Wednesday March 20, 2019
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Apple Accused of Making False Claims About its iPhone X Series

The plaintiffs also allege that the iPhone X series phones have lower screen resolution than advertised, the CNET report said on Saturday

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Apple accused of making false claims about iPhone X series. Pixabay

A lawsuit filed in a US court has accused Apple of making false claims about the screen sizes and pixel counts of the displays in its iPhone X series, CNET reported.

The suit filed on Friday in the District Court of Northern California alleges that the Cupertino, California-headquartered tech giant lied about the screen sizes of iPhone X, iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max devices by counting non-screen areas like the notch and corners.

The two plaintiffs who filed the suit are seeking class action status, according to the report.

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An Apple store in Woodbridge, Virginia. (VOA)

The suit alleges that Apple is falsely marketing the new line of iPhones as “all screen”.

For example, the screen size of iPhone X is “only about 5.6875 inches”, and not 5.8 inches as claimed by Apple, the complaint stated.

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The plaintiffs also allege that the iPhone X series phones have lower screen resolution than advertised, the CNET report said on Saturday.

Apple was sued over its products earlier also. A lawsuit filed in June alleged that the screen of Apple Watch has a tendency to “crack, shatter or detach from the body of the watch.” (IANS)

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Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care," said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine. 

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The study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. Pixabay

Apple Watch can detect and notify users when they experience irregular heart rhythms, finds a study demonstrating the ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation.

In 2017, Apple had partnered with researchers from the Stanford University and launched an app called “Apple Heart Study” to determine whether a mobile app that uses data from a heart rate pulse sensor on the Apple Watch can identify atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, a deadly and often undiagnosed condition, can lead to strokes. The condition often remains hidden because many people do not experience symptoms.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value. Pixabay

The findings showed only 0.5 per cent participants received irregular pulse notifications, an important finding given the concerns about potential over-notification.

Eighty-four per cent of the time participants who received irregular pulse notifications were found to be in atrial fibrillation at the time of the notification and 34 per cent who followed up by using an ECG patch over a week later were found to have atrial fibrillation.

“The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care,” said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine.

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“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. Pixabay

“Atrial fibrillation is just the beginning, as this study opens the door to further research into wearable technologies and how they might be used to prevent disease before it strikes — a key goal of precision health,” Minor said.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value.

“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. (IANS)