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Now Comes Artificial Intelligence (AI)-Designed Perfumes For Sale

The company also plans to introduce "Philyra" into their Perfumery School to help train the next generation of perfumers, firmly embedding AI into the heart of its organisation

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Artificial Intelligence now helps design novel perfumes.

Tech major IBM and Symrise, one of the top global producers of flavours and fragrances, have created industry’s first Artificial Intelligence (AI)-designed perfumes for sale.

The AI-based system named “Philyra” can learn about perfume formulas, raw materials, historical success data and industry trends, IBM Research said in a statement late on Saturday.

“Building on previous IBM research using AI to pair flavours and for recipe creation, as well as our new IBM Research AI for Product Composition, we created Philyra,” said Richard Goodwin, Principal Research Scientist, IBM Research.

The AI tool uses new and advanced Machine Learning (ML) algorithms to sift through hundreds of thousands of formulas and thousands of raw materials, helping identify patterns and novel combinations.

“Philyra does more than serve up inspiration – it can design entirely new fragrance formulas by exploring the entire landscape of fragrance combinations to discover the whitespaces in the global fragrance market,” Goodwin added.

When it comes to new perfume design, “Philyra” learns a distance model to identify fragrances that are close in smell to existing fragrances.

AI scenarios present ethical issues ranging from privacy, human rights, employment or other social issues.
The AI-based system named “Philyra” can learn about perfume formulas, raw materials, historical success data and industry trends. Pixabay

The larger the distance between a fragrance and its neighbours, the more novel the perfume is predicted to be.

Symrise has used “Philyra” to design two perfumes, scheduled to launch in mid-2019.

Symrise’s long-term goal is to introduce this technology to their master perfumers around the globe and continue to use the solution for the design of fragrances for personal care and home care products.

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The company also plans to introduce “Philyra” into their Perfumery School to help train the next generation of perfumers, firmly embedding AI into the heart of its organisation.

“Our research continues to push the boundaries of augmenting human expertise using AI and demonstrating how AI can assist in domains where creativity is key,” said Goodwin. (IANS)

Next Story

Google AI Can Now Predict Lung Cancer Accurately

The research was published in the journal Nature Medicine

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A Google logo is displayed at the entrance to the internet based company's offices in Toronto. VOA

A team of Google researchers has used a deep-learning algorithm to detect lung cancer accurately from computed scans.

The work demonstrates the potential for Artificial Intelligence (AI) to increase both accuracy and consistency, which could help accelerate adoption of lung cancer screening worldwide.

Lung cancer is the deadliest of all cancers worldwide — more than breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers combined — and it’s the sixth most common cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization.

“Using advances in 3D volumetric modeling alongside datasets from our partners (including Northwestern University), we’ve made progress in modeling lung cancer prediction as well as laying the groundwork for future clinical testing,” Shravya Shetty, M.S. Technical Lead at Google explained in a blog post late Monday.

Google researchers created a model that can not only generate the overall lung cancer malignancy prediction (viewed in 3D volume) but also identify subtle malignant tissue in the lungs (lung nodules).

Google on an Android device. Pixabay

In the research, Google AI leveraged 45,856 de-identified chest CT screening cases (some in which cancer was found).

“When using a single CT scan for diagnosis, our model performed on par or better than the six radiologists. We detected five per cent more cancer cases while reducing false-positive exams by more than 11 per cent compared to unassisted radiologists in our study,” said Google.

For an asymptomatic patient with no history of cancer, the AI system reviewed and detected potential lung cancer that had been previously called normal.

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These initial results are encouraging, but further studies will assess the impact and utility in clinical practice, said Google.

The research was published in the journal Nature Medicine. (IANS)