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Artificial Intelligence Capable of Identifying Personality Based on Selfies

Russian researchers reveal that artificial intelligence (AI) is able to infer people's personality from selfies

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is able to infer people's personality from 'selfie'. Pixabay

Russian researchers have revealed that artificial intelligence (AI) is able to infer people’s personality from ‘selfie’ photographs better than human raters do. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, revealed that personality predictions based on female faces appeared to be more reliable than those for male faces.

The technology can be used to find the ‘best matches’ in customer service, dating or online tutoring, the researchers from HSE University and Open University in Russia, said. Studies asking human raters to make personality judgments based on photographs have produced inconsistent results, suggesting that our judgments are too unreliable to be of any practical importance. According to the study, there are strong theoretical and evolutionary arguments to suggest that some information about personality characteristics, particularly, those essential for social communication, might be conveyed by the human face.

After all, face and behaviour are both shaped by genes and hormones, and social experiences resulting from one’s appearance may affect one’s personality development.

However, the recent evidence from neuroscience suggests that instead of looking at specific facial features, the human brain processes images of faces in a holistic manner.

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AI is able to infer people’s personalities from ‘selfie’ photographs better than human raters do. Pixabay

For the findings, the researchers teamed up with a Russian-British business start-up BestFitMe to train a cascade of artificial neural networks to make reliable personality judgments based on photographs of human faces.

The performance of the resulting model was above that discovered in previous studies which used machine learning or human raters.

The artificial intelligence was able to make above-chance judgments about conscientiousness, neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness, and openness based on ‘selfies’ the volunteers uploaded online.

The resulting personality judgments were consistent across different photographs of the same individuals.

The study was done in a sample of 12,000 volunteers who completed a self-report questionnaire measuring personality traits based on the “Big Five” model and uploaded a total of 31,000 ‘selfies’. The respondents were randomly split into a training and a test group.

A series of neural networks were used to preprocess the images to ensure consistent quality and characteristics and exclude faces with emotional expressions, as well as pictures of celebrities and cats.

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Artificial intelligence predicts personality efficiently based on selfies. Pixabay

Next, an image classification neural network was trained to decompose each image into 128 invariant features, followed by a multi-layer perceptron that used image invariants to predict personality traits.

In comparison with the meta-analytic estimates of correlations between self-reported and observer ratings of personality traits, the findings indicate that an artificial neural network relying on static facial images outperforms an average human rater who meets the target in person without prior acquaintance.

Also Read: Indian-American Businessman Urges Trump to Reopen with “common sense precautions”

Conscientiousness emerged to be more easily recognizable than the other four traits. Personality predictions based on female faces appeared to be more reliable than those for male faces, the study said. (IANS)

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Google to Teach Journalists Power of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

Google introduces free Artificial Intelligence and Machine learning training for journalists

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Artificial Intelligence to be taught to journalists by Google. Pixabay

Google has launched a free training course in 17 languages to teach journalists around the world what impact can Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) have on their profession.

In a global survey conducted by Google last year about the use of AI by news organizations, most respondents highlighted the urgent need to educate and train their newsroom on the potential offered by machine learning and other AI-powered technologies.

“Improving AI literacy was seen as vital to change culture and improve understanding of new tools and systems,” said Mattia Peretti, who manages the programme called JournalismAI.

The new training course is produced by JournalismAI in collaboration with VRT News and the Google News Initiative (GNI).

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Journalists to learn Artificial Intelligence, says Google. Pixabay

They realized that more the newsroom at large embraces the technology and generates the ideas and expertise for AI projects, the better the outcome.

“This Introduction to Machine Learning is built by journalists, for journalists, and it will help answer questions such as: What is machine learning? How do you train a machine learning model? What can journalists and news organizations do with it and why is it important to use it responsibly?” said Google.

The course is available in 17 different languages on the Google News Initiative Training Centre.

By logging in, you can track your progress and get a certificate when you complete the course.

The training centre also has a variety of other courses to help journalists find, verify and tell news stories online.

It’s a tough time for journalists and news organisations worldwide, as they try to assess the impact that COVID-19 will have on the business and editorial side of the industry.

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Artificial Intelligence is essential for journalists of today, says Google.

“With JournalismAI, we want to play our role in helping to minimize costs and enhance opportunities for the industry through these new technologies,” said Google.

At the end of the course, the users will find a list of recommended resources, produced by journalism and technology experts across the world, that have been instrumental in designing Introduction to Machine Learning.

Also Read: Give Your Coloured Hair The Most Essential Care During Lockdown

“After this course, and the previous training module with strategic suggestions on AI adoption, we are planning to design more training resources on Artificial Intelligence and machine learning for journalists later this year,” said Peretti. (IANS)

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Businesses Have to Patiently Work with AI, its no Magic: Microsoft

AI is not magic, companies need to maintain patience, says Microsoft

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Microsoft says AI is not magic companies need to work patiently. Pixabay

At a time when Artificial Intelligence (AI) has demonstrated the profound impact it can have on society, the technology is no magic and the outcome of implementing an AI model has a direct correlation to the underlying data that has gone into training it, a top Microsoft executive said on Wednesday.

Building an AI model involves eternal iterations, and the outcome only gets better with new or more data over time.

“Do not expect human parity on day one. Businesses need to invest in the evolution of the model that may take umpteen number of iterations, even before it reaches an acceptable level of accuracy and precision,” according to Sandeep Alur, Director, Microsoft Technology Center, India.

By attaining human parity across vision, speech, and text, AI has the potential to have a significant impact on business outcomes.

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Artificial Intelligence needs to be worked with patience, says Microsoft. Pixabay

“For organisations that are still trying to figure out their AI journey, they have to be realistic, invest in the evolution of an AI model, set guardrails for responsible AI and establish trust,” Alur said in a statement.

Microsoft has identified six principles for responsible AI that guide the development and use of AI with people at the centre.

These are – fairness, reliability and safety, privacy and security, inclusiveness, transparency and accountability.

“Organisations may develop their own principles according to the nature of their business, but the guiding principles will ensure that their AI models are trustworthy,” said Alur.

Also Read: Liquor Does Not Go With The Fight Against Covid-19

Implementing AI in an organisation needs business and technology leaders to invest in defining an operating manifesto to uplift the spirit of responsible AI, he added. (IANS)

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AI Tool Predicts Respiratory Disease in COVID-19 Patients

Published in the journal Computers, Materials & Continua, the study also revealed the best indicators of future severity, and found that they were not as expected

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An Artificial Intelligence (AI) tool has accurately predicted which patients, newly infected with the COVID-19 virus, would go on to develop severe respiratory disease. Pixabay

An Artificial Intelligence (AI) tool has accurately predicted which patients, newly infected with the COVID-19 virus, would go on to develop severe respiratory disease.

Published in the journal Computers, Materials & Continua, the study also revealed the best indicators of future severity, and found that they were not as expected.

“Our goal was to design and deploy a decision-support tool using AI capabilities – mostly predictive analytics – to flag future clinical coronavirus severity,” said co-author Anasse Bari, a clinical assistant professor in Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University.

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The researchers were surprised to find that characteristics considered to be hallmarks of COVID-19, like certain patterns seen in lung images, fever, and strong immune responses, were not useful in predicting which of the many patients with initial, mild symptoms would go to develop severe lung disease. Pixabay

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For the study, demographic, laboratory, and radiological findings were collected from 53 patients as each tested positive in January for the SARS-CoV2 virus at the two Chinese hospitals.

Symptoms were typically mild to begin with, including cough, fever and stomach upset.

In a minority of patients, however, severe symptoms developed with a week, including pneumonia.

For the new study, the researchers designed computer models that make decisions based on the data fed into them, with programmes getting “smarter” the more data they consider.

The researchers were surprised to find that characteristics considered to be hallmarks of COVID-19, like certain patterns seen in lung images, fever, and strong immune responses, were not useful in predicting which of the many patients with initial, mild symptoms would go to develop severe lung disease.

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Neither were age and gender helpful in predicting serious disease, although past studies had found men over 60 to be at higher risk.

Instead, the new AI tool found that changes in three features – levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT), reported myalgia, and haemoglobin levels – were most accurately predictive of subsequent, severe disease.

Also Read- Stop Smoking or You May Lose Your Voice

Together with other factors, the team reported being able to predict risk of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome or ARDS with up to 80 per cent accuracy.

“We hope that the tool, when fully developed, will be useful to physicians as they assess which moderately ill patients really need beds, and who can safely go home, with hospital resources stretched thin,” Bari added. (IANS)