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Artists give Malaysian Twist to traditional Chinese Ink Paintings

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Traditional Chinese Ink Painting, Pixabay

Malaysia, April 11, 2017: While traditional Chinese ink paintings are usually associated with scenic landscapes such as mountains, hills, rivers, bamboo forest, pine trees or flowers, a group of local Chinese ink artists have given a Malaysian twist to such Chinese paintings.

They are featured at the Ink Sense Chinese Painting Group Exhibition at contemporary art space L’Atelier Rouge in Jaya One in Petaling Jaya. Six artists are participating in this exhibition.

Collectors and art enthusiasts can spot a distinctly Malaysian flavour or theme in this exhibition, with some works proudly drawing inspiration from traditional kampung settings, rubber trees and batik prints.

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At the show, Ng Yen Tee, 45, whose background is western art, has four artworks based on traditional Malay wooden houses. In her “harmony-centred” works, Ng contemplates on the idea of “home” – for a family and a multi-cultural nation. She uses three colours in her batik designs to symbolise the three dominant races in Malaysia. She also infuses her paintings with a dark ink texture to create a strong contrast for these colours to make each painting “visually more attractive”. Six years ago, she took up Chinese painting lessons from an art teacher in Klang.

Graphic designer Yon Chuk Yim, 48, feels that Chinese ink artworks need not be restricted to traditional themes. She explores a mixture of contemporary techniques, such as color splashes, and overlaying colors over ink.

Yon, whose mentor is Yee Sze Fook, a full time artist, likes to paint on the whim rather than follow a theme.

Veteran artist Shirley Chu Siow Eng, 67, born in Fujian province in China, Chu migrated with her parents to Malaysia when she was five. Choosing rubber trees as her theme, she recalls her younger days when her father explained how rubber plantations provided jobs and resources for the local economy.

Chong Buck Tee, 67, a graduate of the Malaysian Institute of Art 1972, who is one of Malaysia’s foremost Chinese brush painting artists, with a career span of more than 30 years, who has won numerous awards at home and abroad and is currently the president of the Bakti Art Centre in Ampang, and advisor of the Selangor and Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur Shui-Mo Art Society, loves to paint landscapes. At this exhibition, his striking work, Mystic Landscape, has a refreshingly modern feel. “My works are imaginary but based on what I have seen – either from my travels or from pictures,” says Chong.

Others taking part in the exhibition are Dr Kok Ming Fong and Karen Ng.

– Prepared by Upama Bhattacharya. Twitter @Upama_myself

 

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India will soon ask Malaysia to extradite Preacher Zakir Naik

India will soon approach Malaysia with a request to extradite hardline Islamic preacher Zakir Naik.

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India will Request Malayasia to extradite Zakir Naik
India will Request Malayasia to extradite Zakir Naik. wikimedia commons
  • India will seek the Malaysian government’s help in extraditing televangelist Zakir Naik who faces charges of money laundering and inciting hatred through his sermons broadcast on Peace TV, the foreign ministry said Friday.

Zakir Naik obtained permanent residency in Malaysia 

Officials will approach their Malaysian counterparts with the extradition request sometime within the next two weeks, Indian foreign ministry spokesman Raveesh Kumar told a weekly news briefing in New Delhi.

“Any formal request seeking the assistance of a foreign government in cases of extradition requires a completion of the internal legal process involving consultation with other ministries involved in the case,” Kumar said.

“At this stage, we are nearing the completion of this process and as soon as this process is complete we will be making an official request to the Malaysian government in this matter,” Kumar said. “It could be a couple of days or a couple of weeks. But it would be soon and the nature of our request would also be clear.”

Naik fled India a month before terrorist carried out a massacre at a café in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in July 2016. This week, Malaysia’s deputy prime minister said the Islamic preacher legally obtained permanent residency in the country, and that Malaysian authorities would arrest him only if he broke local laws or was found to be involved in terrorist activities.

Naik’s speeches allegedly inspired some of the militants who carried out the siege at the Holey Artisan Bakery café in Dhaka, where 29 people, including 20 hostages and five gunmen, were killed.

In November 2016, the Indian government banned Naik’s Mumbai-based NGO Islamic Research Foundation, which partly funded the Peace TV channel that is banned in India, Bangladesh and several other countries.

Kumar said because the Indian government had knowledge of Naik’s whereabouts, the legal procedures would be tailored to requirements between the two countries in their extradition treaty.

Advocate challenges charges

“Naik is being hounded because he hails from a minority community. The charges that the investigating agencies are trying to frame are all stale and are hardly incriminating,” advocate S. Hariharan told BenarNews in a phone interview from Delhi.

“The charges lack veracity and would not stand scrutiny in the court of law. We will be challenging the extradition and deportation.”

Last week, the Indian government filed a 61-page charge sheet against Naik alleging he was involved in a criminal conspiracy by lauding terrorist organizations. In April, a non-bailable warrant was issued against him in an alleged case of money laundering through his NGO and a shell company.

In Malaysia meanwhile, the opposition Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party (PAS) has urged the government to ignore any request from India to extradite Zakir Naik, Reuters reported.

“For Muslim individuals, even when they won by using arguments and not weapons, like Dr. Zakir Naik, they are considered terrorists because their arguments cannot be countered,” PAS president Abdul Hadi Awang wrote last week in an opinion piece published in Harakah Daily.(BenarNews)

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Asia Cup : India Emerge Champions for third time, Beat Malaysia in Asia Cup Hockey Championship

India emerged victorious for the third time

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(representational Image) India vs Malaysia Hockey Match wikimedia

Dhaka, October 22, 2017 : India overcame Malaysia 2-1 in the final on Sunday to win the Asia Cup hockey championship for the third time.

Ramandeep Singh (3rd minute) and Lalit Upadhyay (29th) scored for India. Shahril Saabah (50th minute) scored the reducer for Malaysia. (IANS)

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Elephant Parade comes to India for the First Time: Statues of 101 life-sized baby elephants transformed into Beautiful works of Art

The parade will travel across the country from November 2017 to March 2018

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Elephant Parade
101 Elephant statues are decorated by artists for the Parade. Wikimedia
  • Elephant family, an NGO, organizes the annual exhibition elephant parade
  • The Elephant Parade is happening in India for the first time
  • The NGO raises awareness for the importance of saving elephant species

August 24, 2017: Statues of 101 life-sized baby elephant that have been transformed into beautiful works of art will be exhibited in Indian cities as part of the 22nd edition of the international “Elephant Parade”, happening in the country for the first time, it was announced here on Wednesday.

“Elephant Parade” is an annual exhibition, that is organized in different cities across the world by NGO Elephant Family to raise awareness for the need for conserving elephants.

ALSO READ: A 20-year-old Elephant gets blessing at a Kerala Church

The organizers say that 20 per cent of the net profits from the show are donated to elephant welfare and conservation projects.

The parade will travel across the country from November 2017 to March 2018.

For this, leading Indian artists, fashion designers, design institutes, tribal painters, and celebrities were engaged to turn 101 elephant sculptures into unique masterpieces, creating a striking spectacle of color to celebrate one of India’s most beloved and endangered animals.

The painted elephants will be displayed in herds in prominent cities to be photographed, hugged and kissed by admiring audiences as part of what has become recognized as the world’s biggest public art event.

The parade aims to generate funds to secure 101 elephant corridors across India for the pachyderms, who face the risk of displacement through fragmentation of their habitat and human disturbances.

Thus, after the public displays across Indian cities, the elephants will then be sold at two high profile auctions in Mumbai and London to raise funds.

“We will celebrate the magnificence of the iconic Asian elephant, generating mass awareness of their plight and making everyone smile at the same time,” said Ruth Powys-Ganesh, the CEO of Elephant Family in India.

“With the support of the world’s top creatives, the 101 painted elephants will move us closer to our target to secure a network of 101 elephant corridors – vital strips of habitat that reconnect India’s forests, the number one priority for this species,” she added.

Other Asian cities where the parade has been held include Suzhou, Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Hong Kong. It has also been held in Taiwan. (IANS)