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Apple Spent $60 bn Supporting More Than 450,000 Jobs in US

In a letter to investors, Cook had acknowledged that the revenue shortfall in its guidance was partly due to China's trade tensions with the US. The slowdown in the Chinese economy also impacted its revenue, he said.

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The Apple logo is shown outside the company's Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, California. VOA

Apple spent $60 billion last year with 9,000 American component suppliers and companies, an increase of more than 10 per cent from the year before — supporting more than 450,000 jobs.

“Since 2011, the total number of jobs created and supported by Apple in the US has more than tripled — from almost 600,000 to 2 million across all 50 states,” the company said in a statement as it readied to announce the results of its first quarter of fiscal 2019 on Tuesday.

Just over a year ago, component manufacturer Finisar was awarded $390 million from Apple’s Advanced Manufacturing Fund.

To expand production of a critical part of the “TrueDepth” camera system, introduced with iPhone X, Finisar turned an unoccupied building in Sherman, Texas into a bustling operation full of people who will supply that future business, said Apple.

Since 2011, the total number of jobs created and supported by Apple in the US has more than tripled — from almost 600,000 to 2 million across all 50 states, the company informed.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

Apple on January 2 revised down its expected revenues from $89 billion to $84 billion for the first quarter of fiscal 2019.

Apple shares fell after it lowered its revenue estimate and President Donald Trump said he was not bothered about the tech giant’s concerns.

Trump said that China was the biggest beneficiary of Apple, more than the US “because they build their product mostly in China”.

Also Read- Beware Of Your Personal Data Stored Online

“I told (Apple CEO) Tim Cook, who’s a friend of mine, who I like a lot, make your product in the US,” the President had said.

In a letter to investors, Cook had acknowledged that the revenue shortfall in its guidance was partly due to China’s trade tensions with the US. The slowdown in the Chinese economy also impacted its revenue, he said. (IANS)

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Small Shops in US Often Sell Tobacco Without Checking Age

More than 64 per cent of grocery stores checked IDs, compared with about 34 per cent of convenience stores and tobacco shops, and 29 per cent bars, restaurants and alcohol stores

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FILE - An anti-tobacco warning is seen on a road divider on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, Nov. 4, 2016. VOA

Those buying tobacco from shops in the US, especially small stores, are usually not asked for identification hence it is easy for underage users to buy cigarettes there, says a study.

When researchers, aged 20 and 21, visited a variety of shops in the US, more than 60 per cent of cashiers did not ask them for identification.

In the study published in the American Journal of Health Promotion, it was found that these young adults slipped by without an age check most often when they visited small stores, tobacco shops and shops plastered with tobacco ads.

“Our findings suggest that certain types of stores – tobacco shops, convenience stores and those with a lot of tobacco advertising – are more likely to sell tobacco to a young person without checking his or her ID,” said Megan Roberts, Assistant Professor at Ohio State University in the US.

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FILE – Cigarette packs are seen on shelves in a tobacco shop in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France. VOA

“One implication of this finding is that enforcement may benefit from targeted outreach and monitoring at these locations,” she added.

The study included visits to a randomly sampled 103 tobacco retailers in 2017.

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More than 64 per cent of grocery stores checked IDs, compared with about 34 per cent of convenience stores and tobacco shops, and 29 per cent bars, restaurants and alcohol stores.

“Having a minimum legal sales age for tobacco is important for reducing youth access to tobacco. Not only does it prevent young people from purchasing tobacco for themselves, but it prevents them from buying tobacco and distributing it to others, often younger peers,” Roberts said. (IANS)