Friday February 22, 2019
Home Business Anxiety over ...

Anxiety over Greek referendum, short-lived volatility expected

0
//

By Rohit Vaid

Mumbai: Slight volatility is expected to hit the Indian equity markets in the coming week as investors will be jittery on account of the Greek referendum, upcoming first quarter results, the monsoon’s progression and key macro economic data.

However, market observers predicted to IANS that the volatility could be short-lived, as strong domestic fundamentals, economic reforms and a pick-up in government and private investments take place.

“Markets are expected to be slightly volatile in the beginning of the week due to the Greek referendum. For the short-term the Greek issue will be big enough for the market as a cue,” Devendra Nevgi, chief executive of ZyFin Advisors, told IANS.

“However, after the initial factoring-in of the situation, the domestic fundamentals such as policy initiatives and data points will be back into focus. These domestic factors are positive and will drive the markets to stability,” he added.

According to Dipen Shah, head of private client group research with Kotak Securities, the markets are hopeful that the outcome of the Greek referendum will not have any significant repercussions on the global economy – and especially India.

“The Indian economy is not linked to Greece in any major way. While there can be an impact on currency due to potential outflows, the strong forex reserves should help in reducing the impact to a great extent,” Shah said.

The Greek government has called for a referendum to let the people decide on the terms and conditions of another bailout.

Gaurav Jain, director of Hem Securities, elaborated to IANS that the positive bias in the Indian markets is expected to continue with Nifty having the potential to reach the 8,700-mark on the higher side.

“If things turn out to be negative, then the positive bias will help in mitigating the damage. Nifty in that scenario can be pulled down to the 8,000-mark on the lower side,” Jain said.

The markets will be looking ahead for key inflation and factory output data points like CPI (consumer price index), WPI (wholesale price index) and IIP (Index of Industrial Product) numbers.

“Traders will be eyeing the industrial production data for May scheduled to be announced on July 10. Needless to say, the progress of the monsoon will also remain in focus for the entire month,” Jayant Manglik, president for retail distribution with Religare Securities, told IANS.

The IIP data assumes significance as that for core sector industries released on June 30 showed the fastest pace of growth in the last six months ended May 2015 – at 4.4 percent year-on-year.

The eight core industries which comprise 38 percent of the total weight of items included in the Index of Industrial Production (IIP) stood at 178.6 as against 162.4 in April.

Analysts also point out that the countdown has begun for the earning season scheduled to start from July 21, which they believe holds the utmost importance in shaping the market’s direction.

“There is a hope that the first quarter (Q1) numbers due to be released soon will be better than the Q4 of 2014-15. Factors like lower inflation, easing of monetary policy and stable rupee are expected to be translated into better Q1 numbers,” Anand James, co-head, technical research desk, Geojit BNP Paribas, told IANS.

“There is also hope that the Q1 guidance is also going to be positive. However, in the worst case scenario, the markets seem to be ready for any negative surprises, especially in sector or stock-specific areas,” he added.

According to Anand, the market trajectory will also be influenced by the political climate leading up to parliament’s monsoon session later this month. The session is crucial because major bills such as on GST (goods and services tax) and land acquisition will be presented in parliament.

“The progress of monsoon will also be in the focus. We have noticed weakening of monsoon in the early part of this month. The continued weakness coupled with any adverse inflation numbers will give out negative signals for future lending rate cuts,” Anand added.

The barometer index of the Indian equities market, the 30-scrip Sensitive Index (Sensex) of the S&P Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE), gained 281 points or 1.01 percent during the weekly trade ended July 3.

The index closed at 28,092.79 points from the previous weekly closing of 27,811.84 points on June 26.

(IANS)

Next Story

Know How Venezuela Can Restore Back Its Economy

A U.S.-aligned government in Caracas would likely seek to restructure its debts to creditors like China and Russia, two countries that continue to support the Maduro government. China has loaned Venezuela $20 billion in exchange for future oil shipments.

0
Venezuela
A man holds a sign that reads in Spanish "They attack for oil" during a march of in support of the state-run oil company PDVSA, in Caracas, Venezuela, Jan. 31, 2019. VOA

Oil-rich Venezuela’s near economic collapse may make it easier for U.S.-backed opposition leaders to reverse socialist policies instituted by late President Hugo Chavez, if they are able to oust his successor, Nicolas Maduro, according to analysts.

“I do think at the very beginning, because the Venezuelan people have suffered so much there, they’re going to be willing to give a lot of political capital to the new leadership to do all of these changes,” said Dany Bahar, an Israeli and Venezuelan economist with the Brookings Institution in Washington.

People line up to receive bags with food subsidized by the Nicolas Maduro's government near the international bridge of Tienditas on the outskirts of Urena, Venezuela, Feb. 11, 2019.
People line up to receive bags with food subsidized by the Nicolas Maduro’s government near the international bridge of Tienditas on the outskirts of Urena, Venezuela, Feb. 11, 2019. VOA

Economic collapse

In the last five years, Venezuela’s economy has shrunk by nearly half. Nationalization of much of the private sector, including the oil industry, has driven away foreign investment. Hyperinflation, aggravated by the increasing fiscal deficit, is now close to 180 percent, with prices of goods tripling every month. More than 3 million people have fled the country to escape increasing poverty.

The government-subsidized assistance programs for the poor have been plagued by chronic food and medicine shortages, due in part to corruption and declining oil revenues that account for more than 95 percent of Venezuela’s export earnings.

Maduro has claimed the humanitarian crisis in his country is a “fabrication,” and blamed U.S. sanctions and capitalist sabotage for the economic shortfall.

The United States, as well as most of Latin America and Europe, has recognized Juan Guaido, president of Venezuela’s National Assembly, as the country’s interim leader, and support opposition claims that Maduro’s reelection last year was illegitimate after he banned most opposition parties from running.

FILE - Opposition National Assembly President Juan Guaido talks with reporters upon his arrival to the Venezuelan Central University for a conference on economic plans for reviving the country in Caracas, Venezuela, Jan. 31, 2019.
Opposition National Assembly President Juan Guaido talks with reporters upon his arrival to the Venezuelan Central University for a conference on economic plans for reviving the country in Caracas, Venezuela, Jan. 31, 2019. VOA

Market reforms

With the “Chavista” socialist model discredited, new Venezuelan leadership aligned with the United States would be expected to embrace strong market reforms that would entail an infusion of international aid and credit, privatizing state-controlled industries and cutting government subsidies.

“Market mechanisms have been completely destroyed. The government centralizes everything, decides who gets what, rations all sorts of goods, food, medication, everything. So, you have to get rid of that and just allow the market to reappear, which doesn’t really take very long if the situation on the ground is stable,” said Monica de Bolle, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington.

Fighting inflation will likely be the top priority for any new government. Recommended fiscal controls would include introducing a new currency tied to international exchange rates, as was done by Brazil and Argentina in the past. Venezuela’s bolivar has lost most of its value, as the Maduro government reacted to inflation by printing more money while its oil revenues plummeted and its deficit grew.

“The moment you move from very high inflation to low inflation, the first thing that you see is a dramatic reduction in poverty rates. This is what happened in Argentina. This is what happened in Brazil, you know, at the time when they were fighting their own inflationary problems,” said de Bolle.

Privatizing oil industry

The International Monetary Fund would likely require Venezuela to lift price controls and privatize state-owned companies, including the oil and gas company Petróleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), in exchange for billions of dollars in aid and loans. The reforms and influx of capital would help ease food and medicine shortages.

Venezuela has the world’s largest oil reserves, but production has fallen from three 3 million barrels per day (bpd) in 1997 to just over 1 million bpd in 2019. Maduro contributed to the decline by putting generals in charge of the company rather than industry professionals, and replacing qualified staff with thousands of political supporters.

“If we’re generous with the interpretation, they have also been doing social programs and things like that. If we’re not generous, it has become a vehicle of corruption for the regime. So, there’s going to need to be a deep restructuring of the oil company,” said Bahar.

A U.S.-aligned government in Caracas would likely seek to restructure its debts to creditors like China and Russia, two countries that continue to support the Maduro government. China has loaned Venezuela $20 billion in exchange for future oil shipments.

Also Read: Drugs Taken To Neutralize Stomach Acids Can Lead To Kidney Diseases

Ending Venezuela’s free oil shipments of an estimated 50,000 barrels per day to Cuba, another key Maduro ally, could redirect billions of dollars to support limited social programs at home.

If Maduro is removed from office, Washington is expected to ease oil sanctions imposed this year that are estimated to cut Venezuela’s oil exports by two-thirds. Oil sales to the U.S. had provided nearly 90 percent of Venezuela’s hard currency before the sanctions were enacted. (VOA)