Tuesday August 20, 2019

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can Detect Signs of Irregular Heart Rhythm

The research could improve the efficiency of the EKG, a noninvasive and widely available method of heart disease screening

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Artificial Intelligence, Heart, Rhythm
The AI-enabled EKG can detect recent atrial fibrillation that occurred without symptoms or that is impending, potentially improving treatment options. Pixabay

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm — atrial fibrillation (AF) — in an electrocardiogram (EKG), even if the heart is in normal rhythm at the time of a test, says new Mayo Clinic research.

The AI-enabled EKG can detect recent atrial fibrillation that occurred without symptoms or that is impending, potentially improving treatment options.

The research could improve the efficiency of the EKG, a noninvasive and widely available method of heart disease screening, said the study published in The Lancet.

While common, atrial fibrillation often is fleeting and is challenging to diagnose.

Artificial Intelligence, Heart, Rhythm
Artificial Intelligence (AI) can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm — atrial fibrillation (AF) — in an electrocardiogram (EKG), even if the heart is in normal rhythm at the time of a test, says new Mayo Clinic research. Pixabay

“When people come in with a stroke, we really want to know if they had atrial fibrillation in the days before the stroke, because it guides the treatment,” said Paul Friedman, Chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Mayo Clinic.

Blood thinners are very effective for preventing another stroke in people with atrial fibrillation.

“For those without atrial fibrillation, using blood thinners increases the risk of bleeding without substantial benefit. That’s important knowledge. We want to know if a patient has AF,” said Friedman.

Researchers tested AI on normal-rhythm EKGs from a group of 36,280 patients, of whom 3,051 were known to have atrial fibrillation. The AI-enabled EKG correctly identified the subtle patterns of atrial fibrillation with 90 per cent accuracy.

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If proven out, AI-guided EKGs could direct the right treatment for disease caused by atrial fibrillation, even without symptoms.

Moreover, this technology can be processed using a smartphone or watch, making it readily available on a large scale. (IANS)

Next Story

Eating More Plant-Based Foods Link to Better Heart Health

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the researchers reviewed a database of food intake information from more than 10,000 middle-aged US adults

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Eating a larger proportion of plant-based foods and a smaller proportion of animal-based foods may help reduce your risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other type of cardiovascular disease. Pixabay

Eating more plant-based foods and fewer animal-based foods may be linked to better heart health and a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests.

“Eating a larger proportion of plant-based foods and a smaller proportion of animal-based foods may help reduce your risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other type of cardiovascular disease,” said study lead researcher, Casey M. Rebholz, Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the US.

Published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the researchers reviewed a database of food intake information from more than 10,000 middle-aged US adults who were monitored from 1987 through 2016 and did not have cardiovascular disease at the start of the study.

Plant, Foods, Heart
Eating more plant-based foods and fewer animal-based foods may be linked to better heart health and a lower risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases, a new study suggests. Pixabay

Those who ate the most plant-based foods overall had a 16 per cent lower risk of having a cardiovascular disease such as heart attacks, stroke, heart failure and other conditions; 32 per cent lower risk of dying from a cardiovascular disease and 25 per cent lower risk of dying from any cause compared to those who ate the least amount of plant-based foods.

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“Our findings underscore the importance of focusing on your diet. There might be some variability in terms of individual foods but to reduce cardiovascular disease risk people should eat more vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fruits, legumes and fewer animal-based foods,” Rebholz said. (IANS)