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Apple Hires Former Facebook Employee in its Privacy Team

Parakilas had earlier worked as Chief Strategy Officer for the non-profit Centre for Humane Technology

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Customers walk past an Apple logo inside of an Apple store at Grand Central Station in New York, Aug. 1, 2018. VOA

Apple has reportedly hired a former Facebook employee — who testified before the British Parliament on the social media giant’s data-sharing policies during the Cambridge Analytica scandal — as product manager on its privacy team.

According to a report in the Financial Times on Wednesday, the iPhone maker has hired Sandy Parakilas who worked as product manager for Facebook for 18 months before leaving the company in 2012.

Parakilas’ job will involve working to ensure that future products minimise data collection and protect privacy.

Apple, Iphone XR, Apple Watch
Apple hires Facebook critic on its privacy team: Report. Flickr Commons

During his stint in Facebook, he warned senior executives that the company’s data-sharing policies could have potentially damaging consequences.

“However, Parakilas felt his concerns were being downplayed and eventually left the company,” said the report.

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When the Cambridge Analytica scandal broke last March , Parakilas told the Guardian that it had been “painful watching” the company struggle with the fallout because he knew “they could have prevented it”.

Parakilas had earlier worked as Chief Strategy Officer for the non-profit Centre for Humane Technology. (IANS)

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4,000 Viewed NZ Mosques Shootings Live, Claims Facebook

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram

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facebook, social media
Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. Facebook said it is aware of outages on its platforms including Facebook, Messenger and Instagram. VOA

Facing the flak over its inability to spot and remove the livestreaming of New Zealand mosque’s shooting, Facebook on Tuesday said 4,000 people viewed it before being taken down.

“The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast,” Chris Sonderby, VP and Deputy General Counsel, said in a blog-post. “Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4,000 times in total before being removed from Facebook,” Sonderby added.

Strapped with a GoPro camera to his head, the gunman broadcasted graphic footage of shooting via Facebook Live for nearly 17 minutes. It was later shared in millions on other social media platforms.

Fifty people were killed in the shootings at Al Noor Mosque and the Linwood Avenue Masjid in Christchurch on March 15 after 28-year-old Australian national Brenton Tarrant opened indiscriminate firings.

According to Facebook, the first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended. “Before we were alerted to the video, a user on ‘8chan’ posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site,” said Sonderby.

Facebook, photos
This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

“We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface,” he said.

Facebook said it removed the original video and hashed it to detect other shares visually similar to that video and automatically remove them from Facebook and Instagram.

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“Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems, including the use of audio technology,” Sonderby said.

“In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services,” he said. (IANS)