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Apple’s Recycling Robot Is Capable of Disassembling 200 iPhones Per Hour

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills. 

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Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year. Pixabay

 Apple on Thursday announced to expand its global recycling programmes and introduced Daisy, its recycling robot that is capable of disassembling 200 iPhones per hour.

US customers can send their iPhones to be disassembled by Daisy which is 33 feet long, has five arms and can methodically deconstruct any of 15 iPhone models.

Daisy will disassemble and recycle select used iPhones returned to Best Buy stores throughout the US and KPN retailers in the Netherlands, the company said in a statement ahead of Earth Day that falls on April 22.

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For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain. Pixabay

Apple also announced the opening of its “Material Recovery Lab” dedicated to discovering future recycling processes in Austin, Texas.

The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges.

“Advanced recycling must become an important part of the electronics supply chain, and Apple is pioneering a new path to help push our industry forward,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives.

Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year.

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills.

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The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges. Pixabay

Daisy can take apart iPhones to recover materials such as cobalt, aluminum and tin, which are then recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Once materials have been recovered by Daisy, they are recycled back into the manufacturing process.

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For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain.

They are then combined with scrap from select manufacturing sites and, for the first time, cobalt recovered through this process is now being used to make brand-new Apple batteries. (IANS)

Next Story

Trade-war Between US and China Could Make iPhones 3% More Costly

Ives’ estimates are just the latest by analysts about the impact of the U.S.-China trade war, the report added

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The Apple iPhone 7 is displayed at an Apple store at the Grove in Los Angeles, California. VOA

The ongoing trade-war between the US and China has caused Apple’s iPhone production costs to rise as much as 3 per cent because of the new retaliatory tariffs imposed by Beijing.

“Tariffs on the device’s Chinese-made batteries and other components would increase its manufacturing cost by 2 per cent to 3 per cent,” Fortune quoted a Wedbush analyst Dan Ives as telling investors.

To recoup the same profit on each iPhone sold as before, Apple would need to increase iPhone prices by a similar amount.

“The price of an iPhone XS, for example, would rise from $999 to as much as $1,029,” the report said.

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This Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, photo shows from left the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and the iPhone XR in New York. The new XR phone has a larger display and loses the home button to make room for more screen. VOA

According to Ives, Apple’s costs could soar higher if the Trump administration follows through with a plan to add an additional $325 billion in tariffs to Chinese goods. If that happens, iPhones would cost an extra $120 each to produce.

Ives’ estimates are just the latest by analysts about the impact of the U.S.-China trade war, the report added.

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On May 10, that fight entered a new phase when President Donald Trump’s administration announced $200 billion in new tariffs on Chinese imports.

In response, China on Monday retaliated by announcing $60 billion in tariffs on US-produced batteries, coffee, and other products. Those tariffs would take effect on June 1. (IANS)