Friday November 22, 2019

Artificial Intelligence Can Prove to be a Boon for Patients with Alzheimer’s

The findings demonstrated the potential valid clinical utility of “MemTrax”, administered as part of the online test in screening for variations in cognitive brain health

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Alzheimer's
A lady suffering from Alzheimer's. Flickr

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can prove to be essential for healthcare providers to detect and manage Alzheimer’s disease or a related form of dementia, from which 44 million people suffer worldwide.

In the study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the team introduced supervised Machine Learning (ML) as a modern approach and new value-added complementary tool in cognitive brain health assessment and related patient care and management.

With the increasingly favourable instrument “MemTrax” — an online memory test using image recognition — the clinical efficacy of this new approach as a memory function screening tool has been sufficiently demonstrated.

For the study, a team of researchers including from the Florida Atlantic University, SIVOTEC Analytics and Stanford University employed a novel application of supervised ML and predictive modeling to demonstrate and validate the cross-sectional utility of “MemTrax” as a clinical decision support screening tool for assessing cognitive impairment.

"The question for us now is not how to eliminate cholesterol from the brain, but about how to control cholesterol's role in Alzheimer's disease through the regulation of its interaction with amyloid-beta," Vendruscolo said.
In Alzheimer’s disease, patients start losing memory. Pixabay

The findings demonstrated the potential valid clinical utility of “MemTrax”, administered as part of the online test in screening for variations in cognitive brain health.

“Findings from our study provide an important step in advancing the approach for clinically managing a very complex condition like Alzheimer’s disease,” said lead author Michael F. Bergeron, Senior Vice President, SIVOTEC Analytics.

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“By analysing a wide array of attributes across multiple domains of the human system and functional behaviours of brain health, informed and strategically directed advanced data mining, supervised Machine Learning, and robust analytics can be integral for healthcare providers to detect and anticipate further progression in this disease and myriad other aspects of cognitive impairment,” he explained. (IANS)

Next Story

Exposure to Air Pollution May Trigger Alzheimer’s in Aged Women, Reveals Research

"Our hope is that by better understanding the underlying brain changes caused by air pollution, researchers will be able to develop interventions to help people with or at risk for cognitive decline," Petkus added

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Alzheimer's
A lady suffering from Alzheimer's. Flickr

Women in their 70s and 80s who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution experienced greater declines in memory and more Alzheimer’s-like brain atrophy than their counterparts who breathed cleaner air, new research has revealed.

“This is the first study to really show, in a statistical model, that air pollution was associated with changes in people’s brains and that those changes were then connected with declines in-memory performance,” said study researcher Andrew Petkus, the Assistant Professor University of South California in the US.

Previous research has suggested that fine particle pollution exposure increases the risk for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

What scientists haven’t known is whether PM2.5 alters brain structure and accelerates memory decline.

For the study, published in the journal Brain, researchers used data from 998 women, aged 73 to 87, who had up to two brain scans five years apart as part of the landmark Women’s Health Initiative launched in 1993 by the US National Institutes of Health and enrolled more than 160,000 women to address questions about heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis.

"The question for us now is not how to eliminate cholesterol from the brain, but about how to control cholesterol's role in Alzheimer's disease through the regulation of its interaction with amyloid-beta," Vendruscolo said.
In Alzheimer’s disease, patients start losing memory. Pixabay

Those brain scans were scored on the basis of their similarity to Alzheimer’s disease patterns by a machine learning tool that had been “trained” via brain scans of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers also gathered information about where the 998 women lived, as well as environmental data from those locations to estimate their exposure to fine particle pollution.

When all that information was combined, researchers could see the association between higher pollution exposure, brain changes and memory problems — even after adjusting to taking into account differences in income, education, race, geographic region, cigarette smoking, and other factors.

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“This study provides another piece of the Alzheimer’s disease puzzle by identifying some of the brain changes linking air pollution and memory decline. Each research study gets us one step closer to solving the Alzheimer’s disease epidemic,” Petkus said.

“Our hope is that by better understanding the underlying brain changes caused by air pollution, researchers will be able to develop interventions to help people with or at risk for cognitive decline,” Petkus added. (IANS)