Friday September 20, 2019

Novel Artificial Pancreas System To Control Blood Sugar Levels in a Better Way

The device was shown to work for children as young as six - a crucial finding for a condition which often strikes in childhood

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Diabetes
According to the researchers, these novel findings may provide the basis for new therapies for patients who have heart disease complicated by diabetes. Pixabay

A novel artificial pancreas system can control blood sugar levels better than insulin injections for both children and older adults with Type-1 diabetes, results of a clinical trial have shown.

The findings, published in The Lancet, showed that the closed-loop insulin delivery system, as it is called, is better than sensor-augmented pump therapy for blood sugar control and reduced risk of hypoglycaemia — low sugar condition — in poorly controlled Type-1 diabetes patients.

“The use of day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery improves glycaemic control while reducing the risk of hypoglycaemia in adults, adolescents and children with Type-1 diabetes compared to conventional pump therapy or sensor-augmented pump therapy,” said researchers including Roman Hovorka from the UK’s University of Cambridge.

“Type 1 diabetes is a challenging condition, but these results take us a step closer to changing the lives of millions of people that live with the condition across the world,” the researchers added.

The artificial pancreas resembles an iPod and is strapped to patients’ clothing with a small monitor and pump fitted to their skin and can both monitor blood sugar as well as inject insulin automatically if blood sugar gets too high, the Daily Mail reported.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

The device also allows patients to add doses of insulin manually, for example when they are about to eat a big meal.

Insulin pumps, on the other hand, monitors people’s blood sugar levels and warn them when it gets too low or high so they know whether to inject insulin or eat more.

For the trial, the team randomly assigned 44 male and 42 female patients with Type-1 diabetes aged six years and older to receive either hybrid closed-loop therapy or sensor-augmented pump therapy over 12 weeks.

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The amount of time people spent with ‘dangerously’ high or low blood sugar fell by 25 per cent for people using the artificial pancreas, but rose by 18 per cent for people using an ordinary insulin pump, the report said.

The device was shown to work for children as young as six – a crucial finding for a condition which often strikes in childhood. (IANS)

Next Story

Low-Cost Text Messaging Programme Improves Blood Sugar Control in Patients with Diabetes

Capitalising on the exponential growth in mobile phone usage over the past decade, a simple text messaging programme could increase the reach

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Diabetes, Messaging, Blood Sugar
The effect in this study was not only statistically significant but also has the potential to be clinically relevant by reducing risk of diabetic complications and death. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a low-cost text messaging programme improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease.

“The effect in this study was not only statistically significant but also has the potential to be clinically relevant by reducing risk of diabetic complications and death,” said study researcher Xiqian Huo from Fuwai Hospital in China.

“Capitalising on the exponential growth in mobile phone usage over the past decade, a simple text messaging programme could increase the reach of diabetes self-management support,” she added.

It may provide a means to better address the burgeoning healthcare demand-capacity imbalance.

Diabetes, Messaging, Blood Sugar
Researchers have found that a low-cost text messaging programme improves blood sugar control in patients with diabetes and coronary heart disease. Pixabay

For the study presented at the ESC Congress 2019 in France, the researchers enrolled 502 patients from 34 clinics in China and the patients were randomly assigned to the text messaging intervention or a control group for six months.

The intervention group received six messages per week, at random times of the day, from an automated system set up by the researchers.

The messages were designed to provide information and motivation and help patients set goals and manage stress.

The control group received two thank you text messages per month.

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At six months, blood glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to the control group (6.7 per cent versus 7.2 per cent).

On an average, HbA1c fell by 0.2 per cent in the intervention group and rose by 0.1 per cent in the control group – a difference of 0.3 per cent between groups.

The change in fasting blood glucose was larger in the intervention, compared to control, group (-0.5 versus 0.1 mmol/L, respectively).

The intervention was acceptable to participants, 97 per cent found the text messages useful, readable and an appropriate method of contact. (IANS)