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Animal Australian Rescuers Find Birds Falling Out of The Sky

Both long-billed corellas - which is a protected species in South Australia - and short-billed corellas were among those found

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Animal, Australian, Rescuers
The birds were found dead or dying near One Tree Hill Primary School on Wednesday. Pixabay

Dozens of corellas were believed to have been poisoned after animal Australian rescuers found more than 60 of the birds “falling out of the sky” near an Adelaide primary school, the media reported on Friday.

The birds were found dead or dying near One Tree Hill Primary School on Wednesday, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported.

Both long-billed corellas – which is a protected species in South Australia – and short-billed corellas were among those found.

A volunteer from Casper’s Bird Rescue who went to investigate reports of the dead birds called for help when the birds were found.

Animal, Australian, Rescuers
Dozens of corellas were believed to have been poisoned after animal Australian rescuers found more than 60 of the birds “falling out of the sky” near an Adelaide primary school. Pixabay

Casper’s Bird Rescue founder Sarah King said she did not believe any of the birds had survived.

“I got a phone call from that carer quite distressed saying they are literally everywhere falling out of the trees, falling out of the sky,” she told ABC Adelaide.

“The scene looked like a horror movie.”

The deaths are being investigated by government departments.

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Some of the birds were found in distress and taken to two veterinarians, but they were unable to be saved.

One veterinarian who saw the birds, Trudy Seidel, told the ABC that “more than likely they have been poisoned”.

The state’s Department for Environment and Water said the cause was not yet confirmed.

“Disease and toxin testing is under way and will take several weeks to complete,” a spokeswoman told the BBC. (IANS)

Next Story

Australian Scientists Determines Precise Location of Cosmic Radio Waves

Having discovered that the burst originated on the outskirts of a Milky Way-sized galaxy 3.6 billion light years from Earth

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Australian, Scientists, Cosmic
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) on Friday revealed that it made the discovery using its new Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. Pixabay

In a first, a team of Australian scientists has determined the precise location of a powerful one-off burst of cosmic radio waves.

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) on Friday revealed that it made the discovery using its new Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope in Western Australia, Xinhua news agency reported.

Having discovered that the burst originated on the outskirts of a Milky Way-sized galaxy 3.6 billion light years from Earth, researchers were then able to image that galaxy using three of the world’s largest optical telescopes.

“This is the big breakthrough that the field has been waiting for since astronomers discovered fast radio bursts in 2007,” Keith Bannister, the lead author from the CSIRO, said in a media release.

Australian, Scientists, Cosmic
In a first, a team of Australian scientists has determined the precise location of a powerful one-off burst of cosmic radio waves. Pixabay

In the 12 years since the radio bursts were first detected scientists across the world have detected another 85 bursts, most of which were “one-offs”.

The source of one of the few “repeater” bursts was discovered in 2017 but localising a one-off burst has proved more challenging because they last for only a millisecond.

In order to make the discovery Bannister’s team developed technology that can freeze and save data detected by the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder less than a second after it is detected.

“From these tiny time differences, just a fraction of a billionth of a second, we identified the burst’s home galaxy and even its exact starting point, 13,000 light years out from the galaxy’s centre in the galactic suburbs,” said team member Adam Deller of Swinburne University of Technology in Australia.

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“It comes from a massive galaxy that is forming relatively few stars. This suggests that fast radio bursts can be produced in a variety of environments, or that the seemingly one-off bursts detected so far by ASKAP are generated by a different mechanism to the repeater.”

The results were published online in the journal Science. (IANS)