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Apple Patent Reveals a Custom Inflatable Blood Pressure Cuff

Apple patents BP monitoring 'cuff'

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Apple has patented a design for a wearable blood pressure monitor — a cuff, equipped with a sensor that is expected to be Bluetooth compatible and sport a touchscreen.

“These devices work through a collection of tiny airbags, or ‘cells’ in the patent, to exert pressure on the wearer’s arm and cut off blood flow. From there, the device gets a measure of the heart’s maximum output before releasing to get a measure of the heart’s resting output,” The Verge reported late on Thursday.

The iPhone maker’s proposed product would reportedly eliminate the need for cardiac-concerned users to go through other third parties.

Apple
Apple . Pixabay

However, the company’s first full-on medical device would have to get approvals from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before hitting the markets.

According to the US Trademark and Patent Office, the description of the patented wearable said: “A low-profile blood pressure measurement system and methods of use are disclosed. The system includes an expandable member or structure that has a multi-compartment structure and/or is mounted on a rigid surface or structure.”

Also Read: Apple Introduces macOS Mojave

An “actuator” to measure how much pressure is needed to get a good reading without crushing the user’s arm entirely is also part of the patented design for Apple’s blood pressure monitor.

“It seems to be a device whose function could very well be rolled into future Apple Watch devices down the line,” The Verge report added. (IANS)

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Study: Dementia Risk to 50-year-olds With Raised Blood Pressure

How middle-age hypertension raises dementia risk later

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Dementia Risk to 50-year-olds With Raised Blood Pressure
Dementia Risk to 50-year-olds raises with Blood Pressure . Pixabay

A high blood pressure level but still below the usual threshold for treating hypertension can put 50-year-olds at increased risk of developing dementia later, revealed a study led by an Indian-origin researcher.

According to the American Heart Association, normal blood pressure is below 120/80 mmHg.

People with a systolic blood pressure (the top number) of 130 mmHg or more at the age of 50 had a 45 per cent greater risk of developing dementia than those with a lower level at the same age.

The risk was 47 per cent even in people with no heart or blood vessel-related conditions.

“Our work confirms the detrimental effects of midlife hypertension for risk of dementia,” said lead author Archana Singh-Manoux, Professor at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) in Paris.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

The reason for the increased risk of dementia includes the fact that high blood pressure is linked to silent or mini strokes (where symptoms often are not noticeable), damage to the white matter in the brain, which contains many of the brain’s nerve fibres, and restricted blood supply to the brain.

This damage may underlie the resulting decline in the brain’s processes, the researchers explained in the study of nearly 9,000 people, published in the European Heart Journal.

However, the association was not seen at the ages of 60 and 70, and diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) was not linked to dementia.

Also Read: Rutgers Researchers Develop Automated Robotic Device For Faster Blood Testing

“Our analysis suggests that the importance of mid-life hypertension on brain health is due to the duration of exposure,” the researcher said.

“So we see an increased risk for people with raised blood pressure at age 50, but not 60 or 70, because those with hypertension at age 50 are likely to be ‘exposed’ to this risk for longer,” she added.

Another study reported in the journal Cardiovascular Research showed that higher risk of developing dementia in hypertensive patients occurs due to significant alterations in three specific white matter fibre-tracts linked to executive functions, processing speed, memory and related learning tasks — brain areas associated with dementia. (IANS)