Tuesday February 19, 2019
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Apple Probing Growing Cases of iTunes Credit Card Fraud in Singapore: Report

Apple Singapore told Channel NewsAsia that they are looking into the matter, while highlighting that their support page provides an avenue for customers to report any problems with purchases made on iTunes

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Apple lowers Q1 revenue guidance on slow iPhone sales.

Apple Singapore is looking into the growing cases of fraudulent credit card transactions made via iTunes, the media reported.

iTunes is Apple’s entertainment app and users can buy music and movies via the iTunes Store.

But in Singapore, tens of Apple customers have been billed for charges they did not make on their iTunes accounts, ChannelNews Asia reported on Sunday.

The customers were banking with several banks in the region, including the DBS and Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation (OCBC).

At OCBC alone, there were 58 cases of fraudulent transactions in July, the report said.

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In Singapore, tens of Apple customers have been billed for charges they did not make on their iTunes accounts. Pixabay

“In early July, we detected and investigated unusual transactions on 58 cardholders’ accounts. Upon confirmation that these were fraudulent transactions, we deployed the necessary counter-measures and are currently assisting the affected cardholders via the chargeback process,” Vincent Tan, Head of Credit Cards at OCBC Bank was quoted as saying.

Channel NewsAsia talked to two victims who lost at least $5,000 each to iTunes purchases. One of them, who was billed on her HSBC credit card, said she only realised something was amiss when she got an alert from HSBC that she had less than 30 per cent of her credit limit left.

Also Read: Apple Launches a $300 Million Fund to Bring Clean Energy to China

She realised the extent of the issue after speaking to a customer service operator.

Apple Singapore told Channel NewsAsia that they are looking into the matter, while highlighting that their support page provides an avenue for customers to report any problems with purchases made on iTunes. (IANS)

Next Story

Huawei Involved in Stealing Apple Trade Secrets

Huawei also reportedly copied a component of the MacBook Pro. The company built a connector for its MateBook Pro that was just like the one used in Apple’s MacBook Pro from 2016

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Huawei, China, Canada
A man lights a cigarette outside a Huawei retail shop in Beijing. VOA

Chinese tech giant Huawei has been involved in “a pattern of dubious tactics” to steal technology from its rivals, particularly Apple’s China-based suppliers, The Information has claimed.

While the theft of trade secrets is nothing new among technology firms, the new allegations against Huawei represent “a more brazen and elaborate system of seeking out secret information”, said the report on Monday.

According to the report, a Huawei engineer in charge of the smartwatch project tracked down a supplier that makes the heart rate sensor for Apple Watch that has approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The engineer arranged a meeting and questioned the supplier about the Apple Watch.

“The Huawei engineer attended the supplier meeting with four Huawei researchers in tow. The Huawei team spent the time pressing the supplier for details about the Apple Watch.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

“They were trying their luck, but we wouldn’t tell them anything,” the supplier was quoted as saying.

According to the US Justice Department, Huawei is said to have a formal programme that rewards employees for stealing information, including bonuses that increase based on the confidential value of the information gathered.

The Department has filed a host of criminal charges, including bank fraud, obstruction of justice and theft of technology against Huawei and its detained Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou. Both Huawei and Meng have denied the allegations.

Also Read- Cyber Crimes Pose a Challenge to Traditional Policing, Says Home Minister Rajnath Singh

A Huawei spokesperson replied to the report, saying that “In conducting research and development, Huawei employees must search and use publicly available information and respect third-party intellectual property per our business-conduct guidelines”.

Huawei also reportedly copied a component of the MacBook Pro. The company built a connector for its MateBook Pro that was just like the one used in Apple’s MacBook Pro from 2016. (IANS)