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Apple Store at Carnegie Library to Focus on Creativity

Reconstituting the Carnegie Library according to its original design standards was Apple’s “most historic, ambitious restoration by far in the world”, Cook claimed in the interview

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The Apple logo is shown outside the company's Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco, California. VOA

Suggesting that the soon-to-open Apple Store at Washington DC’s Carnegie Library will do much more than just selling iPhones and other products, Apple CEO Tim Cook has said that the outlet will focus on community and creativity, the media reported.

Due to open on May 11, Apple has spent an estimated $30 million in renovating the 116-year-old Carnegie Library into an Apple Store, The Washington Post reported on Friday.

The Carnegie Library store will utilise Apple’s “town square” concept, making it one of the company’s 13 high-profile locations across the world where each local staff offers a bevy of classes to help users to maximise their Apple products for photography, video editing or producing music.

“Probably one of the least done things in an Apple Store is to buy something,” Cook told the Post in an interview.

Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

People come to explore new products, but also get training and services for iPhones or iPads they already own, he said.

“We should probably come up with a name other than ‘store,’” he said, “because it’s more of a place for the community to use in a much broader way.”

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Reconstituting the Carnegie Library according to its original design standards was Apple’s “most historic, ambitious restoration by far in the world”, Cook claimed in the interview. (IANS)

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Apple Refutes Report of Sharing Safari Data with Tencent or Google

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is "ingrained in the Constitution," but that he's worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us

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Apple, Campus, China
A customer is entering the Apple store in Fairfax, Virginia. VOA

After media reports surfaced that Apple is sending iOS users’ data via its Safari browser to Google and the Chinese tech company Tencent, the Cupertino-based iPhone maker refuted such reports, saying it safeguards people’s information in its own systems and never shares it with third-party players.

A report in reclaimthenet.org stated that “Apple, which often positions itself as a champion of privacy and human rights, may be sending some IP addresses from users of its Safari browser on iOS to Chinese conglomerate Tencent — a company with close ties to the Chinese Communist Party”.

The report focused on Apple’s “fraudulent website warning” system which is built into Apple’s Safari web browser to warn people when they visit sites that are harmful and can trick users into sharing login passwords for banks, email and social media.

“Before visiting a website, Safari may send information calculated from the website address to Google Safe Browsing and Tencent Safe Browsing to check if the website is fraudulent. These browsing providers may also log your IP address,’ read the information on Apple’s “Safari & Privacy” section.

It’s unclear when Apple started allowing Tencent and Google to log some user IP addresses, but one Twitter user reported the change in Safari happened as early as the iOS 12.2 beta in February 2019, said the report.

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

In a statement, the company said it actually doesn’t send information to Google or Tencent.

“Instead, it receives a list of bad websites from both companies and then uses it to protect people as they surf the web. Apple sometimes obscures the information about the website people visit if it requests more information to check if a questionable website is malicious,” CNET reported on Monday, citing Apple’s statement.

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For people concerned about their privacy, the service can be turned off in Safari preferences on the iPhone or Mac.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has said he believes privacy is “ingrained in the Constitution,” but that he’s worried about how third-party companies have worked to collect information on us. (IANS)