Sunday December 8, 2019

Aspirin may Treat Acute Migraines Efficiently: Study

Aspirin can be safe option to treat migraines

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Aspirin treats migraines
Aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to treat acute migraines. Lifetime Stock

Aspirin can be considered an effective and safe option to other, more expensive medications to treat acute migraines as well as prevent recurrent attacks, a new study suggests.

The review, published in the American Journal of Medicine, includes evidence from 13 randomised trials of the treatment of migraine in 4,222 patients and tens of thousands of patients in prevention of recurrent attacks.

The findings suggest that high-dose aspirin, in doses from 900 to 1,300 milligrams given at the onset of symptoms, is an effective and safe treatment option for acute migraine headaches.

In addition, some but not all randomised trials suggest the possibility that daily aspirin in doses from 81 to 325 milligrams may be an effective and safe treatment option for the prevention of recurrent migraine headaches.

“Our review supports the use of high dose aspirin to treat acute migraine as well as low dose daily aspirin to prevent recurrent attacks,” said study researcher Charles H. Hennekens from Florida Atlantic University in the US.

“Moreover, the relatively favourable side effect profile of aspirin and extremely low costs compared with other prescription drug therapies may provide additional clinical options for primary health care providers treating acute as well as recurrent migraine headaches,” Hennekens added.

Aspirin
Aspirin is less expensive as compared to other medications that treat migraines. Lifetime Stock

Common symptoms of migraine include a headache that often begins as a dull pain and then grows into a throbbing pain, which can be incapacitating and often occurs with nausea and vomiting, and sensitivity to sound, light and smell.

Migraines can last anywhere from four to 72 hours and may occur as many times as several times a week to only once a year.

“Migraine headaches are among the most common and potentially debilitating disorders encountered by primary health care providers,” said study first author Bianca Biglione.

“In fact, about one in 10 primary care patients present with headache and three out of four are migraines. Aspirin is readily available without a prescription, is inexpensive, and based on our review, was shown to be effective in many migraine patients when compared with alternative more expensive therapies,” Biglion added.

Approximately 36 million Americans suffer from migraine headaches and the cause of this disabling disorder is not well understood. There is a higher prevalence in women (18 per cent) than men (nine per cent).

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In women, the prevalence is highest during childbearing age.

According to the researchers, approximately 90 per cent of migraine sufferers report moderate to severe pain, with more than 50 per cent reporting severe impairment or the need for bed rest as well as reduced work or school productivity. (IANS)

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Pharmacist-led Interventions May Prevent Heart Related Illnesses: Study

Pharmacist-led interventions may prevent heart disease

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Heart diseases
Interventions by pharmacists such as medical review and patient education can prevent heart diseases. Lifetime Stock

Researchers have found that pharmacist-led interventions such as patient education, medication review, and medication management can be pivotal in preventing heart related illnesses.

The study, published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, support the involvement of pharmacists as healthcare providers in managing patients with hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol.

“The evidence presented in this review provides an important message to health systems and policymakers regarding the effectiveness of general practice-based pharmacists’ interventions,” said study researcher Abdullah Alshehri from University of Birmingham in the US.

During the finding, the research team assessed medical literature for relevant randomised controlled clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of pharmacist-led interventions delivered in the general practice in reducing the medical risk factors of cardiovascular events.

They identified 21 trials involving a total 8,933 patients.

Healthy heart
Patients receiving pharmacist-led interventions experienced significant reductions in heart diseases. Lifetime Stock

Pharmacist-led interventions included patient education, medication review and counselling, physical assessment, assessing adherence, lifestyle modification, and medication management such as prescribing, adjusting, monitoring, and administering therapy and identifying drug-related problems.

The most frequently used pharmacist-led interventions were medication review and medication management.

Patients receiving pharmacist-led interventions experienced significant reductions in their systolic blood pressure (by an average of -9.33 mmHg); Hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood sugar levels (by an average of -0.76%); and LDL-cholesterol (by an average of -15.19 mg/dl).

Pharmacist-led interventions also helped patients correctly follow their prescribed medication regimens.

“The significant reductions in blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood cholesterol reported in this meta-analysis, if sustained in clinical practice, could have significant implications for managing hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia that could prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality,” Alshehri said.

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Alshehri noted that the findings support a greater involvement of pharmacists in general practice.

“This will benefit health organisations by providing cost-effective care associated with greater control of patients’ conditions and their medications,” he said. (IANS)