Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Researchers warn that consuming artificial sweeteners may increase risks of developing type 2 diabetes. Pixabay

A $2.2 billion industry to help people lose weight through artificial sweeteners may be contributing to type 2 diabetes, researchers have warned.

The study, published in the journal Current Atherosclerosis Reports, also found that people who use low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) are more likely to gain weight, the exact opposite of what consumers expect.


This is despite controlled clinical trials showing that artificial sweeteners do lead to weight loss, the research added.

“There has been a 200 per cent increase in LCS usage among children and a 54 per cent increase among adults in the past 20 years,” said study researcher Peter Clifton from the University of South Australia.

Low calorie sweeteners are used in place of sucrose, glucose and fructose.

They have an intense sweet flavour without the calories, but recent studies have highlighted potential adverse health effects.


Sweeteners have adverse health effects and can contribute to type 2 diabetes. Pixabay

According to the researchers, a US study of 5158 adults over a seven-year period found that those who consumed large quantities of artificial sweeteners gained more weight than non-users.

“Consumers of artificial sweeteners do not reduce their overall intake of sugar. They use both sugar and low-calorie sweeteners and may psychologically feel they can indulge in their favourite foods,” Clifton said.

“Artificial sweeteners also change the gut bacteria which may lead to weight gain and risk of type 2 diabetes,” he added.

Artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) are also linked with increased risks of death and cardiovascular disease, and strokes and dementia among older people, but it is not clear why.

Study researcher Clifton cites 13 studies which investigated the effects of ASB intake on the risk of type 2 diabetes, all of which found either no link or a positive one.

Also Read- Here’s how Instagram Helps Young Adults Develop Friendships in Real Life

One study found that substituting ASB for sugar-sweetened beverages or fruit juices was associated with a five to seven per cent lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

“A better option than low-calorie sweeteners is to stick to a healthy diet, which includes plenty of whole grains, dairy, seafood, legumes, vegetables and fruits and plain water,” Clifton said. (IANS)


Popular

Wikimedia Commons

The most popular version of the rhyme/lullaby

As children, singing the rhyme Rock A Bye Baby was a fun thing to do. It was a statement of thrill and adventure to imagine a child climbing to the top of a tree and rocking to sleep. Especially in the Indian context, rocking a baby to sleep by attaching the cradle to the tree is quite a common thing. But the origin of this rhyme, or lullaby, seems rooted in other histories.

The most popular notion associated with this lullaby is of women leaving their babies tied to tree branches, rocking to sleep with the wind. It is believed that at the time this lullaby was written, it was inspired by a coloniser who saw the Native American women tie their children in birch bark cradles to the trees. The babies went to sleep rocked by the gusts of wind while the parents went about their tasks.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

This image released by Disney Theatrical Productions shows, from second left, Michael James Scott as Genie, Michael Maliakel as Aladdin, and Shoba Narayan as Jasmine after a performance of the Broadway musical "Aladdin" in New York on Sept. 28, 2021

As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — "Aladdin." Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them.

That shared love has gone full-circle this month as Narayan and Maliakel lead the Broadway company of the musical "Aladdin" out of the pandemic, playing Princess Jasmine and the hero from the title, respectively.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

Bottles of Jack Daniel's whiskeys are displayed at Rossi's Deli in San Francisco

Jack Daniel's is the world's most popular whiskey brand, but until recently, few people knew the liquor was created by Nathan "Nearest" Green, an enslaved Black man who mentored Daniel.

"We've always known," says Debbie Staples, a great-great-granddaughter of Green's who heard the story from her grandmother. … "He made the whiskey, and he taught Jack Daniel. And people didn't believe it … it's hurtful. I don't know if it was because he was a Black man."

Keep reading... Show less