Monday March 18, 2019
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Apple Apologises For Flaw in FaceTime Software

Apple said it disabled the Group FaceTime feature as soon as its engineering team became aware of the details necessary to reproduce the bug

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Apple could acquire the entertainment company, Netflix
Apple could acquire the entertainment company, Netflix. IANS

Apple has apologised for a flaw in FaceTime software that allowed people to eavesdrop on others, even if they never answered a FaceTime call, the media reported.

The Cupertino, California-headquartered tech giant said a fix for the bug which will re-enable the group FaceTime feature will be available to users next week, CNBC reported on Friday.

Apple had originally said that a fix was coming this week.

With iOS 12.1 and later versions, Group FaceTime is designed to make it easy to chat with multiple people at the same time. One can start a Group FaceTime right from the FaceTime app or from a group conversation in the Messages app.

But the bug allowed people to listen in on, or even see someone, during a group FaceTime call, even if the person receiving the call did not pick up, the CNBC report said.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

Apple has credited the family of a 14-year-old for reporting the bug.

“We have fixed the Group FaceTime security bug on Apple’s servers and we will issue a software update to re-enable the feature for users next week,” Apple was quoted as saying in a statement.

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“We thank the Thompson family for reporting the bug. We sincerely apologise to our customers who were affected and all who were concerned about this security issue. We appreciate everyone’s patience as we complete this process,” the statement added.

Apple said it disabled the Group FaceTime feature as soon as its engineering team became aware of the details necessary to reproduce the bug. (IANS)

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Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care," said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine. 

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The study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. Pixabay

Apple Watch can detect and notify users when they experience irregular heart rhythms, finds a study demonstrating the ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation.

In 2017, Apple had partnered with researchers from the Stanford University and launched an app called “Apple Heart Study” to determine whether a mobile app that uses data from a heart rate pulse sensor on the Apple Watch can identify atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, a deadly and often undiagnosed condition, can lead to strokes. The condition often remains hidden because many people do not experience symptoms.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value. Pixabay

The findings showed only 0.5 per cent participants received irregular pulse notifications, an important finding given the concerns about potential over-notification.

Eighty-four per cent of the time participants who received irregular pulse notifications were found to be in atrial fibrillation at the time of the notification and 34 per cent who followed up by using an ECG patch over a week later were found to have atrial fibrillation.

“The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care,” said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine.

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“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. Pixabay

“Atrial fibrillation is just the beginning, as this study opens the door to further research into wearable technologies and how they might be used to prevent disease before it strikes — a key goal of precision health,” Minor said.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value.

“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. (IANS)