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Second Lt. Anmol Narang, is a second-generation immigrant born and raised in Roswell, Georgia. TribuneIndia

Anmol Narang has left a mark on the world by becoming the first observant Sikh to graduate from the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point. She’s a symbol of pride to her community and is confident that her endeavors to represent religion and kind will urge Americans to become familiar with Sikhism. US President Donald Trump recently tended to the 1,107 graduates which included the 23-year-old Sick girl Narang, they had assembled for the foundation’s yearly beginning.

A second-generation migrant brought up in Roswell, Georgia, Narang had been eager to join the military as she had been inspired by her maternal granddad’s service in the Indian Army. After she built up an enthusiasm for military help during secondary school, she started the procedure to apply for the West Point after her family visited Pearl Harbor National Memorial in Honolulu, Hawaii.


In an interview with media Narang said, “It’s an incredible feeling. It’s a humbling experience, I have never worked harder for anything in my life. Being a Sikh woman is a very important part of my identity and if my experience can play a small role in being an inspiration for others, regardless of the career field, that will be wonderful”

At Saturday’s service, all graduates were socially separated 6 feet from each other over the Plain Parade Field to suit COVID-19 norms and wellbeing necessities. Loved ones were not permitted to go to the service however they could watch it on the web, a report suggested. President Trump encouraged the graduates by saying that, the premier military academy produces only the best of the best—the strongest of the strong—and the bravest of the brave. West Point is a universal symbol of American gallantry, loyalty, devotion, discipline, and skill, he further added. He congratulated the 1,107 graduates who became the freshest officials in the most extraordinary Army.

Even though many Sikhs have graduated from the academy, that Narang is the first observant to graduate from West Point. She trusts that her endeavors represent her religion and people will urge Americans to study more about Sikhism which is the fifth biggest religion on the planet.


Narang has made history by becoming the first observant Sikh to graduate from the prestigious United States Military Academy at West Point. Pixabay

In 1987, the US Congress passed a law that restricted Sikhs and a few different strict networks from keeping up their articles of confidence while in the military, in spite of a past filled with various assistance and basic housing. The Sikh Coalition said that for a long time, the obvious Sikh articles of confidence—including unshorn facial hair and turbans—were prohibited, in spite of being center fundamentals of the confidence.

Accordingly, for over 10 years, the Sikh Coalition has driven a crusade, in association with other Sikh and social liberties associations, prosecution accomplices, and similarly invested advocates, to guarantee correspondence of chance for Sikhs Americans in the US Armed Forces. Simratpal Singh, US Army Captain and a family companion of Narang commented on her achievement by saying, “I am massively pleased with (Second Lieutenant) Narang for overseeing her objective and, in doing as such, breaking an obstruction for any Sikh American who wishes to serve,”

“The broader acceptance of Sikh service members among all of the service branches, as well as in top tier leadership spaces like West Point, will continue to benefit not just the rights of religious minority individuals, but the strength and diversity of the US military,” Singh said in a statement.,” he further added

Singh’s 2016 suit over his own entitlement to keep up his articles of confidence in uniform prodded a basic change in the Army’s lodging strategy in 2017, which smoothed out the facilities procedure for Sikh officers and guaranteed that housing would remain with them all through their profession. In 2020, subsequent to giving a progression of individual facilities to Sikh aviators during the time earlier, the US Air Force actualized a likewise refreshed arrangement.


Narang is hopeful that her efforts to represent her religion and community will encourage Americans to learn more about Sikhism. WikimediaCommons

Since the Army and the Air Force changed their arrangements, in any event, 60 perceptive Sikhs are serving in those two parts of the military. The work keeps on guaranteeing correspondence of chance for Sikhs in the US Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, a media discharge said on Saturday.

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There are an expected 500,000 Sikh-Americans in the US. There have been a few assaults on Sikhs in America. Two Sikh Americans were slaughtered in two separate episodes in a single week in California in July 2017. In March 2017, a 39-year-old Sikh man was shot in the arm outside his home in Kent, Washington, by a somewhat conceal shooter who yelled “return to your own nation”. In 2015, an older Sikh-American man was fiercely ambushed and left with serious facial wounds by an attacker who shouted racial slurs like “fear monger” and “Container Laden”, in a clear loathe wrongdoing not long before the US celebrated the commemoration of the 9/11 assaults. As per a 2009 Sikh Coalition report, 41 percent of Sikhs studied in New York City had been called harsh names, for example, “Osama bin Laden” or “terrorist”.

Also Read: Even 40ml of Liquor Daily Can Result in Death: Researchers

However, Anmol Narang becoming the first observant Sikh to graduate from US Military Academy at West Point makes the community hopeless of their status in the US. With her position in the US Military Narang is hopeful to bring about a change and educate people about Sikhism. She hopes to fight the stigma and myths that people have about Sikhs and show them the true spirit of service that Sikhs follow.


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