Thursday December 12, 2019

Regular Dose of Aspirin Reduces Risk of Ovarian Cancer

For this study, published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the team analysed data on more than 200,000 women among which 1,054 developed ovarian cancer

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Aspirin, Ovarian cancer
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Taking a low-dose of aspirin daily may help women lower their risk of developing ovarian cancer by 23 per cent, suggests a new study.

Ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynaecological cancer, largely due to lack of early detection strategies and is believed that the inflammation that occurs during ovulation plays a role in the development of this cancer.

Aspirin is thought to lower cancer risk by reducing inflammation.

The findings, led by researchers from H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Centre and Research Institute in the US, showed that low-dose aspirin use was associated with a lower risk of ovarian cancer while standard-dose aspirin use increased the risk, their findings revealed.

Aspirin
Aspirin may lower risk of ovarian cancer. Pixabay

Conversely, women who took non-aspirin anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve) — at least 10 tablets per week for many years, had an increased risk of developing the disease.

“We’re not quite at the stage where we could make the recommendation that daily aspirin use lowers ovarian cancer risk. We need to do more research. But it is definitely something women should discuss with their physician,” said Shelley Tworoger, Associate Centre Director from the varsity.

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For this study, published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the team analysed data on more than 200,000 women among which 1,054 developed ovarian cancer.

In addition, researchers looked at the participants’ use of aspirin (325 milligrams), low-dose aspirin (100 milligrams or less), non-aspirin NSAIDs and acetaminophen. (IANS)

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Aspirin may Treat Acute Migraines Efficiently: Study

Aspirin can be safe option to treat migraines

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Aspirin treats migraines
Aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to treat acute migraines. Lifetime Stock

Aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to other, more expensive medications to treat acute migraines as well as prevent recurrent attacks, a new study suggests.

The review, published in the American Journal of Medicine, includes evidence from 13 randomised trials of the treatment of migraine in 4,222 patients and tens of thousands of patients in prevention of recurrent attacks.

The findings suggest that high-dose aspirin, in doses from 900 to 1,300 milligrams given at the onset of symptoms, is an effective and safe treatment option for acute migraine headaches.

In addition, some but not all randomised trials suggest the possibility that daily aspirin in doses from 81 to 325 milligrams may be an effective and safe treatment option for the prevention of recurrent migraine headaches.

“Our review supports the use of high dose aspirin to treat acute migraine as well as low dose daily aspirin to prevent recurrent attacks,” said study researcher Charles H. Hennekens from Florida Atlantic University in the US.

“Moreover, the relatively favourable side effect profile of aspirin and extremely low costs compared with other prescription drug therapies may provide additional clinical options for primary health care providers treating acute as well as recurrent migraine headaches,” Hennekens added.

Aspirin
Aspirin is less expensive as compared to other medications that treat migraines. Lifetime Stock

Common symptoms of migraine include a headache that often begins as a dull pain and then grows into a throbbing pain, which can be incapacitating and often occurs with nausea and vomiting, and sensitivity to sound, light and smell.

Migraines can last anywhere from four to 72 hours and may occur as many times as several times a week to only once a year.

“Migraine headaches are among the most common and potentially debilitating disorders encountered by primary health care providers,” said study first author Bianca Biglione.

“In fact, about one in 10 primary care patients present with headache and three out of four are migraines. Aspirin is readily available without a prescription, is inexpensive, and based on our review, was shown to be effective in many migraine patients when compared with alternative more expensive therapies,” Biglion added.

Approximately 36 million Americans suffer from migraine headaches and the cause of this disabling disorder is not well understood. There is a higher prevalence in women (18 per cent) than men (nine per cent).

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In women, the prevalence is highest during childbearing age.

According to the researchers, approximately 90 per cent of migraine sufferers report moderate to severe pain, with more than 50 per cent reporting severe impairment or the need for bed rest as well as reduced work or school productivity. (IANS)