Saturday February 16, 2019
Home Uncategorized Xinhua commen...

Xinhua commentary: Asia-Pacific main theater of China-US interplay

0
//

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Beijing: China and the US must not allow the Asia Pacific region to “retrogress into a destructive wrestling ring” Xinhua news agency said. The US is unable to discard its outdated Cold War mentality, it added.

Photo credit: usnews.com
Photo credit: usnews.com

The Xinhua commentary “Asia-Pacific not China-US wrestling ring” said that as Chinese President Xi Jinping wraps up his first state visit to the US, China-US interaction in the Asia-Pacific region is entering a more predictable and reassuring track.

“A series of signals emanating from the trip…indicate that both of the two giants understand the need and share the desire to maintain peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region,” it said.

The commentary on Saturday said that against the backdrop of tangible worries in “international punditry that the region is turning into a ring for China and the United States to wrestle for influence, their latest agreement to deepen dialogue on Asia-Pacific affairs is encouraging”.

The Asia-Pacific is the main theater of China-US interplay. Having the world’s largest developing and developed countries under its roof, it bears the lion’s share of both their common interests and their differences and frictions.

Xinhua said that the Asia-Pacific is vital to global peace and development. It now carries 40 percent of human population, 48 percent of world trade and 57 percent of global output.

“That is why China-US engagement in the Asia-Pacific is important. Positive, it benefits all; negative, it harms all.”

The commentary went on to say that Washington’s sizeable enlargement of its already formidable military presence in the Asia-Pacific has “emboldened some claimants in the South China Sea territorial disputes to make counter-productively aggressive moves, although the United States pledges not to take sides on the complex rows”.

“At the root of those impediments is Washington’s inability to discard the outdated Cold War mentality.”

It said that the key is to strengthen bilateral contact and communication and cement mutual understanding. On top of that, they need to tighten the intermingling of interests and deepen their interdependence.

To bridge the trust deficit, “the two countries can beef up military-to-military ties, rev up consultations on the Korean Peninsula denuclearization issue, and speed up negotiations on a bilateral investment treaty”.

The Xinhua commentary noted that Beijing’s stance on China-US interaction in the Asia-Pacific is consistent and explicit: “The vast Pacific Ocean is big enough to accommodate both China and the United States, and China welcomes the US to play a constructive role in the region”.

“During the Chinese president’s state visit to the United States, that message has become ever clearer. It is incumbent on the two countries to seize the positive momentum and build the Asia-Pacific into a dancing pool for the benefit of all, instead of allowing it to retrogress into a destructive wrestling ring,” it added.

With inputs from IANS

Next Story

Research Finds US Power and Influence as a Greater Threat than Russia and China

The list of countries most likely to view the U.S. as a threat is topped by two key allies in the Asia-Pacific: South Korea and Japan.

0
US, Donald Trump
"The President is once again delivering on his promise to build the wall, protect the border, and secure our great country," White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said. VOA

More people around the world worry about the threat posed by the United States’ use of power and influence than they do about similar threats from Russia or China.

The finding, part of Pew Research Center’s Spring 2018 Global Attitudes Survey, found a median of 45 percent of more than 27,000 respondents in 26 countries view U.S. power and influence as a threat, compared to 37 percent for Russia and 35 percent for China.

The list of countries most likely to view the U.S. as a threat is topped by two key allies in the Asia-Pacific: South Korea and Japan.

Donald Trump, North Korea
FILE – A man reads a newspaper reporting on the summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at a newspaper stand in Seoul, South Korea, June 12, 2018. VOA

In South Korea, 67 percent of respondents listed the U.S. as a threat. In Japan, it was 66 percent.

Mexico was third, with 64 percent of respondents calling U.S. power and influence a major threat. Previous Pew surveys found views of the U.S. in Mexico nose-dived following the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in 2016.

Data published by Pew in October 2018 found 6 percent of Mexicans expressed confidence in Trump’s leadership, due in part to strong opposition to his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico.

In another four countries — Tunisia, Argentina, Brazil and Indonesia — more than half of the respondents viewed U.S. power and influence as a threat.

And 49 percent of respondents in France and Germany saw the U.S. as a threat.

Pew researchers call the increased wariness of the U.S. the biggest change in sentiment of all the threats tracked by the survey.

In 2013, about 25 percent of survey respondents from 22 countries saw U.S. power and influence as a threat. But by 2017, following Trump’s election, that had risen to 38 percent.

U.S. security policy under Trump has emphasized what officials have described as a new era of great power competition, labeling Russia and China top threats to the U.S. and the world.

Donald Trump, South Korea
In South Korea, 67 percent of respondents listed the U.S. as a threat. Pixabay

During his first day on the job, acting U.S. Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan said his top concern was, “China, China, China.”

But based on the results of the survey, many people around the world are not convinced.

Poland was the only country where more than half of the respondents saw Russian influence and power a major threat.

Respondents seem to be more worried about China, though only in four countries did more than half of the respondents see China as a danger.

A median of 82 percent of South Koreans surveyed viewed Chinese influence and power as a major threat, followed by 69 percent in Japan, 56 percent in the Philippines, and 51 percent in Australia.

In the U.S., 50 percent of the respondents viewed Russian influence and power as a threat, compared to 48 percent who felt the same about China.

Late last month, the U.S. intelligence community’s annual Worldwide Threat Assessment report warned of waning U.S. influence across the globe, even among allies, with Russia and China seeking to fill the void.

Many U.S. allies, the report said, are “seeking greater independence from Washington in response to their perceptions of changing U.S. policies on security and trade.”

ALSO READ: US Shutdown Averted, Border Deal Reached

The Pew survey of 27,612 people in 26 countries was conducted between May 14 and Aug. 12, 2018.

It listed the top perceived threats as climate change, the Islamic State terror group, cyberattacks and North Korea’s nuclear program. (VOA)