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Tibetan self-immolation videos feature in art exhibition

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New Delhi: A video named ‘Funeral #1’, featuring in an art exhibition featuring mixed media installations, follows Ani Palden Choetso, a Buddhist nun and her self-immolation on a street corner in Tawu town in eastern Tibet.

The eight-minute footage, smuggled out of Tibet, shows Choetso standing rock still, engulfed in flames, before collapsing. Later, a crowd gathers and prevents security officials from taking her body away. It shows her funeral at the local monastery, where thousands hold a gloomy candlelight vigil. Two days later, a hurriedly filmed mobile phone video shows soldiers attacking the monastery.

The video is a part of a of mixed media installations and video works of the exhibition ‘Burning Against the Dying of the Light’, by veteran film makers Ritu Sarin and Tensing Sonam, who are also the founders of the Dharamshala International Film Festival. On display at Khoj Studios, the exhibition brings forth the struggle of a land that those living in banishment in India and elsewhere still hope to return to.

“We had a lot of footage lying around for many years. We decided to put together a show because it will help the Tibetan struggle to move in the right direction,” said Sarin, who along with Sonam made the Tibetan feature film, ‘Dreaming Lhasa’, that premiered at the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival.

‘Burning Against the Dying of the Light’ – also the centrepiece of the show – examines the recent self-immolation protests in Tibet. A number of these fiery protests have been captured on mobile phones and, at great risk to the sender, secretly made available to the outside world. These bring home in graphic and horrific detail, the physical reality of self-immolation. In this, the Wheel of Light and Darkness is created like a mixed-media sculpture.

Then there is the other video named ‘Funeral #2’ which had made headlines in the capital three years ago. It follows the sacrifice and cremation of Jamphel Yeshi who set himself alight during a peaceful demonstration in the heart of Delhi on March 26, 2012. 

Another work, ‘Nets in the Sky, Traps on the Ground, Video, printed material’ is a series of Orwellian phrases taken from official Chinese documents that describe some of the many control mechanisms and restrictive measures aimed at Tibetans will be projected on the walls and ceiling.

‘Memorial’, a mixed-media installation, consists of a recreation of the self-immolator, Jamphel YeshiÂ’s sleeping area in his rented room in Majnu ka Tila, the Tibetan refugee settlement in Delhi, exactly as he left it on the morning of his self-immolation.

The ‘Taking Tiger Mountain by Storm’ video installation, being shown for the first time, re-deploys recently acquired Chinese police footage of a large-scale raid on a small village in Central Tibet, converting it from a security apparatus archival record to a parody of what Communism means today in Tibet.

‘Two Friends’ is a 10-minute-long single-channel video of Ngawang Norphel, 22, and Tenzin Khedup, 24, both monks, who took a vow to die together.

Apart from these works, the ‘Stranger in My Native Land’ documentary by Tenzing Sonam, a poignant and personal account of his first visit to his homeland, is also being shown.

The show is on at Khoj Studios, S-17, Khirkee Extension till December 31 from 11 AM to 7 PM. (IANS) (Image: nytimes)

 

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Self Immolation: Young Tibetan Monk sets himself on fire in 150th ceremony in protest to Chinese rule in Tibetan areas

Jamyang Losal, aged about 22, set himself ablaze at around 5:00 a.m. on May 19 near the People’s Hospital in Kangtsa (in Chinese, Gangcha) county in Qinghai’s Tsojang (Haibei) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, a local source told RFA’s Tibetan Service.

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Tibetan monk Jamyang Losal is shown in an undated photo. RFA

Tibet, May 28, 2017– A young Tibetan monk set himself on fire and died on Friday in northwestern China’s Qinghai province in an apparent challenge to Chinese rule in Tibetan areas, a Tibetan living in the area said.

The protest brought to 150 the number of self-immolations by Tibetans living in China since the wave of fiery protests began in 2009.

Jamyang Losal, aged about 22, set himself ablaze at around 5:00 a.m. on May 19 near the People’s Hospital in Kangtsa (in Chinese, Gangcha) county in Qinghai’s Tsojang (Haibei) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, a local source told RFA’s Tibetan Service.

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“He did not survive his protest,” RFA’s source said, speaking on condition of anonymity

“Losal’s body was taken away by the police, and when his family members went to the police station to claim his remains, the police refused to comply with their request,” he said.

“Losal was a monk belonging to Gyerteng monastery in Kangtsa’s Nangra town,” RFA’s source said, adding that about 20 monks now study at the monastery, which is located about 30 kilometers (18 miles) south of the Kangtsa county seat.

Losal was a native of Dong Gya village in Kangtsa county’s Nangra township, the source said.(RFA)

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Ongoing Art Exhibition in New Delhi focusses on Tantric art to entice people with its mystery

An ongoing art exhibition in New Delhi aims at proving to people that the idea of 'Tantra' is much more than eerie and pointless mumbo jumbo

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Rituals performed by a priest in a temple (representational image), Wikimedia

New Delhi, Feb 16, 2017: The idea of Tantra has been shrouded in mystery, esoteric ‘mumbo jumbo’, wild speculation, gross misunderstandings and sheer fantasy. The explicit imagery, lavishly coloured multi-appendaged deities in union with consorts are on on display at an ongoing art exhibition.

In the mid-20th century as modern art came under the influence of abstract ideals, with the rise of “Abstract Expressionism” and “Post Painterly Abstraction”, painting fore-fronted western modern art movements where basic symbolic forms became the norm in western modern art.

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As Indian modern artists came increasingly in contact with Western modernist movements, they recognised increasing similarity with these International modern art forms and their own indigenous tantric motifs that they began incorporating into their art works.

For the most part, the Indian contemporary modern artists were not specifically practicing tantra but they in various creative ways incorporated this familiar imagery into their works of art.

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The works of Raza, Sohan Qadri and even M.F. Husain are good examples of this. However, skilfully these works used the tantric iconography they did not necessarily portray a direct tantric experience of the maker.

“Tantra” curated By Bryan Mulvihill, is on at Art Konsult in Hauz Khas Village till February 18.

The show includes a range of vivid and rich coloured canvases, created by numerous masters and contemporaries. It depicts the ancient culture and method of tantra that was a highly believed and used technique in the past.

The exhibit brings tales from the yesteryears in colourful forms and gives a glimpse of the spiritual side of ancient India. Through mediums like acrylic, watercolours and mix media the essence of tantra was portrayed to the audience.

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“Tantra has always been a subject of anonymity for everyone, but this exhibition will provide people a sneak peek into the world of tantra through the means of extraordinary art works created by masters and contemporaries,” said Siddhartha Tagore, owner of Art Konsult.

“These colorful and bold works will surely attract art lovers of the capital,” he added.

The paintings on display burst out loud with bright colours and eye striking colour combinations. Each artwork depicts the spiritual method in every explicit manner and let spectators to go in flow with the visual treat displayed at the exhibition. (IANS)

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Kun-Faya & Fun art exhibition at India Habitat Centre in Delhi

"The acrylic colors from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings"

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Painting at India Habitat Centre (Representational image, Credits-Wikimedia)

New Delhi, February 8, 2017: Artist Ghazali Moinuddin’s solo art show titled “Kun-Faya-Fun” presented the audience its vibe & ethereal colors depicting the various shades of the nature.

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Organised at India Habitat Centre in the national capital, his paintings are all landscapes which show the beauty of the Nature. From the mist trapped within the woods to the mountain peaks covered in snow, Moinuddin’s every stroke brings it all alive.

Moinuddin has not drawn any inspiration while painting this series, for him it is all about his imagination. For him, nature has no boundaries, it has freedom.

“Imagination and inspiration are contradictory for me, it is disturbing rather. My paintings depend a lot on my mood. I have not been much to any hill station in past few years but all these are an outcome of my imaginative power,” Moinuddin told IANS.

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The artist didn’t use any brush while working on the 40 paintings. “The acrylic colours from tubes are directly put on canvas and I used my fingers to draw the paintings,” he said about his art work which took him two years to complete.

“The semi-realistic paintings create a 3D effect, the more you keep distance from the paintings, the better you can visualise it,” the artist said about his paintings.

The exhibition will go on till February 9, 2017. (IANS)