Sunday October 21, 2018

Regular Dose of Aspirin Reduces Risk of Ovarian Cancer

For this study, published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the team analysed data on more than 200,000 women among which 1,054 developed ovarian cancer

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Aspirin, Ovarian cancer
Aspirin pills are arranged on a counter in New York, Aug. 23, 2018. New studies find most people won't benefit from taking daily low-dose aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke. (VOA)
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Taking a low-dose of aspirin daily may help women lower their risk of developing ovarian cancer by 23 per cent, suggests a new study.

Ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynaecological cancer, largely due to lack of early detection strategies and is believed that the inflammation that occurs during ovulation plays a role in the development of this cancer.

Aspirin is thought to lower cancer risk by reducing inflammation.

The findings, led by researchers from H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in the US, showed that low-dose aspirin use was associated with a lower risk of ovarian cancer while standard-dose aspirin use increased the risk, their findings revealed.

Aspirin
Aspirin may lower risk of ovarian cancer. Pixabay

Conversely, women who took non-aspirin anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve) — at least 10 tablets per week for many years, had an increased risk of developing the disease.

“We’re not quite at the stage where we could make the recommendation that daily aspirin use lowers ovarian cancer risk. We need to do more research. But it is definitely something women should discuss with their physician,” said Shelley Tworoger, Associate Centre Director from the varsity.

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For this study, published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the team analysed data on more than 200,000 women among which 1,054 developed ovarian cancer.

In addition, researchers looked at the participants’ use of aspirin (325 milligrams), low-dose aspirin (100 milligrams or less), non-aspirin NSAIDs and acetaminophen. (IANS)

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Ovarian Cancer Risks Cut in Half With a New Birth Control Pill: Study

Previous research had shown that the older products, containing higher levels of oestrogen and older progestogens, were tied to reduced ovarian cancer risk.

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Contraceptives, Wikimedia commons

New types of combined birth control pills — containing both lower doses of oestrogens and newer progestogens — may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer among young women, says a study.

The study, published in the journal The BMJ, showed that this positive effect strengthened with longer periods of use and persisted for several years after stopping.

“The reduced risk seems to persist after stopping use, although the duration of benefit is uncertain,” the study said.

At least 100 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception every day.

Ovarian Cancer
The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons

For the study, the researchers from University of Aberdeen in Scotland and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark analysed data for nearly 1.9 million Danish women aged 15-49 years between 1995 and 2014.

Women were categorised as never users (no record of being dispensed hormonal contraception), current or recent users (up to one year after stopping use), or former users (more than one year after stopping use) of different hormonal contraceptives.

Most (86 per cent) of the hormonal contraceptive use related to combined oral products.

The researchers found that the number of cases of ovarian cancer were highest in women who had never used hormonal contraception (7.5 per 100,000 person years), whereas among women who had ever used hormonal contraception, the number of cases of ovarian cancer were 3.2 per 100,000 person years.

Ovarian Cancer
At least 100 million women worldwide use hormonal contraception every day. . (IANS)

The reduced risk for combined products was seen with nearly all types of ovarian cancer, and there was little evidence of important differences between products containing different types of progestogens.

“Based on our results, contemporary combined hormonal contraceptives are still associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer in women of reproductive age, with patterns similar to those seen with older combined oral products,” the study authors said.

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Previous research had shown that the older products, containing higher levels of oestrogen and older progestogens, were tied to reduced ovarian cancer risk.

But it was not known whether the newer contraceptives carried the same benefit. (IANS)