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Apple Faces Lawsuit For Forcing Users to Repeatedly Buy New Chargers

Meanwhile, the Cupertino-based giant's own support advises if users see the "accessory may not be supported" warning, it could be due to a number of different reasons, including if the accessory is defective or damaged

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Customers walk past an Apple logo inside of an Apple store at Grand Central Station in New York, Aug. 1, 2018. VOA

A California law firm has filed a new class action lawsuit against Apple for forcing owners of iOS devices to repeatedly buy new chargers by updating the iPhones with new requirements around 2016, the media reported.

The suit claims that thousands of iPhone owners in the US and other countries started to experience issues with their older iPhones around November 2016, and there were claims that iPhones stopped recognising and accepting their chargers.

The lawsuit was filed after a user found that her old charger suddenly stopped functioning properly with her iPhone.

“Filed in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, the lawsuit identifies Monica Emerson as the main plaintiff, with the suit filed ‘on behalf of all other members of the public similarly situated’,” the Apple Insider reported late on Tuesday.

The filing further notes that the chargers were also produced by the iPhone-maker, and not a third-party company.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

“In the plaintiff’s specific case, they noted an update in October 2017 for iOS, and that later on the iPhone displayed the message ‘this accessory may not be supported’ when attempting to charge.

“It is alleged Apple ‘forced updates to the iPhones which were specifically designed and programmed to reject’ old iPhone chargers,” the report added.

Also Read- Photo-messaging App Snapchat Stops Losing its Users

According to the lawsuit, this phrase meant “requiring that users buy a new charger”.

Meanwhile, the Cupertino-based giant’s own support advises if users see the “accessory may not be supported” warning, it could be due to a number of different reasons, including if the accessory is defective or damaged. (IANS)

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Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care," said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine. 

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The study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. Pixabay

Apple Watch can detect and notify users when they experience irregular heart rhythms, finds a study demonstrating the ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation.

In 2017, Apple had partnered with researchers from the Stanford University and launched an app called “Apple Heart Study” to determine whether a mobile app that uses data from a heart rate pulse sensor on the Apple Watch can identify atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, a deadly and often undiagnosed condition, can lead to strokes. The condition often remains hidden because many people do not experience symptoms.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value. Pixabay

The findings showed only 0.5 per cent participants received irregular pulse notifications, an important finding given the concerns about potential over-notification.

Eighty-four per cent of the time participants who received irregular pulse notifications were found to be in atrial fibrillation at the time of the notification and 34 per cent who followed up by using an ECG patch over a week later were found to have atrial fibrillation.

“The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care,” said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine.

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“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. Pixabay

“Atrial fibrillation is just the beginning, as this study opens the door to further research into wearable technologies and how they might be used to prevent disease before it strikes — a key goal of precision health,” Minor said.

Also Read: Study Reveals Solar Cells Can Retain Most Of Their Power Conversion Efficiency in Near Space

Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value.

“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. (IANS)