.

myanmar, facebook
A deforested section of the Chakmakul camp for Rohingya refugees clings to a hillside in southern Bangladesh, Feb. 13, 2018. VOA

Facebook said that it now has 99 Myanmar language specialists reviewing potentially questionable content. In addition, it has expanded use of automated tools to reduce distribution of violent and dehumanizing posts while they undergo review.

Also Read: Video: Orange Rallies in US Honor Victims of Gun Violence

In the third quarter, the company said it “took action” on about 64,000 pieces of content that violated its hate speech policies. About 63 percent were identified by automated software, up from 52 percent in the prior quarter.

Facebook has roughly 20 million users in Myanmar, according to BSR, which warned Facebook faces several unresolved challenges in Myanmar.

BSR said locating staff there, for example, could aid in Facebook’s understanding of how its services are used locally but said its workers could be targeted by the country’s military, which has been accused by the U.N. of ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. (VOA)