Saturday January 25, 2020

Artificial Intelligence Can Better Help Doctors To Recognize Cancer Cells

A major technical challenge in systematically studying the tumor microenvironment is how to automatically classify different types of cells and quantify their spatial distributions

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Cancer
The Artificial Intelligence algorithm helps pathologists obtain the most accurate cancer cell analysis - in a much faster way. Pixabay

Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern have developed a software tool that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images – giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes.

The spatial distribution of different types of cells can reveal a cancer’s growth pattern, its relationship with the surrounding microenvironment, and the body’s immune response.

But the process of manually identifying all the cells in a pathology slide is extremely labor intensive and error-prone.

“To make a diagnosis, pathologists usually only examine several ‘representative’ regions in detail, rather than the whole slide. However, some important details could be missed by this approach,” said Dr. Guanghua “Andy” Xiao, corresponding author of a study published in EbioMedicine.

A major technical challenge in systematically studying the tumor microenvironment is how to automatically classify different types of cells and quantify their spatial distributions.

The AI algorithm that Dr Xiao and his team developed, called “ConvPath”, overcomes these obstacles by using AI to classify cell types from lung cancer pathology images.

The ConvPath algorithm can “look” at cells and identify their types based on their appearance in the pathology images using an AI algorithm that learns from human pathologists.

Cancer
Researchers at University of Texas Southwestern have developed a software tool that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to recognize cancer cells from digital pathology images – giving clinicians a powerful way of predicting patient outcomes. Pixabay

The algorithm helps pathologists obtain the most accurate cancer cell analysis – in a much faster way.

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“It is time-consuming and difficult for pathologists to locate very small tumour regions in tissue images, so this could greatly reduce the time that pathologists need to spend on each image,” said Dr Xiao. (IANS)

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Tech Giant Samsung Creates In-House Technology Platform Unit

The latest reshuffle follows changes to leadership at Samsung on Monday. Earlier the company named a new mobile business chief, and promoted 162 executives

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samsung
Samsung combined its in-house tech units related with Artificial Intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT) and big data solutions to set up a new tech group, tentatively named "next-generation platform centre. Wikimedia Commons

Samsung Electronics created an in-house technology platform unit and named a new chief for its home appliance business in the company’s latest reshuffle, corporate sources said here on Thursday.

Samsung combined its in-house tech units related with Artificial Intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT) and big data solutions to set up a new tech group, tentatively named “next-generation platform centre,” Yonhap news agency reported, citing company officials.

The centre will be headed by Chung Eui-suk, an executive vice president who is best known for leading the development of Samsung’s AI-based digital assistant, Bixby. The South Korean tech giant also appointed Lee Jae-seung, former Consumer Electronics (CE) business division development team leader, to head its home appliance business.

Previously, Kim Hyun-suk, President and CEO of Samsung’s CE business division, co-held the title as home appliance business chief. It was revealed in Samsung’s senior executive reshuffle on Monday that Kim no longer heads the company’s home appliances business, although he retains his CEO position for Samsung’s CE business division.

Samsung
Samsung Electronics created an in-house technology platform unit and named a new chief for its home appliance business in the company’s latest reshuffle. Wikimedia Commons

Lee Won-jin, an executive vice president who leads the service business team at Samsung’s visual display unit, will serve the same job for the company’s mobile business unit. The move will allow Lee, former managing director at Google Korea, to focus on developing contents services for both mobile phones and TVs.

The latest reshuffle follows changes to leadership at Samsung on Monday. Earlier the company named a new mobile business chief, and promoted 162 executives.

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Samsung usually announces personnel reshuffles in December, but the appointments were delayed as trials involving Samsung Group heir Lee Jae-yong and key executives have dragged out longer than expected. (IANS)