Tuesday November 19, 2019
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Animal Australian Rescuers Find Birds Falling Out of The Sky

Both long-billed corellas - which is a protected species in South Australia - and short-billed corellas were among those found

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Animal, Australian, Rescuers
The birds were found dead or dying near One Tree Hill Primary School on Wednesday. Pixabay

Dozens of corellas were believed to have been poisoned after animal Australian rescuers found more than 60 of the birds “falling out of the sky” near an Adelaide primary school, the media reported on Friday.

The birds were found dead or dying near One Tree Hill Primary School on Wednesday, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported.

Both long-billed corellas – which is a protected species in South Australia – and short-billed corellas were among those found.

A volunteer from Casper’s Bird Rescue who went to investigate reports of the dead birds called for help when the birds were found.

Animal, Australian, Rescuers
Dozens of corellas were believed to have been poisoned after animal Australian rescuers found more than 60 of the birds “falling out of the sky” near an Adelaide primary school. Pixabay

Casper’s Bird Rescue founder Sarah King said she did not believe any of the birds had survived.

“I got a phone call from that carer quite distressed saying they are literally everywhere falling out of the trees, falling out of the sky,” she told ABC Adelaide.

“The scene looked like a horror movie.”

The deaths are being investigated by government departments.

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Some of the birds were found in distress and taken to two veterinarians, but they were unable to be saved.

One veterinarian who saw the birds, Trudy Seidel, told the ABC that “more than likely they have been poisoned”.

The state’s Department for Environment and Water said the cause was not yet confirmed.

“Disease and toxin testing is under way and will take several weeks to complete,” a spokeswoman told the BBC. (IANS)

Next Story

Replace Animal Protein in Diet with Crickets, Ants, Cockroaches, Beetles and Other Insects

The United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has counted more than 1,900 insect species that are edible

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Animal, Protein, Diet
Gabriela Soto prepares insects for lunch, while her husband biologist Federico Paniagua (unseen) promotes the ingestion of a wide variety of insects as a low-cost and nutrient-rich food, in Grecia, Costa Rica, July 13, 2019. VOA

At his home in rural Costa Rica, biologist Federico Paniagua joined his family at the dining table to devour several types of insects that he raised on his farm and whose flavor he compares to potato chips. Animal.

The head of the University of Costa Rica’s Insects Museum decided three years ago to replace animal protein in his diet with crickets, ants, cockroaches, beetles and other insects – and wants to encourage others to do the same.

“Insects are delicious,” he said in an interview at his farm in Sarchi, about 30 miles (50 km) from the capital San Jose.

“You can sit and watch a soap opera, watch the football game, do any activity with a plate full of insects. Eat them one by one, with a glass of soda… they’ll go down well,” said Paniagua.

Animal, Protein, Diet
Biologist Federico Paniagua eats a cricket during lunch while promoting the ingestion of a wide variety of insects as a low-cost and nutrient-rich food, in Grecia, Costa Rica, July 13, 2019. VOA

The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has counted more than 1,900 insect species that are edible.

Especially in Asia and in Africa, the tiny creatures are touted as delicacies packed with vitamins, minerals and energy.

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Their proponents also note that bugs emit fewer greenhouse gases and less ammonia than cattle or pigs and require significantly less land and water than cattle.

Paniagua’s wife, Gabriela Soto, prepared their meal by splashing oil in a frying pan, adding the farm-raised insects and topping them off with a dash of salt.

Animal, Protein, Diet
An African cockroach is pictured in the insect farm for human consumption of the biologist Federico Paniagua, as he is promoting the ingestion of a wide variety of insects, as a low-cost and nutrient-rich food in Grecia, Costa Rica, June 22, 2019. VOA

She then brought out several dishes to her young daughter, who reached into a plate with her hands and munched fearlessly, and husband, who suggested a bit of lemon would enhance their flavor.

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“They are going to taste like potato chips… you can eat basically a whole plate of these insects,” Paniagua said. (VOA)