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11 Must-Know Facts About Asima Chatterjee

Her publications are extensively cited and most of her work is included in several textbooks

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Asima Chatterjee was the first Indian woman to hold a doctorate. Wikimedia Commons
Asima Chatterjee was the first Indian woman to hold a doctorate. Wikimedia Commons
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Asima Chatterjee was an organic chemist noted for her work in organic chemistry and phytomedicine. She also authored a considerable volume of work on medicinal plants, also she was the first woman to receive a Doctorate of Science from an Indian university. On 23rd September 2017 (her 100th birth anniversary), Google honoured her with a Google doodle. 

Here are 11 facts about Asima Chatterjee you must know: 

ALSO READ: 10 must-know facts about Anand Mahindra

1. Asima Chatterjee’s research primarily focused on the medicinal properties of Indian plants and contributed to developing drugs that treated epilepsy and malaria.

2. One of her most esteemed discoveries came in the field of vinca alkaloids which are used in chemotherapy today.

3. Her achievements won her many prestigious accolades including received the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Award (1961) and the Padma Bhushan (1975) – one of the highest civilian awards bestowed by the Indian government.

4. In 1944, she was appointed as an Honorary Lecturer in Chemistry, Calcutta University. In 1947, she worked with L.M. Parks University of Wisconsin, USA.

Calcutta University became her permanent address until her death in 2006. Wikimedia Commons
Calcutta University became her permanent address until her death in 2006. Wikimedia Commons

5. Asima Chatterjee was appointed Reader in the Department of Pure Chemistry, Calcutta University in 1954. It also became her permanent address until her death.

6. In 1962, Asima Chatterjee became the 10 Khaira Professor of Chemistry, one of the most prestigious and coveted Chairs of the Calcutta University which she adorned till 1982 and was the first woman scientist to adorn a chair of any
University in India.

7. In 1975, she became the first woman to be appointed the general president of the Indian Science Congress.

8. Asima Chatterjee also established a Regional Research Institute for carrying out research on Indian medicinal plants for the development of Ayurvedic drugs along with an Ayurvedic Hospital for systematic clinical trials through a unique Centre-State collaboration, under the aegis of the Central Council for Research in Ayurveda and Siddha in Salt Lake City, Kolkata.

ALSO READ: 12 Facts About Nain Singh Rawat

9. Asima Chatterjee developed the anti-epileptic drug, Ayush-56 from Marsilia minuta, also the anti-malarial drug from Alstonia scholaris, Swrrtia chirata, Picrorphiza kurroa and Ceasalpinna crista. These patented drugs have been marketed by several companies.

10. Chatterjee had published 400 papers in national and international journals. Her publications are extensively cited and most of her work is included in several textbooks.

11. It is said that she developed the interest in medicinal plants because of her father, Dr Indra Narayan Mukherjee, a medical man cum amateur.

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Hubble Returns To Normal Functioning Soon: NASA

After the engineering tests have been completed, Hubble is expected to soon return to normal science operations, NASA stated

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NASA, tissue
NASA to send tissue chips to space to test human health, genetic changes. Flcikr

NASA has brought Hubble Space Telescope’s seven-year old backup gyroscope (gyro) back to life, after the spacecraft entered safe mode due to a failed gyro earlier this month, the US space agency said on Tuesday.

A gyro is a device that measures the speed at which the spacecraft is turning and is needed to help Hubble turn and lock on to new targets.

Hubble’s backup gyro, which had been off for more than 7.5 years, was incorrectly returning extremely high rotation rates, NASA said in a statement.

Hubble
The Hubble Telescope hovering in space. Wikimedia Commons

This gyro was turned on after the spacecraft entered safe mode due to a failed gyro on October 5.

Additional tests will be performed to ensure Hubble can return to science operations with this gyro, NASA said.

To correct high rotation rates, the Hubble team executed a running restart of the gyro on October 16.

This procedure turned the gyro off for one second, and then restarted it before the wheel spun down.

However, the data showed no improvement in the gyro’s performance.

Hubble Telescope. red dwarf
This gyro was turned on after the spacecraft entered safe mode due to a failed gyro on October 5. Flickr

The team, then on October 18, commanded a series of spacecraft maneuvers, or turns, in opposite directions to attempt to clear any blockage that may have caused the float to be off-centre and produce the exceedingly high rates.

During each maneuver, the gyro was switched from high mode to low mode to dislodge any blockage that may have accumulated around the float.

They noticed a significant reduction in the high rates, allowing rates to be measured in low mode for brief periods of time.

On October 19, the team again commanded Hubble to perform additional maneuvers and gyro mode switches, which appear to have cleared the issue.

NASA mars, UAE, Hubble
The planet Mars is shown May 12, 2016 in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope view when it was 50 million miles from Earth. VOA

The rotation rates produced by the backup gyro have since reduced and are now within an expected range, NASA noted.

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The team plans to execute a series of tests to evaluate the performance of the gyro under conditions similar to those encountered during routine science observations, including moving to targets, locking on to a target, and performing precision pointing.

After these engineering tests have been completed, Hubble is expected to soon return to normal science operations, NASA stated. (IANS)