Tuesday January 28, 2020
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Artist Renuka Rajiv Takes on Society, Gender Through Personal Narrative

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the "need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages."

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Rajiv described the prints as a "cathartic series" made while living in Melbourne. Flickr Commons

Exhibiting the interplay between words and visuals, a solo show by artist Renuka Rajiv critically chronicles and comments on matters of sexuality, gender, physicality and notions of family and relationships via personal narratives.

“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition, showing different renditions of fabric and paper using drawings, paper mache, tie-dye and embroidery.

It is on at the Vahdera Art Gallery here till August 18.

It includes a large body of textile and embroidery works, sculptures, and twenty four monotypes selected from a larger series of three hundred prints.

The fabric works are mostly made with old garments of the artist’s family and friends.

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“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition. Flickr Common

“This is a moment in a long-term exploration of expressing the aspects of my reality that are outside the material world,” the Bengaluru-based artist said about the exhibition.

Rajiv described the prints as a “cathartic series” made while living in Melbourne.

Some drawings also weave visuals with verbal interjections — sharp observations around gender and sexuality within the larger social context.

“With a strong inclination towards the spontaneously created “hand-made” works, the exhibition accommodates the imaginative, observational and autobiographical,” Vahdera Art Gallery said in a statement.

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the “need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages”.

Also Read: US Painted in New Colours By a Refugee Artist

Rajiv was the recipient of the Emerging Artist Award (EAA) 2016, awarded by the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art (FICA) in collaboration with Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council.

The exhibition is a culmination of the award process including a three-month residency in Switzerland in 2017. (IANS)

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Here’s why Men Think They are Better at Lying than Women

Men think they are better liars than women

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Men think that they are better liars than women. Lifetime Stock

Men are twice as likely as women to consider themselves to be good at lying and getting away with it, researchers have found.

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, revealed that expert liars also prefer to lie face-to-face, rather than via text messages, and social media was the least likely place where they’d tell a lie.

“We found a significant link between expertise at lying and gender. Men were more than twice as likely to consider themselves expert liars who got away with it,” said study researcher Brianna Verigin from the University of Portsmouth in the UK.

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There is a significant link between expertise at lying and gender. Pixabay

Previous research has shown that most people tell one-two lies per day, but that’s not accurate, most people don’t lie everyday but a small number of prolific liars are responsible for the majority of lies reported.

“What stood out in our study was that nearly half (40 per cent) of all lies are told by a very small number of deceivers. And these people will lie with impunity to those closest to them,” Verigin said.

For the findings, the research team surveyed 194 people — half men and half women, with an average age of 39, about their lying habits– how often they told untruths, about what and to whom.

They were asked a series of questions including how good they were at deceiving others, how many lies they would told in the past 24 hours, the type of lies they’d told, who to, and whether they’d done so face-to-face or via other means.

“Time after time, studies have shown we are not as good at detecting lies as we think we are. At best, most of us have a 50:50 chance of getting it right when someone is pulling the wool over our eyes,” Verigin said.

“We wanted to focus on those who are good at lying and try to understand how they do it and to whom,” She said.

The study found one of the key strategies of liars is to tell plausible lies that stay close to the truth, and to not give away much information.

And the better someone thinks they are at lying, the more lies they will tell.

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Men believe that they are expert liars and can get away with it. Lifetime Stock

The most commonly used strategy among all those who admitted to lying, whether experts or poor liars, was to leave out certain information.

But expert liars added to that an ability to weave a believable story embellished with truth, making the lies harder to spot.

In contrast, those who thought they were not good at lying resorted, when they did lie, to being vague.

Overall, of the 194 people, the most common types of deception, in descending order, were ‘white lies’, exaggerations, hiding information, burying lies in a torrent of truth and making up things.

Most people chose to lie face-to-face, then via text message, a phone call, email, and last, via social media.

Most expert liars lie most often to family, friends or colleagues. Employers and authority figures were least likely to be lied to.

Also Read- Bilingual Children are Strong, Creative Storytellers; Says New Study

“Prolific liars rely on a great deal on being good with words, weaving their lies into truths, so it becomes hard for others to distinguish the difference, and they’re also better than most at hiding lies within apparently simple, clear stories which are harder for others to doubt,” Verigin said. (IANS)