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Apple Introduces Deep Fusion Photography in the Latest Developer Beta of iOS

As per the report, iPadOS 13.1.2 also fixes the iCloud backup issue and addresses the shortcuts issue on the HomePod

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apple, software, updates, iOS
An Apple company logo is seen behind tree branches outside an Apple store in Beijing, Dec. 14, 2018. VOA

Apple has rolled out its Deep Fusion photography system in the latest developer beta of iOS 13.2, compatible with the latest iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max.

Deep Fusion is a new image processing pipeline for medium-light images. It is meant to offer a massive step forward in indoor and medium-lighting situations, the Verge reported on Tuesday.

As per the report, it uses machine learning to create more detailed, sharper and more natural-looking photos.

Deep Fusion was not ready when these three new iPhones were launched, a couple of weeks ago. At the launch event, company’s senior VP Phil Schiller described Deep Fusion as ‘computational photography mad science’.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

Additionally, Apple has rolled iOS 13.1.2 and iPadOS 13.1.2 update to fix bugs and upgrade performance.

The iOS 13.1.2 update deals with flashlight, a bug that could cause loss of display calibration data, iCloud Backup issue and Bluetooth disconnect problem, Apple Insider reported on Monday.

Also Read: Key Financial Partners Wary of Facebook’s Digital Currency: Report

As per the report, iPadOS 13.1.2 also fixes the iCloud backup issue and addresses the shortcuts issue on the HomePod. (IANS)

Next Story

Apple Refutes Report of Sharing Safari Data with Tencent or Google

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is "ingrained in the Constitution," but that he's worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us

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Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

After media reports surfaced that Apple is sending iOS users’ data via its Safari browser to Google and the Chinese tech company Tencent, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker refuted such reports, saying it safeguards people’s information in its own systems and never shares it with third-party players.

A report in reclaimthenet.org stated that “Apple, which often positions itself as a champion of privacy and human rights, may be sending some IP addresses from users of its Safari browser on iOS to Chinese conglomerate Tencent — a company with close ties to the Chinese Communist Party”.

The report focused on Apple’s “fraudulent website warning” system which is built into Apple’s Safari web browser to warn people when they visit sites that are harmful and can trick users into sharing login passwords for banks, email and social media.

“Before visiting a website, Safari may send information calculated from the website address to Google Safe Browsing and Tencent Safe Browsing to check if the website is fraudulent. These browsing providers may also log your IP address,’ read the information on Apple’s “Safari & Privacy” section.

It’s unclear when Apple started allowing Tencent and Google to log some user IP addresses, but one Twitter user reported the change in Safari happened as early as the iOS 12.2 beta in February 2019, said the report.

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

In a statement, the company said it actually doesn’t send information to Google or Tencent.

“Instead, it receives a list of bad websites from both companies and then uses it to protect people as they surf the web. Apple sometimes obscures the information about the website people visit if it requests more information to check if a questionable website is malicious,” CNET reported on Monday, citing Apple’s statement.

Also Read: Kerala Unable to get Medics from Reserved Category

For people concerned about their privacy, the service can be turned off in Safari preferences on the iPhone or Mac.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is “ingrained in the Constitution,” but that he’s worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us. (IANS)