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Apple Gets a New AI Chief to Oversee Siri, Machine Learning

Apple has posted several job openings for AI/ML engineers at its different offices globally

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Top apps using Siri Shortcuts to make daily tasks easier: Apple. Pixabay

Revealing its future plans, Apple has formally announced to make ex-Google executive John Giannandrea its Chief of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Strategy.

Reporting to CEO Tim Cook, Giannandrea who joined Apple in April will be in charge of Apple’s ML division, Siri and the Core ML team, the company updating its executive leadership page, said.

Giannandrea will look after further development of Core ML and Siri technologies. With Core ML, third-party developers can integrate trained ML models into their apps.

Prior to Apple, Giannandrea spent eight years at Google where he led the Machine Intelligence, Research and Search teams. Before it, he co-founded two technology companies — Tellme Networks and Metaweb Technologies.

Apple chief
John Giannandrea, the Chief of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) Strategy.

At Google, Giannandrea took the role of Senior Vice President of Engineering from Amit Singhal in early 2016, signalling Google’s emphasis on weaving ML and AI into its Search engine.

According to media reports, Apple lags behind from Google and Amazon in key AI areas like Natural Language Processing (NLP) and computer vision needed to power voice assistant features in Siri.

Also Read: Apple Music On Lead Over Its Rival Spotify In All Market: Report

Apple has invested in Siri and HomeKit to compete with Google Home and Alexa-based smart home systems.

In 2017, Apple added an AI chip called Neural Engine to the A11 Bionic for the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X to work with the Image Signal Processor (ISP).

Apple has posted several job openings for AI/ML engineers at its different offices globally. (IANS)

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Tech Giant Apple Pledges to Alert Users on iPhone Performance

Apple has agreed to do this both for current and future iPhones

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Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

Apple has committed to be clearer and more upfront with iPhone users about battery health and performance, the UK’s competition watchdog has said.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) had raised consumer law concerns with the Cupertino-based tech giant last year after finding people were not being warned clearly that their phone’s performance could slow down following a 2017 software update designed to manage demands on the battery.

“The CMA became concerned that people might have tried to repair their phone or replace it because they weren’t aware the software update had caused the handset to slow down,” the watchdog said in a statement on late Wednesday.

In addition, people were not able to easily find information about the health of their phone’s battery, which can degrade over time.

After the CMA raised its concerns, Apple started to be more up front with iPhone users.

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This Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, photo shows from left the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and the iPhone XR in New York. The new XR phone has a larger display and loses the home button to make room for more screen. VOA

“But today’s announcement locks the firm into formal commitments always to notify people when issuing a planned software update if it is expected to materially change the impact of performance management on their phones,” the watchdog added.

Apple will also provide easily accessible information about battery health and unexpected shutdowns, along with guidance on how iPhone users can maximise the health of their phone’s battery.

Also Read- Mobile Networks Suspending Orders for Huawei Smartphones: Report

This could help people improve the performance of their own handset after a planned software update by, for example, changing settings, adopting the low power mode or replacing the battery – rather than resorting to having their phone repaired or replaced.

Apple has agreed to do this both for current and future iPhones. (IANS)