Thursday August 16, 2018

Anupam Kher Says His Ups And Downs Have Taught Him About Life

It has been an amazing journey so far

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anupam kher
Today after 34 years and 515 films, I can proudly say that my first film 'Saaransh' became my Saaransh.
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His first film was “Saaransh”. The actor, a National School of Drama alumnus, was only 28 when he took on the role of a retired middle class Maharashtrian man who had lost his son, in the drama directed by Mahesh Bhatt.

“I complete 34 years in movies. ‘Saaransh’, my first film was released on May 25, 1984. It has been an amazing journey so far,” Anupam tweeted.

“My ups and downs have taught me so much about people, life and entertainment business. Thank you Mahesh Bhatt saab,” he added.

Anupam won his first Filmfare Best Actor Award for his performance, and the film was also chosen as India’s official entry for the 1985 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film.

In a short clip shared on Twitter, the actor said: “I was 28 when I played role of a father. Everyone said that this might be the worst decision of my life. As an actor who was almost homeless and on the streets. I was scared. It was a defining moment of (my) life. Today after 34 years and 515 films, I can proudly say that my first film ‘Saaransh’ became my Saaransh.

“Thank you everyone for love and support. Please continue it for the next 34 years.”

anupam and kiran
A theatre enthusiast and multiple National Award-winning actor, Anupam’s career has been eventful – with films, plays, TV and as an acting teacher. Wikimedia

Bhatt took to Twitter to congratulate him.

“You still retain the same madness and passion I saw in your eyes the very first time I saw you. You make me proud,” he tweeted.

A theatre enthusiast and multiple National Award-winning actor, Anupam’s career has been eventful – with films, plays, TV and as an acting teacher.

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Having featured in films like “Karma”, “Lamhe”, “Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge”, “Maine Gandhi Ko Nahi Maara”, “Khosla Ka Ghosla”, “A Wednesday” and “Special 26”, the actor cemented his space as a versatile talent, who slipped into comic as well as serious roles with equal ease.

He has also featured in international movies and projects and has worked with directors such as Gurinder Chaddha, David O Russell, Ang Lee and Woody Allen. (IANS)

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‘A Fantastic Woman’ Could Have Been Paramount in Portraying a Transgender Woman’s Struggle

"A Fantastic Woman" fails to carry us along in its protagonist's tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can't wait to get out of it.

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Daniella Vega
'A fantastic Women' seems stretched out. Flickr

Film: “A Fantastic Woman” (Spanish, with English Subtitles, based on a transgender woman); Director: Sebastian Lelio; Starring: Daniela Vega; Rating: 1/2 (2 and a half stars)

“A Fantastic Woman” could have been penetrating portrait of a transgender woman’s struggle for dignity after her middle-aged lover suddenly dies on her.

Marina (played with consummate sensitivity by Daniela Vega) never quite recovers from the traumatic shock. Neither does the film. It quickly goes downhill from the point of tragedy, building what looks like a shell-shocked narrative in-sync with the stupor that falls over Daniela’s soul after Orlando (Francisco Reyes) passes away.

The ensuing trauma of a ‘woman’ who is unacceptable to society for her gender and status in the life of the man she loved, is brought out like a dentist extracting rotten teeth. It is a graceless situation.And director Sebastian Lelio goes with the frown, rendering every crease in Daniela’s disheveled existence in shades of black and fright.

Daniela Vega
Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, makes it seem unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose. Flickr

Daniela’s dilemma is so in-your-face, it hardly needed to be affirmed so strongly by the narrative. Her humiliation is shown in scenes in the hospital and at the police station. And we know what happens to the mistress specially when she is gender-challenged. But Marina’s behaviour post the tragedy eschews empathy. She frets, fumes, snarls and at one point even jumps on to the car of her deceased lover’s family to bounce up and down.

By this point the edgy narrative begins to look uneasily unfocused.

Perhaps Marina’s unconventional methods of protest are a cultural things. Maybe in Chile, the conventions of bereavement are played out at a pitch that seems fairly bizarre to us. Also, the fact that the film is in Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, such as the one where Marina is confronted by Orlando’s wife in a car basement, seems unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose.

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“A Fantastic Woman” fails to carry us along in its protagonist’s tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can’t wait to get out of it.

Neither can we. (IANS)