Saturday December 7, 2019
Home Lead Story Arrest Of ISI...

Arrest Of ISIS-Inspired Texas Teen A Reminder For Temples To Review Security Plans 

The Department of Homeland Security’s Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship offers invaluable information for temples to start implementing a plan, if they do not already have one in place.

0
//
The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a non-partisan advocacy organization for the Hindu American community.
Flag of Islamic State, Wikimedia commons

Yesterday a Plano, Texas teenager was arrested after he revealed his plot to carry out a mass shooting, in what is being reported as an ISIS-inspired attack. Among the targets reportedly considered by the suspect, were a school, local Hindu temple, and shopping mall. The latter was ultimately the chosen target.

Dr. Rajiv Pandit, HAF Board Member and local Dallas community leader, offered the following statement:

“The Hindu American Foundation thanks both local and Federal law enforcement officials for their diligence and work on this case. We’re grateful the suspect was caught in time, saving innumerable lives. While it has not been made public which Hindu temple was a potential target — there are over twenty in the area — the Foundation urges all houses of worship to use this incident as a reminder and opportunity to review their existing emergency operations plan.”

The Hindu American Foundation thanks both local and Federal law enforcement officials for their diligence and work on this case.
London Bridge Attack by IS, wikimedia commons

The Department of Homeland Security’s Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship offers invaluable information for temples to start implementing a plan, if they do not already have one in place.

ABOUT HAF

The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a non-partisan advocacy organization for the Hindu American community. The Foundation educates the public about Hinduism, speaks out about issues affecting Hindus worldwide, and builds bridges with institutions and individuals whose work aligns with HAF’s objectives. HAF focuses on human and civil rights, public policy, media, academia, and interfaith relations. Through its advocacy efforts, HAF seeks to cultivate leaders and empower future generations of Hindu Americans.

Also Read: Analysts Hopeless Over the Trade Talks Between the U.S. and Chinese Government

The Hindu American Foundation is not affiliated with any religious or political organizations or entities. HAF seeks to serve Hindu Americans across all sampradayas (Hindu religious traditions) regardless of race, color, national origin, citizenship, caste, gender, sexual orientation, age and/or disability.

Next Story

Research Says, Hindu Kids are More Likely to Believe that Hinduism Equals to Being Indian

The findings, published in the journal Child Development, also suggest that Muslim children feel no less Indian because of their faith

0
Hindu
If Muslim children were to equate being Indian with being Hindu, they could very well feel conflicted about being Indian or being Muslim. Pixabay

When it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country’s Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

“Our results indicate that by age 9, Hindu children have already internalised an ‘Indian equals Hindu’ association, and we show that this association predicts children’s support for policies that favor Hindus over Muslims,” said study senior author Mahesh Srinivasan, Associate Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley.

The findings, published in the journal Child Development, also suggest that Muslim children feel no less Indian because of their faith, indicating they are shielded from religious nationalist messaging and able to identify both as Indian and as Muslim, added Srinivasan.

“If Muslim children were to equate being Indian with being Hindu, they could very well feel conflicted about being Indian or being Muslim. We know from other research that disconnection from one’s own national, ethnic, or religious group is bad for mental health and other life outcomes,” he said.

Through surveys and social psychology measures, the researchers examined the explicit and implicit associations and attitudes of 160 schoolchildren aged between 9 and 16 in Vadodara, Gujarat.

All the children attended Zenith, a charitable school for low-income children in Vadodara.

The children, 79 of whom were Hindu and 81 of whom were Muslim, were each given an implicit association test, which asked them to swiftly pair together words and pictures.

Hindu
When it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country’s Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. Pixabay

The results showed that Hindu children more readily paired images associated with India with the word “Hindu” and images associated with foreign countries with “Muslim,” suggesting that they think of India as primarily a Hindu nation.

By contrast, Muslim children were just as fast at pairing Indian images with the words “Hindu” or “Muslim.”

ALSO READ: India Plans to Open 100 New Airports by 2024

India is home to about 900 million Hindus and 200 million Muslims, as well as Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jews and offshoots of these groups. (IANS)